Look, its the ride along!

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jenskiez

Forum Ride Along
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Hey I'm Jenny and 17 ,I took my EMT-B class a couple months ago and did a couple of ride alongs which was quite interesting actually. Saw some buddies on their ride alongs too and of course shared our what-nots about the EMTs we were assigned to :p. So I'm curious, what do you guys think about ride alongs when they come to you, like your judgment about them?
 

Chief Complaint

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Hey I'm Jenny and 17 ,I took my EMT-B class a couple months ago and did a couple of ride alongs which was quite interesting actually. Saw some buddies on their ride alongs too and of course shared our what-nots about the EMTs we were assigned to :p. So I'm curious, what do you guys think about ride alongs when they come to you, like your judgment about them?

Im not a preceptor so my opinion doesnt matter too much here, but i can say that many of the people who show up for ride alongs around here shouldnt be allowed to.

I understand that we all have to start somewhere and that nobody is perfect, but its shocking how many students show up dressed like slobs, or without the required paperwork.

When it comes to patient care, again, we all have to start somewhere. But if you have never actually attempted an IV anything besides a dummy arm, how about you let us know that before you accept the offer to try it on a patient?
 

Handsome Robb

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Same as above, I'm fresh out of my FTO time, never ridden with a student but through my student experience and from my coworkers as the I on the unit usually B/I students are our "responsibility".

All my coworkers told me they take the Napoleonic view on it: "Incompetent until proven otherwise." If you have a bad attitude your going home. Look unprofessional, your going home. No paperwork, your going home. If you show up early and help the I with checkouts and what not they are going to be much more keen on letting you "play".

If your a wall-flower and don't ask any questions no one is going to let you do much of anything.
 
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DesertMedic66

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I understand that we all have to start somewhere and that nobody is perfect, but its shocking how many students show up dressed like slobs, or without the required paperwork.

We send those ride alongs home. If they don't have the required paperwork to ride out then they get sent home and their EMS instructor is made aware of the student being sent home and why. Then it's up to the EMS instructor on how it will be delt with. (for my college if the student gets sent home they will not be allowed to ride out with that division or service again).

If they do not show up in cloths that follow the dress code or are just complete slobs then they will once again be sent home with the above actions taken.

And if they get sent home there is a very strong possibility they will be out of the EMT program due to the required hours for ride outs not being met.

And it's the same in the class room. If they look like slobs they will be sent home for the day. If you miss 3 days of class or done keep the required 80% minimum grade then they are kicked from the program.
 

Sasha

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Hey I'm Jenny and 17 ,I took my EMT-B class a couple months ago and did a couple of ride alongs which was quite interesting actually. Saw some buddies on their ride alongs too and of course shared our what-nots about the EMTs we were assigned to :p. So I'm curious, what do you guys think about ride alongs when they come to you, like your judgment about them?

Around here you can tell what kind of student its going to be by what school they come from. One school is notorious for students who can't do a simple blood pressure, basic physical exam, etc. no matter what the level. (B students, P students) those students also are the bumps on a log who sit there and don't take initiative to do anything.

If you are the one standing in the corner while we work, you're going to be treated like you're not there. We aren't gonna go out of our way for you, but if you act interested and take initiative and seem like you want to learn, I will bend over backwards to teach you and let you do whatever you're allowed to do at school.

I also get really annoyed with students who know they need certain info for their reports on the patients and wait til the end to get their stuffed signed and want the ages, chief complaints, meds, Hx and vitals of all patients we transported that day while I'm trying to get done and clock out. That crap should be done while we are taking that patient, or even after while I'm finishing report. Not when I wanna go home! Grr.

Sent from LuLu using Tapatalk
 

crazycajun

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^^^^^^ This

I don't have a problem with students but for god sake don't just stand there like a deer caught in headlights. Also DO NOT SHOW UP dressed like you are going hang out with your buddies at sonic. It kills me to see someone show up not dressed appropriately thinking they should be allowed to interact with Pt's. And please be HONEST about your skill level. The last thing we need is you showing up and talking about everything you know only to find out you couldn't take a blood pressure if your life depended on it. With that said I have had some excellent students show up in the recent past. Nicely dressed and very capable of handling EMT responsibilities.
 

Sasha

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^^^^^^ This

I don't have a problem with students but for god sake don't just stand there like a deer caught in headlights. Also DO NOT SHOW UP dressed like you are going hang out with your buddies at sonic. It kills me to see someone show up not dressed appropriately thinking they should be allowed to interact with Pt's. And please be HONEST about your skill level. The last thing we need is you showing up and talking about everything you know only to find out you couldn't take a blood pressure if your life depended on it. With that said I have had some excellent students show up in the recent past. Nicely dressed and very capable of handling EMT responsibilities.

I hate that. That goes for partners too.

