Westport EMS sees influx in calls, decrease in volunteers

Kavsuvb

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Here's the problem I see, Inflation and recession is making it harder for people to justify volunteering. Look at the price of Gas these days to respond from home and even responding to the station. I think the best solution is to allow High school Juniors and Seniors to go on calls. Even allow College students who are majoring in EMS, Nursing or even PA students to ride, do EMS calls.

 

DrParasite

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Here's the problem I see, Inflation and recession is making it harder for people to justify volunteering. Look at the price of Gas these days to respond from home and even responding to the station. I think the best solution is to allow High school Juniors and Seniors to go on calls. Even allow College students who are majoring in EMS, Nursing or even PA students to ride, do EMS calls.

How many volunteer cops does westport have? not specials or aux, regular patrol officers who are doing this on a volunteer basis?

how many volunteer firefighters does Westport have? They staff 4 fire stations, with 4 engines and a ladder, all staffed 24/7....

Here's the problem I see: The town doesn't want a paid EMS system; if they did, they would budget for it, and fund it 24/7.

as per the town's PD budget, the annual PD budget is a little under 12 million....As per the town's FD budget, the FD budget is a little under 9 million. So the town is willing to spend 21 million on Fire and PD, with a total town budget of 228 million (90% funded by property taxes), but can't allocate any funding to have an actual EMS department? And not, I don't mean giving the FD a few ambulances, I mean actually creating a 3rd service EMS department that handles all calls for the town, and is funded just like every other city department.
 

DesertMedic66

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Like many other cities they are willing to pay for a fire department and a police department but not an EMS department. As our overall population ages, EMS is now a very needed resource. Sounds like the residents need to come together and tell the city they need EMS service. I know many people will disagree and maybe it’s because I am in an area with pretty much no volunteer anything anymore but IMO all volunteer agencies need to die off. If you want service, especially 24/7 service, you are going to have to pay for it.
 

VentMonkey

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Very non-regional specific problem, IMO. Volunteer or paid, it affects all aspects of EMS and its funding, or lack there of. Undoubtedly, it adds to the seemingly endless list of reasons for high turnover.

Good news OP, CT is on there. But realistically who knows what it will mean at the state-level’s.
 

EpiEMS

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How many volunteer cops does westport have? not specials or aux, regular patrol officers who are doing this on a volunteer basis?

how many volunteer firefighters does Westport have? They staff 4 fire stations, with 4 engines and a ladder, all staffed 24/7....

Here's the problem I see: The town doesn't want a paid EMS system; if they did, they would budget for it, and fund it 24/7.

as per the town's PD budget, the annual PD budget is a little under 12 million....As per the town's FD budget, the FD budget is a little under 9 million. So the town is willing to spend 21 million on Fire and PD, with a total town budget of 228 million (90% funded by property taxes), but can't allocate any funding to have an actual EMS department? And not, I don't mean giving the FD a few ambulances, I mean actually creating a 3rd service EMS department that handles all calls for the town, and is funded just like every other city department.
They actually do have a hybrid career/volunteer system: Six full time employees, one part timer, plus a "Five-year (7/1/18-6/30/23) Paramedic Contract with Norwalk Hospital", plus the volunteers.

That said, if we do a little more digging...it becomes apparent that the setup is even more disparate from the true third service model (not only because EMS rolls up to PD). Going to the 2022-2023 budget, you can see EMS brings in about $900k, which covers about 2/3rds of operating costs, but the capex is covered by charity.

What does this mean? It's workable, but less than ideal. EMS is second tier, even in a town with median household income over $200k that can certainly pay for it.
 

RocketMedic

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Way I see it, problem is that people with no credible opinions or expertise in prehospital emergency medicine have outlandishly stupid ideas as to how to provide services. **stares at Kavsuvb**

High school juniors. Really? You want to put a literal 16 year old in charge of resuscitating someone?

Why not toss them into the Atlantic as a rescue swimmers as well? Maybe some airframe maintenance too? I hear the Marines are short on combat engineers, why not that as well?

Please think before you post. Your opinions lack any semblance of credibility and you lack expertise in any aspect of this field.
 

EpiEMS

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High school juniors. Really? You want to put a literal 16 year old in charge of resuscitating someone?
For better or worse, it's real (supplemented by a town over's non-profit medics -- but only 1)...in a town that has somehow only has volunteer fire and a household income in the $200k range...

Just another example of the dysfunction of CT.
 

RocketMedic

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For better or worse, it's real (supplemented by a town over's non-profit medics -- but only 1)...in a town that has somehow only has volunteer fire and a household income in the $200k range...

Just another example of the dysfunction of CT.
Yeah Darien is weird.
 

DrParasite

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They actually do have a hybrid career/volunteer system: Six full time employees, one part timer, plus a "Five-year (7/1/18-6/30/23) Paramedic Contract with Norwalk Hospital", plus the volunteers.

That said, if we do a little more digging...it becomes apparent that the setup is even more disparate from the true third service model (not only because EMS rolls up to PD).
So they have two agencies, one that is entirely town funded, and one just provides staffing, equipment and fund raising, all working on the same ambulances. OK, that's makes some sense... they have 1 ambulances staffed by municipal employees, and two reserves.

Compare that to the 4 engines and a ladder that are staffed 24/7... and the city funds the following staffing positions:
• 7 Chief Officers• 12 Lieutenants• 2 Inspectors and a Fire Marshal• 44 Uniformed Firefighters• 4 Civilian Dispatchers• 1 Equipment Mechanic• 2 Support Staff. And their call volume is as follows: This fiscal year the Department will respond to approximately 3,800 emergency calls for service. The Department will respond to approximately 70 fires in structures. All this is per their linkedin page. Anyone want to guess how many of their calls are EMS related? maybe 60%? maybe 80%?

