EMS Mnemonics (memory device)

Achilles

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Aprz you are a nerd :p
Thank you for so many mnemonics! :D
 

Martyn

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MHHN
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My Head Hurts Now :rofl:
 

potoole

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RICES Early injury treatment, usually related to sports.
R - Rest
I - Ice
C - Compression
E - Elevation
S - Splint

RNCHAMPS Types of shock
R - Respiratory
N - Neurolgenic
C - Cardiogenic
H - Hypervolemic
A - Anaphylactic
M - Metabolic
P - Psychogenic
S - Septic

This was all i could think of that i didn't find. I'll look through my notes for more!
 

Clare

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R - Respiratory
N - Neurolgenic
H - Hypervolemic
M - Metabolic
P - Psychogenic
It's hypovolaemic (hypovolemic) not hypervolaemic (hypervolemic) and neurogenic, not neurolgenic. The prefix "hypo" refers to lower than normal, while "hyper" means higher than normal, FYI.

What are respiratory, metabolic and psychogenic shock? I have never heard of these, nor heard of them ever referenced in any source, ever.

I have always been taught shock can be defined as cardiogenic, hypovolaemic, anaphylactic, septic, hypoadrenal or neurogenic.
 
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potoole

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It's hypovolaemic (hypovolemic) not hypervolaemic (hypervolemic) and neurogenic, not neurolgenic. The prefix "hypo" refers to lower than normal, while "hyper" means higher than normal, FYI.

What are respiratory, metabolic and psychogenic shock? I have never heard of these, nor heard of them ever referenced in any source, ever.

I have always been taught shock can be defined as cardiogenic, hypovolaemic, anaphylactic, septic, hypoadrenal or neurogenic.
yes, sorry, if anyone can edit that for me that would be great, i cant seem to edit it myself. and as for respiratory, metabolic, and psychogenic, respiratory would involve failure, i think metabolic would be an expansion of your hypoadrenal, and psychogenic was downright confusing, and if i remember correctly it almost never occured alone.

A couple more that came to mind:
GEMS for geriatric patients
G - Geriatric
E - Environmental assessment
M - Medical Assessment
S - Social Assessment

PAT or Pediatric Assessment Triangle
-Appearance
-Work of Breathing
-Circulation to the Skin
 

Clare

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yes, sorry, if anyone can edit that for me that would be great, i cant seem to edit it myself. and as for respiratory, metabolic, and psychogenic, respiratory would involve failure, i think metabolic would be an expansion of your hypoadrenal, and psychogenic was downright confusing, and if i remember correctly it almost never occured alone.
Shock is global reduction in blood flow caused by either obstruction to flow (cardiogenic shock) or distribution failure (other causes e.g. septic, hypovolaemic, anaphylactic etc).

The only possible aetiology of "respiratory shock" I can think of would be a pulmonary embolism causing inadequate venous return to the heart which technically would be a form of obstructive shock. Pure respiratory failure would result in acidosis due to the byproducts of aerobic metabolism being retained but to my knowledge would not cause a form of shock itself.

PAT or Pediatric Assessment Triangle
-Appearance
-Work of Breathing
-Circulation to the Skin
This is a great contribution, the paediatric assessment triangle is very helpful and an excellent tool for assessing small children, which is hard enough as it is!
 

potoole

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Shock is global reduction in blood flow caused by either obstruction to flow (cardiogenic shock) or distribution failure (other causes e.g. septic, hypovolaemic, anaphylactic etc).

The only possible aetiology of "respiratory shock" I can think of would be a pulmonary embolism causing inadequate venous return to the heart which technically would be a form of obstructive shock. Pure respiratory failure would result in acidosis due to the byproducts of aerobic metabolism being retained but to my knowledge would not cause a form of shock itself.



This is a great contribution, the paediatric assessment triangle is very helpful and an excellent tool for assessing small children, which is hard enough as it is!

Shock is actually the decreased perfusion of oxygen to the cells, organs, and systems to the body, aka hypoperfusion, it doesn't necessarily have to be reduced blood flow.

-Respiratory shock could be caused my any Respiratory insufficiency.
-Psychogenic is a sudden reaction by the nervous system causing vascular dilation, which then results in syncope.
-Metabolic is abnormally high or low levels of nutrients or chemical transmitters in the body. An example is insulin shock

Thank you for the compliment by the way. I remembered the PAT because my younger brother (8 y/o) had come downstairs because he woke up early due to not feeling well.
 

potoole

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Here the one we were taught for KEDs:
My Baby Looks Hot Tonight
Middle Bottom Legs Head Top
I learned it as My Baby Looks Hot Tonight. But I'm pretty sure that's because that's how my state wants it done.

Another one about children, this one more for obstetrics though.

APGAR
A - Appearance
P - Pulse
G - Grimace
A - Activity
R - Respirations

Each one rated on a scale of 0, 1, or 2.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
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Another one about children, this one more for obstetrics though.

