Physicians Assistant ?

Brandon O

Puzzled by facies
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Since the AMA created PAs they will always be somehow under the supervision of a Doc, to what extent largely depends on what state they are in.
Who knows. They haven't been very active pursuing this, but it does mostly depend on the state, not on who created what.

I think another consideration in deciding NP or PA depends on what type of practice you want to have. ED and surgical specialties seem to have a larger proportion of PAs, and generally PA training seems to be more geared towards this; neonatal, pediatric, and psych specialties seems to much more strongly prefer NPs, I suspect that this is largely due to NP training tracks specific to these practice areas.

There are some specialty oriented training programs for PAs, but they seem to have more flexibility in choosing their practice areas than NPs. This used to be the case with FNPs, but there has been a bigger push recently in some areas to have primary care NPs (compared to NNP, PNP-AC, and AGAC) to only practice in outpatient settings.
Agree that PAs are usually more suited to surgical work. As I understand it NPs usually need to undertake additional training to assist in the OR.

True that NPs are a bit more specialized in training (roughly specialized programs versus fully generalist NP programs), but how much this matters seems to vary. I have certainly seen FNPs working in the acute care setting.
 

Remi

Forum Deputy Chief
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Since the AMA created PAs they will always be somehow under the supervision of a Doc
Not so sure about that: Big News for OTP in North Dakota

Economics is a hard force to ignore over the long term, and economics definitely favors independent "mid level" (again, I hate that term because it is demeaning and factually inaccurate) practice.

For purely political reasons, PA's lag far behind NP's in this area, but they will eventually catch up.
 

Peak

ED/Prehospital Registered Nurse
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As I understand it NPs usually need to undertake additional training to assist in the OR.

True that NPs are a bit more specialized in training (roughly specialized programs versus fully generalist NP programs), but how much this matters seems to vary. I have certainly seen FNPs working in the acute care setting.
Yeah, NPs would need to get their RNFA.

There are FNPs who work acute care, but they have mostly been there before the proliferation of acute care NP specialties. New FNPs will have a much harder time finding acute care jobs than before. Every RN I know who when FNP instead of AGNPAC or PNPAC ended up having to take a clinic job, this isn't universal by any means but the demand is so much higher in primary care now.

Not so sure about that: Big News for OTP in North Dakota

Economics is a hard force to ignore over the long term, and economics definitely favors independent "mid level" (again, I hate that term because it is demeaning and factually inaccurate) practice.

For purely political reasons, PA's lag far behind NP's in this area, but they will eventually catch up.
I wasn't aware of that but I'll be surprised if it actually passes.

Like you said it's all political, and I think the medical and nursing interests will likely both be against it in the long term.
 
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