So they have 63 full time employees... compared to 7 full time EMS people (the 6 employees plus the paramedic). 5 fire trucks vs one ambulance... hmmm, I wonder where the needs is greater... but where is the funding allocated

Going to the 2022-2023 budget, you can see EMS brings in about $900k, which covers about 2/3rds of operating costs, but the capex is covered by charity.
and how much revenue does the FD bring in? or the PD? or DPW?
What does this mean? It's workable, but less than ideal. EMS is second tier, even in a town with median household income over $200k that can certainly pay for it.
They can pay for it... they just don't want to, because they have been getting the service for cheap / free for 40+ years, so why change now?
 

ffemt8978

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So they have two agencies, one that is entirely town funded, and one just provides staffing, equipment and fund raising, all working on the same ambulances. OK, that's makes some sense... they have 1 ambulances staffed by municipal employees, and two reserves.

Compare that to the 4 engines and a ladder that are staffed 24/7... and the city funds the following staffing positions:
• 7 Chief Officers• 12 Lieutenants• 2 Inspectors and a Fire Marshal• 44 Uniformed Firefighters• 4 Civilian Dispatchers• 1 Equipment Mechanic• 2 Support Staff. And their call volume is as follows: This fiscal year the Department will respond to approximately 3,800 emergency calls for service. The Department will respond to approximately 70 fires in structures. All this is per their linkedin page. Anyone want to guess how many of their calls are EMS related? maybe 60%? maybe 80%?

So they have 63 full time employees... compared to 7 full time EMS people (the 6 employees plus the paramedic). 5 fire trucks vs one ambulance... hmmm, I wonder where the needs is greater... but where is the funding allocated


and how much revenue does the FD bring in? or the PD? or DPW?

They can pay for it... they just don't want to, because they have been getting the service for cheap / free for 40+ years, so why change now?
One of the reasons often overlooked for fire staffing is ISO ratings and how they can effect homeowners insurance rates. A lot of people would get really upset if their insurance rates skyrocketed because Fzd staffing was cut.

Until a similar system gets put in place for EMS, we're facing an uphill battle to gain public support.
 
OP
OP
Kavsuvb

Kavsuvb

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Way I see it, problem is that people with no credible opinions or expertise in prehospital emergency medicine have outlandishly stupid ideas as to how to provide services. **stares at Kavsuvb**

High school juniors. Really? You want to put a literal 16 year old in charge of resuscitating someone?

Why not toss them into the Atlantic as a rescue swimmers as well? Maybe some airframe maintenance too? I hear the Marines are short on combat engineers, why not that as well?

Please think before you post. Your opinions lack any semblance of credibility and you lack expertise in any aspect of this field.
In the state of Connecticut, they do allow High school Juniors and Seniors to take EMR and EMT classes. Many Volunteer squads in Ct allow High school Juniors and Seniors to ride on calls but they are restricted to weekends, holidays, and summer time. During the weekday, it's up to the Chief to allow high school students to respond to calls. In Connecticut, you have to be 16 years old to be allowed to take the EMT class and take the state EMT exam.

Here's an example in Connecticut, that allows High school students to get EMT cards.

Darien EMS in Darien Connecticut is one example where they allow High school kids to respond to EMS class.

Here's an example of high school EMT's


In Connecticut, it's how we're attracting High school students who will wind up in Nursing, PA, or MD school by getting a start as an EMT. Some even use it to get into Paramedic school when they graduate from High school.

BTW, I am from Connecticut and I have seen EMTs as young as 16 and EMRs as young as High school Freshman
 
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RocketMedic

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Oh, I’m aware of Darien. It’s interesting. In the sense that yes, some teenagers have done amazing things on the battlefield, at sea, etc.

It’s also a massive slap in the face of professional paramedics.

“Oh, your job is a high-schoolers playtime internship for medical school applications”.

You don’t see them handing Glocks to these kids and telling them to run patrol.
 

DrParasite

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Kavsuvb

Kavsuvb

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Kavsuvb

Kavsuvb

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It’s also a massive slap in the face of professional paramedics.

“Oh, your job is a high-schoolers playtime internship for medical school applications”.
Not really dude because many High school EMTs are often mentored into health care Majors in college such as Nursing, PA, NP, and even Paramedic school. It's how we prepare the next generation of EMT's Paramedics, RN, NP's, PA's and even MD or DO's
 

Bullets

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Not really dude because many High school EMTs are often mentored into health care Majors in college such as Nursing, PA, NP, and even Paramedic school. It's how we prepare the next generation of EMT's Paramedics, RN, NP's, PA's and even MD or DO's
Plenty of nurses and docotrs and paramedics (Myself) made it into medicicine without being exposed to the job as a child.
 

Jim37F

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Just going to point out that the 16 year olds in the British military (which is already controversial in the UK for being pretty much the only Western military to use literal child soldiers...) are only allowed to train... they're not allowed to actually deploy anywhere and conduct real operations...
 

VentMonkey

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High school kids learning emergency care a liability? Sure, somewhat. Lack maturity? Sure, but again many “adults” hardly possess levels of maturity associated with successful adulting.

Teaching them life skills to build upon, and giving them positive direction, I don’t see as an abomination to our profession. I think much of our lack of adaptation is because of willingness to accept adaptations. Who’s really to blame?
 
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