If you don't know how to do something, say it. Don't fake it. No one is going to think less of you for it.

Preceptors can't teach you something if they don't know that you don't know it.
 

truetiger

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Don't be the student who shows up with your shirt untucked, no stethoscope, and then palpate a BP of 130/80. It's also a bad idea to show up high on painkillers regardless of when you had your surgery.
 

dstevens58

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Speaking from the "student" standpoint, I can totally agree with everyone and everything that's been said. I take the initiative and find out what to where, if it is different from what the school said I have to wear.

So far, my preceptors have been fine, allowing me to do what I'm comfortable with. They did ask where I was at as far as learning and performing injections and starting IV's. And, I do take the extra effort to let them know and show them that I'm willing to do anything, including some of the er, less than glorious aspects of medical care.
 

Youngin

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Also DO NOT SHOW UP dressed like you are going hang out with your buddies at sonic.

Just out of curiosity, what should we wear? I start clinicals at the end of the month so I figured I'd ask.

Edit: I figure my instructor will cover this since we have a clinical orientation class type thing coming up as well, so it's not that big a deal.
 
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JPINFV

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When I was on a unit that got a student, I'd treat them like they were a new hire going through FTO period. Start off watching, and then slowly doing more throughout the day. During off times discuss things that they couldn't do due to liability issues like operating the gurney, etc.

All my coworkers told me they take the Napoleonic view on it: "Incompetent until proven otherwise." If you have a bad attitude your going home. Look unprofessional, your going home. No paperwork, your going home. If you show up early and help the I with checkouts and what not they are going to be much more keen on letting you "play".

If your a wall-flower and don't ask any questions no one is going to let you do much of anything.

Oh the huge irony.
 
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JPINFV

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Just out of curiosity, what should we wear? I start clinicals at the end of the month so I figured I'd ask.

Edit: I figure my instructor will cover this since we have a clinical orientation class type thing coming up as well, so it's not that big a deal.


What ever you are told to wear. When I did my ride alongs, it was black slacks, blue collared shirt.
 

Sasha

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When I was on a unit that got a student, I'd treat them like they were a new hire going through FTO period. Start off watching, and then slowly doing more throughout the day. During off times discuss things that they couldn't do due to liability issues like operating the gurney, etc.



Oh the huge irony.

No one likes a grammar nazi.

I don't think we're supposed too, but we allow students to operate an empty stretcher, practice putting it in, showing them proper lifting technique and correcting theirs. I also will allow them to put myself or my partner, depending on who weighs less, into the ambulance.
 
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NomadicMedic

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Ugh. I have an EMT student tonight. Wearing a fire department t shirt, jeans and sneakers. I asked him what they told him to wear, he said "this.". Also very disinterested in doing a truck/equipment check. Much more interested in watching UFC in our dayroom. I'll be sending an email to his instructor.
 

Handsome Robb

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Oh the huge irony.

Sorry. You're, Better? I can go find multiple posts from me about how English was never my strong subject in school if you'd like.

Get off your high horse, please. Cool, thanks.

Also, for being so pro-education thanks for responding to my PM about benzos. :rolleyes:

About uniforms, the service you're riding with will determine that. At my agency ride alongs wear black or blue slacks with a white polo and black shoes.
 
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JPINFV

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Also, for being so pro-education thanks for responding to my PM about benzos. :rolleyes:

PM responded. Answer: I'm honestly not sure. Also, ask anyone, I'm not the best at responding to PMs. It's too easy to say, "I'll respond next time I check the boards," and do that for days at a time.
 
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jenskiez

jenskiez

Forum Ride Along
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well yeah of course one shouldn't be in something they'd wear when they're lazy. When I went I had to wear black ****ies, boots, and a white polo shirt they issued us with a patch of ems and our school (program) name, tucked in and with a black belt. well what I was trying to ask was like how do you guys act with them (us ride alongs) and what do you guys think about when we do what we try to do. :wacko:
 

STXmedic

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It all depends on the student. Personally, I give them the benefit of the doubt at the start of the shift and let them prove me wrong. If they try and help out and are mildly competent or at least willing to learn, I just consider them another member of the crew. That said, I've sent plenty home who didn't seem like they wanted to be there.
 

Tigger

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Being the third rider is tough for the student and the crew. Unless the crew is taking students all the time, they're used to working as a two person team, and it's tough to figure out where the third person suddenly fits in. That can leave the student out of meaningful patient contacts without the crew really realizing it. It would be one thing if students got to ride with real FTOs, but from talking to partners and coworkers, most students just get assigned to a "regular" street crew so there might not be a lot of training given to the crew regarding precepting, at least for basic students.

When I get stuck in the FTO role, I sometimes find myself doing all the stuff I usually do and the new employee is left to do nothing but watch, which just isn't that helpful.
 
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