APGAR
A - Appearance
P - Pulse
G - Grimace
A - Activity
R - Respirations

Each one rated on a scale of 0, 1, or 2.
Actually for newborns only, used to assess health immediately after birth.
 

potoole

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Actually for newborns only, used to assess health immediately after birth.
Yea, I meant to say 1st minute, and 5 minutes this is assessed. and the acronym I said above, i just realized I wrote the same thing he did. I meant to write My Baby Loves To Help.
 

medichopeful

Flight nurse, ground paramedic
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I learned it as My Baby Looks Hot Tonight. But I'm pretty sure that's because that's how my state wants it done.
They actually want you doing the head last. So "My Baby Looks Too Hot" would be more accurate!
 

Aprz

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Since I learned them talking about RSI in the ALS forum, some of them can be used for BLS.

MOANS for difficult bag-mask ventilation
Mask seal
Obese/obstruction
Age (>55)
No teeth (leave dentures, put it in, or put gauze in cheecks)
Stiff lungs (COPD, asthma, etc), history of sleep apnea, snoring

BOOTS alternative to MOANS.
Beard (can use KY jelly for better seal, but too much can make it more difficult!)
Obese/obstruction
Old (>55)
Teeth (leave denture, put it in, or stuff gauze in cheeks)
Stiff lungs (COPD, asthma, etc), history of sleep apnea, snoring)

Old age becomes an issue because of muscle tone making it difficult to have a good seal with the mask.

These are mnemonics to help you recognize when it may be difficult to bag-mask ventilate, and what tou can do. Obviously what I am repeating from my books and what I've read online may not be acceptable to your company, agency, state, etc standards.

In some areas (e.g. Kern County, CA), EMTs can use extraglottic devices (EGD) like the King Airway or CombiTubes.

RODS for difficult EGD.
Restricted mouth opening (obviously trismus is gonna make it impossible)
Obese/obstruction (common theme with all these difficult airway management)
Disrupted/distorted airway (e.g. facial trauma)
Stiff lungs (COPD, asthma), history of sleep apnea, snoring

In the book and what I've read online, obesity, obstruction, pregnancy, airway diseases made airway and oxygenation more difficult. Particularly obese and/or pregnant females desaturate more quickly. Issues with them is they have something against their diaphragm limiting it's movement, and for obese people, their airway is surrounded by adipose tissue (contributing to snoring and sleep apnea).

I recommend looking up Sakle's triangle, which now has a fourth dimension because of EGD gaining popularity. Maybe they'll starting calling it a square or rectangle.
 
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NYMedic828

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Anyone else find it more difficult to remember the silly mnemonics than to just remember the medical knowledge you need to succeed...
 

Aprz

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I think it's whatever. There are things like the 12 cranial nerves I learned without mnemonics (I honestly cannot remember the mnemonic for their name and type), but there are other things where mnemonics help me like remembering the bones in your hand. I think mnemonics are great, but people have to remember they are only memory device and have limitations.
 

BASICallyEMT

Forum Lieutenant
Premium Member
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My Crofft... completely agree.

Vertebrae in Spine:
Cervical – 7
Thoracic-12
Lumbar-5
Sacrum-5
Coccyx-4
Can’t Those Lazy Students Count

About one of the few things I remember from A&P in high school, that and Gummy Bear dissections to recall Anatomical terms of location, etc.
Call the lawyer steve cox @ 7-12-5-5-4 0
Call - Cervical - 7
The - Thoracic - 12
Lawyer - Lumbar - 5
Steve - Sacrum - 5
Cox - Coccyx - 4
 

medichopeful

Flight nurse, ground paramedic
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Anyone else find it more difficult to remember the silly mnemonics than to just remember the medical knowledge you need to succeed...
Eh, they can be helpful. Now, strictly memorizing all of the knowledge needed to be a good provider by only memorizing mnemonics would be ridiculous. But they're a useful tool for many things! For example those darn 13 cranial nerves!*

(*Or 12; without a mnemonic I can never remember ;):lol:)

Edit: didn't see that Aprz made a CN reference already. Clearly starting out the new year well here!
 
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Aprz

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Eh, they can be helpful. Now, strictly memorizing all of the knowledge needed to be a good provider by only memorizing mnemonics would be ridiculous. But they're a useful tool for many things! For example those darn 13 cranial nerves!*

(*Or 12; without a mnemonic I can never remember ;):lol:)

Edit: didn't see that Aprz made a CN reference already. Clearly starting out the new year well here!
Meh, other people already said some CN mnemonics. I was just saying that sometimes mnemonic are helpful, sometimes not e.g. I can't remember the mnemonic for CN, easier without the mnemonic in my opinion.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
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I found the mnemonics helped when I was in paramedic school. However, now before I intubate someone, I'm looking for the clues that may predict a difficult intubation without having to rely on reciting LEMONS or BONES. The same with a history. New EMTs always try to gather a SAMPLE, while experienced providers have a focused Q and A to get the information they need.
 

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