Physician Assistant ?

Lemur

Forum Ride Along
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You sure about that? so you have checked with every PA program, and asked the applicants if they applied to med school? especially the ones who are under the age of 25?

Think about this: in many cases, the prerequisite classes are similar. they often have high academic requirements, with minimal prior work requirements. they are providers in the medical field. No, not every PA students got rejected from medical school, but to say there aren't any is sheer ignorance.

And yes, a college student with high grades in the sciences and some work experience in healthcare (and a bachelors degree) often makes for a strong admission to PA school too.

I mean, unless https://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/what-happens-to-all-of-the-pre-meds-that-dont-make-it-into-med-school.924692/post-12676095 is wrong. or this recommendation https://differentmedicalcareers.com/not-getting-into-medical-school/ or https://blog.accepted.com/dreaded-med-school-rejection-now-2/ or https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-254-md-vs-pa-lets-talk-about-it-with-a-pa-to-help-you-decide/ are also wrong.....
then feel free to actually provide a verifiable source, not just anecdotal comments/
SDN is not a legitimate source to get information about PA applicants. My understanding of the applicant pool comes from being in a leadership position with in my state’s PA academy and regularly working with faculty from multiple programs in our area and nationally on PA education related events. I’ve also participated in the admissions process.


PA applicants are a heterogenous group. Prior applicants to medical school make up perhaps single digit percentages of class composition. There are multiple reasons for this.

I don’t care to press this point to change your mind, but to ensure there is a challenge to what you’re saying for others to read and keep in mind, as they stumble onto this thread.
 

SandpitMedic

Crowd pleaser
Premium Member
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SDN is not a legitimate source to get information about PA applicants. My understanding of the applicant pool comes from being in a leadership position with in my state’s PA academy and regularly working with faculty from multiple programs in our area and nationally on PA education related events. I’ve also participated in the admissions process.


PA applicants are a heterogenous group. Prior applicants to medical school make up perhaps single digit percentages of class composition. There are multiple reasons for this.

I don’t care to press this point to change your mind, but to ensure there is a challenge to what you’re saying for others to read and keep in mind, as they stumble onto this thread.
Louder for the people in the back.
Well said.
 

Ewok Jerky

PA-C
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I skipped a few pages and see we are still arguing about PA schools being filled with med school rejects?

The program I went to had 1/30 in my class. Late 20s guy who was a paramedic.

The admissions team didn't think med school flunkies would make good PAs because they would always be unhappy about being a second tier provider, and I tend to agree with them. I've never been invited back to career fairs because I tell all the kids who come to my PA Table to go to medical school instead 😂

Anyways back to the OP,
Find a few programs and make a list of pre-reqs and get going. check off all the boxes on your way to a Bachelor's Degree in literally anything. Keep getting experience as an EMT. Apply to PA programs far and wide.
 

SandpitMedic

Crowd pleaser
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There have been some recent “feeler” surveys out for PAs changing their title. These are sponsored surveys from the AAPA and their hired consulting agency.

The vote thus far has seemingly favored the title Physician Associate. There is an underdog title that about 30% support: Medical Care Practitioner.

The official vote and change will not be until April or May 2020 at the next national PA gathering. It does appear the title will be missing the word “assistant.”
 

Kavsuvb

Forum Lieutenant
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NP school should be easier to do from a logistical standpoint but the end result wouldn't allow me the flexibility that a PA has.
As far as NP's, it depends on what State your in and for example, in Connecticut, NP's have independent practice rights and full practice rights. Here's a list of states that allow NP's Full practice. https://campaignforaction.org/resource/state-practice-environment-nurse-practitioners/

As with NP's, Most NP's specialize, in Family practice, Women's health, pediatric and Psychiatric/Mental health. Whereas PA's you have the same opportunities to specialize as an MD/DO.

As with PA's most PA's fill in for places where they can't get a Doctor and cover for the Doctor when the doctor is away at a conference or working on the much harder cases.

In my experience, I had an NP who specializes in Endocrinology and especially in treating people with very rare diseases that I have. She graduated from Smith College with a Biology degree and got her Nursing degree from Yale Univ school of Nursing GEPN Program
 

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