Training Coordinator

ollie

Forum Crew Member
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Hello Everyone,
The company I work for is a small IFT company that recently started to do some backup 911 calls for the local 911 system, so my question is, besides the common things like VS and report taking how can I better prepare the EMTs to run 911, We have a drivers training program and everyone does some type of code 3 driving but as for our attendants how can we get them more comfortable being in the field and working alongside ALS? ( we have started a skills day refresher once a month)
Any advice will help.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Educator
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6,693
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Here’s a few thoughts…

- Use your QI process to determine areas where additional training would be beneficial.

- build a program of monthly continuing education to review less common procedures and equipment.

- talk to your local EMS council about education opportunities for your staff.

- teach classes on important, non clinical items, like documentation, customer service and how to better work with facilities.

- join the EMS training Officers group on Facebook for ideas and interaction with other EMS training folks.
 
OP
OP
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ollie

Forum Crew Member
94
0
6
Here’s a few thoughts…

- Use your QI process to determine areas where additional training would be beneficial.

- build a program of monthly continuing education to review less common procedures and equipment.

- talk to your local EMS council about education opportunities for your staff.

- teach classes on important, non clinical items, like documentation, customer service and how to better work with facilities.

- join the EMS training Officers group on Facebook for ideas and interaction with other EMS training folks.
Thank you for your reply, we usually discuss documentation regularly with regards to assessments and treatment protocols that the newer emts miss.
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
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In addition to the above suggestions, could you arrange ride-alongs for your EMTs with other BLS/ALS 911 agencies?
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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I've said it before, and I'll say it again: there is a huge difference between being a competent provider on a BLS truck in a 911 system, and being a competent paramedic helper. different expectations, different equipment, different objectives.

Couple that with the fact that your primary purpose is IFT, and it's even more complicated.

How do you clear attendants to work IFT solo? do you have a credentialing process, or is it just two shifts with an FTO and release to the wolves?

What is your ratio of IFT calls to 911? Making the assumption that it's 90% IFT and 10% 911, what do you think would be the best way to train all staff on rarely used skills?

How many poor clinical providers do you have working for your company? you know the type, the people that are good at holding grandma's hand and making her feel comfortable, but when she passes out, they will panic and not know what do to? how many providers would you trust to assess and treat your parents if they had chest pains? When I worked IFTs, there were some awesome people that I wouldn't want to trust my worst enemy.

The first thing I would recommend you do is to establish a baseline of your current training levels, and that will require you to evaluate your staff. run a simulated call, in private, with formal evaluators. use the NREMT paperwork if you need a checklist of things to look for. maybe even invite the ALS people so they can give an outside perspective. See where your weaknesses are and what you need to work on.

Once you have your crews comfortable with BLS stuff (patient assessment, BLS interventions), then reach out to your local ALS provider, and involve them in the ALS equipment. Review how to use their monitor (I'll be honest, I can work a lifepak 12 and 15, but if you throw a zoll at me, it's pretty embarrassing / think monkey and a football), how to start an IV drip, what the IV colors are, what the ALS expectations are of BLS personnel, etc. do they know how to set up an entitle system, and connect it to the monitor? It's outreach for the ALS agency, and it's viewed as a good thing when its done proactively.

Some might argue that 90% of the time, 911 and IFT are pretty much the same; but it's that 10% where the differences are significant, and that is why you should be training on those high-risk rarely used situations.
 

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
10,789
1,330
113
I've said it before, and I'll say it again: there is a huge difference between being a competent provider on a BLS truck in a 911 system, and being a competent paramedic helper. different expectations, different equipment, different objectives.

Couple that with the fact that your primary purpose is IFT, and it's even more complicated.

How do you clear attendants to work IFT solo? do you have a credentialing process, or is it just two shifts with an FTO and release to the wolves?

What is your ratio of IFT calls to 911? Making the assumption that it's 90% IFT and 10% 911, what do you think would be the best way to train all staff on rarely used skills?

How many poor clinical providers do you have working for your company? you know the type, the people that are good at holding grandma's hand and making her feel comfortable, but when she passes out, they will panic and not know what do to? how many providers would you trust to assess and treat your parents if they had chest pains? When I worked IFTs, there were some awesome people that I wouldn't want to trust my worst enemy.

The first thing I would recommend you do is to establish a baseline of your current training levels, and that will require you to evaluate your staff. run a simulated call, in private, with formal evaluators. use the NREMT paperwork if you need a checklist of things to look for. maybe even invite the ALS people so they can give an outside perspective. See where your weaknesses are and what you need to work on.

Once you have your crews comfortable with BLS stuff (patient assessment, BLS interventions), then reach out to your local ALS provider, and involve them in the ALS equipment. Review how to use their monitor (I'll be honest, I can work a lifepak 12 and 15, but if you throw a zoll at me, it's pretty embarrassing / think monkey and a football), how to start an IV drip, what the IV colors are, what the ALS expectations are of BLS personnel, etc. do they know how to set up an entitle system, and connect it to the monitor? It's outreach for the ALS agency, and it's viewed as a good thing when its done proactively.

Some might argue that 90% of the time, 911 and IFT are pretty much the same; but it's that 10% where the differences are significant, and that is why you should be training on those high-risk rarely used situations.
^^^ This with the caveat don't worry about the 10% difference until you're competent with the 90% similarities.
 
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