32 yo Male - general illness

xterrabuzz

Forum Ride Along
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It wasn't until I joined this forum that I realized that medics really do have a f**kin chip on their shoulder. Let me fill you in on a little secret...there are also **** medics out on rigs that don't have a f**kin clue. The guy makes a typo and NomadicMedic jumps all over his ****? Really? As an EMT-B and RN student and working for level 1 system as an ER tech and on the rigs and can tell you there is a hell of a lot more incompetent medics than basics. You take a year class and think your god? And guess what mister I work in urban area.....rural areas don't have a choice in most cases. Sorry, the rural volunteers are not as brilliant as you NomadicMedic! I see you are in education..when was the last time you were on a rig?
 

VFlutter

Flight Nurse
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Uh...that did not appear to be a typo but rather a profound lack of understanding of a basic medical concept.

I see you are new to the forum. Don't poke the bears.
 

VentMonkey

Keyboard Warrior
Premium Member
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when was the last time you were on a rig?
I'm pretty sure it was sometime last week, but I'll let him call it. Anyhow, you're the one who's coming across as having a major chip on their shoulder:).
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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oooo you work as an ER tech for a level 1 system? so that makes you the nurses assistant right? not really all that impressive..... the RN student isn't all the impressive either; come talk to me once you passed you nursing boards, and have earned your RN.

A typo is a misspelling....calling it insolin instead of insulin. saying you would give sugar to a guy with a high BGL is not a typo, it's a lack of understanding to what is occurring with the patient, and potentially delivering a contraindicated medication.

I know quite a few idiot paramedics that I wouldn't let treat my worst enemy. I know quite a few idiot EMTs that shouldn't even be on the ambulance. And I know both who work in urban areas and some who work in the sticks. Regardless of where you work, it's expected that the provider who show up has a competent grasp of the material for their level of certification; doesn't matter if they are paid or volunteer.

Maybe you should calm down a little bit, you seem to have an over inflated sense of self, and that won't help you when you do become an RN, and you disagree with a doctor regarding a treatment, saying "well I'm a nurse" and he says "well I have MD after my name, so until you do too, STFU and do what my order tell you to do."

BTW, NomadicMedic works full time on a truck, so I'm guessing the last time he was on a truck was in the last day or two. I'm an EMT with 10 years of urban experience, and teach EMT classes. And if any of my students ever did that in a skill station, it would be an automatic fail for that scenario. If they did it in the field, they would likely get taken off the truck and sent to a clinical educator for remediation.
 
OP
NomadicMedic

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
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Yikes.

Well, I was last on a truck over the weekend and I'm on my way in to work my night shift in an hour or two. So, I guess it's been about 3 days.

I think the other guys covered it all. Is there anything else?


It wasn't until I joined this forum that I realized that medics really do have a f**kin chip on their shoulder. Let me fill you in on a little secret...there are also **** medics out on rigs that don't have a f**kin clue. The guy makes a typo and NomadicMedic jumps all over his ****? Really? As an EMT-B and RN student and working for level 1 system as an ER tech and on the rigs and can tell you there is a hell of a lot more incompetent medics than basics. You take a year class and think your god? And guess what mister I work in urban area.....rural areas don't have a choice in most cases. Sorry, the rural volunteers are not as brilliant as you NomadicMedic! I see you are in education..when was the last time you were on a rig?
 

medichopeful

Flight nurse, ground paramedic
1,815
208
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It wasn't until I joined this forum that I realized that medics really do have a f**kin chip on their shoulder. Let me fill you in on a little secret...there are also **** medics out on rigs that don't have a f**kin clue. The guy makes a typo and NomadicMedic jumps all over his ****? Really? As an EMT-B and RN student and working for level 1 system as an ER tech and on the rigs and can tell you there is a hell of a lot more incompetent medics than basics. You take a year class and think your god? And guess what mister I work in urban area.....rural areas don't have a choice in most cases. Sorry, the rural volunteers are not as brilliant as you NomadicMedic! I see you are in education..when was the last time you were on a rig?
Welcome to the forum! Let me take a few minutes to give you some hints to make your stay more education and enjoyable:

1) Congrats on your accomplishments and furthering your education. Seriously. With that being said, if this is the attitude you have as a student, you're going to be in for a rather rude awakening. Trust me, as an RN student and EMT-B you don't know as much as you think you know, and with that attitude nobody is going to care to listen to what you do know.

2) NomadicMedic is one of the more senior members on this forum. As a new member, I'd treat him with more respect. See point 1 for further information on this.

3) There are plenty of typos in your response above, so I'm assuming that you know what a "typo" is. It's possible that the glucose comment was a typo, but suggesting D50 or glucagon as well suggests that it is more a lack of understanding of the situation, or a failure to read appropriately (which we're all guilty of). Either way, if we in the medical field make a mistake, we need to be called out on it. That's how problems get fixed and we learn.

4) Ask questions, get involved, and learn from the posters on this forum. If you check the attitude at the door, you'll be able to learn a lot from this place.

Hope this helps!
 

DesertMedic66

Forum Troll
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It wasn't until I joined this forum that I realized that medics really do have a f**kin chip on their shoulder. Let me fill you in on a little secret...there are also **** medics out on rigs that don't have a f**kin clue. The guy makes a typo and NomadicMedic jumps all over his ****? Really? As an EMT-B and RN student and working for level 1 system as an ER tech and on the rigs and can tell you there is a hell of a lot more incompetent medics than basics. You take a year class and think your god? And guess what mister I work in urban area.....rural areas don't have a choice in most cases. Sorry, the rural volunteers are not as brilliant as you NomadicMedic! I see you are in education..when was the last time you were on a rig?
Oh this is going to be fun.

Thank you for your insite EMT/ER tech. I think bed 3 just left and needs to be cleaned....
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
Community Leader
4,405
868
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It wasn't until I joined this forum that I realized that medics really do have a f**kin chip on their shoulder. Let me fill you in on a little secret...there are also **** medics out on rigs that don't have a f**kin clue. The guy makes a typo and NomadicMedic jumps all over his ****? Really? As an EMT-B and RN student and working for level 1 system as an ER tech and on the rigs and can tell you there is a hell of a lot more incompetent medics than basics. You take a year class and think your god? And guess what mister I work in urban area.....rural areas don't have a choice in most cases. Sorry, the rural volunteers are not as brilliant as you NomadicMedic! I see you are in education..when was the last time you were on a rig?
Actually, most of the folks here don't have a chip on their shoulder. They're mostly very knowledgeable and professional folks. You're an EMT-B and RN student and you work as an ED Tech. Guess what? Most of the folks that chimed in are Paramedics, RNs, and currently work in the ED, ICU, or in the field (flight or ground). We have a couple of Physicians and a couple of PAs that grace our forum as well and I'm glad they're here! I'm an ED Nurse and a Paramedic that's Sports Med trained. Very unusual but thorough education. You really don't know what you don't know.

You, as an RN student haven't completed your education and EMT-B education is very, very basic. Once you graduate RN school, you won't be ready to work on your own. You'll go through your initial orientation time and then you'll still have about a YEAR of steep learning curve. Then at some point, you'll meet a new grad and you'll see just how much you didn't know...
 

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