Would benadryl help anaphylaxis any?

Remi

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Do the H2's really help at all? My understanding is they do not. I give them (along with H1's and steroids) pre-emptively at times, but when I do, it unfortunately it has as much to do with legal indications as clinical ones.
 

wilderness911

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Do the H2's really help at all? My understanding is they do not. I give them (along with H1's and steroids) pre-emptively at times, but when I do, it unfortunately it has as much to do with legal indications as clinical ones.
There is some clinical evidence indicating a benefit to using both h1 and h2 blockers for symptomatic treatment of anaphylaxis. Read the paper a while ago, can dig it up if you would like?

Countering the release of histamine at the H2 receptors could help with GI, cardiac, and vasodilation aspects of anaphylaxis if my understanding is correct. Probably not necessary, but the data there is indicates it may be better than h1 blockers alone. I haven't seen any large scale and incredibly compelling RCT/studies to really sink the point home though. Hope that helps!
 

SpecialK

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There is some clinical evidence indicating a benefit to using both h1 and h2 blockers for symptomatic treatment of anaphylaxis. Read the paper a while ago, can dig it up if you would like?
They might help relieve symptoms but the definitive treatment is adrenaline so should be given first.
 

Fred weber

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What about dosing in this situation? Presumably we want to go higher than the standard dosage which is aimed more at hay fever and whatnot? Antihistamines have a pretty wide therapeutic index, I think... Depending on how deathly allergic he is, maybe have him take 5x the recommended dose on the package?

If all we have is PO, does it make sense to have him chew the tablets up for faster absorption?
First off I’m not a EMT in anyway. So a lot of the terminology mentioned is over my head .
Secondly
You guys can kick me off after this comment I’ll still be able to read the answer.

My grandson is allergic to bee venom so I’ve looked into this quite a bit.

Under the same circumstances as in the op “you’re 6 miles deep in the woods with no EpiPen and only Benadryl “.

From what I’ve read one of the main problems with Benadryl is that it takes to long to enter the bloodstream.

Absorption is very fast in the nasal passages . So the neophyte in me ask’s. Would administration that way be a good idea? If the airway is restricted it could be blown up their nose with a straw, hollow pen casing or something similar.

Thanks in advance

Worried grandpa
 

luke_31

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First off I’m not a EMT in anyway. So a lot of the terminology mentioned is over my head .
Secondly
You guys can kick me off after this comment I’ll still be able to read the answer.

My grandson is allergic to bee venom so I’ve looked into this quite a bit.

Under the same circumstances as in the op “you’re 6 miles deep in the woods with no EpiPen and only Benadryl “.

From what I’ve read one of the main problems with Benadryl is that it takes to long to enter the bloodstream.

Absorption is very fast in the nasal passages . So the neophyte in me ask’s. Would administration that way be a good idea? If the airway is restricted it could be blown up their nose with a straw, hollow pen casing or something similar.

Thanks in advance

Worried grandpa
We don’t give medical advice on this forum.
 

Gurby

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First off I’m not a EMT in anyway. So a lot of the terminology mentioned is over my head .
Secondly
You guys can kick me off after this comment I’ll still be able to read the answer.

My grandson is allergic to bee venom so I’ve looked into this quite a bit.

Under the same circumstances as in the op “you’re 6 miles deep in the woods with no EpiPen and only Benadryl “.

From what I’ve read one of the main problems with Benadryl is that it takes to long to enter the bloodstream.

Absorption is very fast in the nasal passages . So the neophyte in me ask’s. Would administration that way be a good idea? If the airway is restricted it could be blown up their nose with a straw, hollow pen casing or something similar.

Thanks in advance

Worried grandpa
Really this is a conversation that should be had with your grandson's physician / his parents. If he is at risk of having an anaphylactic reaction from a bee sting, he probably should have an EpiPen with him if he's going into the woods (or an adult should be carrying one).

If the airway is constricted or the person's blood pressure is dropping, Benadryl is unlikely to solve those problems even if you could have it be absorbed immediately.

For example: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25141245
Although histamine is involved in anaphylaxis, treatment with antihistamines does not relieve or prevent all of the pathophysiological symptoms of anaphylaxis, including the more serious complications such as airway obstruction, hypotension, and shock.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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First off I’m not a EMT in anyway. So a lot of the terminology mentioned is over my head .
Secondly
You guys can kick me off after this comment I’ll still be able to read the answer.

My grandson is allergic to bee venom so I’ve looked into this quite a bit.

Under the same circumstances as in the op “you’re 6 miles deep in the woods with no EpiPen and only Benadryl “.

From what I’ve read one of the main problems with Benadryl is that it takes to long to enter the bloodstream.

Absorption is very fast in the nasal passages . So the neophyte in me ask’s. Would administration that way be a good idea? If the airway is restricted it could be blown up their nose with a straw, hollow pen casing or something similar.

Thanks in advance

Worried grandpa
As was said, we don't give medical advice here.

That being said, as a general rule, blowing any non-nasal medication up anyone's nose is not something I would do. if a medicine isn't designed by the manufacturer to go in a certain orifice, I'm not going to try something new just because of something I read on the internet. Just my general rule, not about your situation.

If you are that concerned, I would have a sit down with his pediatrician. He could give you some much better advice on what to do and what not to do.
 

Fred weber

Forum Ride Along
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Really this is a conversation that should be had with your grandson's physician / his parents. If he is at risk of having an anaphylactic reaction from a bee sting, he probably should have an EpiPen with him if he's going into the woods (or an adult should be carrying one).

If the airway is constricted or the person's blood pressure is dropping, Benadryl is unlikely to solve those problems even if you could have it be absorbed immediately.

For example: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25141245
Thank you sir
 
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