LFW: DFW or Houston area 911 EMTB?

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
161
9
18
Hopefully in a few months I'll have my certification in hand.

I'm looking to live in the outliers Houston or DFW, willing to do some commuting.

I've looked at EMTB jobs, but how do I know which ones do 911 calls? Are they all through the city directly or are they contracted out to other companies?

I've never lived on my own before, what kind of living quarters would be reasonable to pay for in an area I /probaby/ won't get mugged in? I know that's vague, just me myself and I living in the apartment or home, any advice welcomed.

I heard AMR is garbage? They treat employees poorly, is this true? Are there any companies to avoid?
 

RocketMedic

King of the Improbable
4,312
1,153
113
Both offer ample opportunities for work. Houston pay is better, but does have a higher cost of living to some degree. As for EMT-B 911, there are a lot of contracted privates, non profits, for profits, fire departments, etc. MedStar and AMR are the big non fire 911 departments in DFW. In Houston, you’ve got Cypress Creek EMS, Northwest EMS, Acadian (mostly IFT, 911 in Pasadena), a few of the local nonprofits like Lake Jackson and Clute. Also worth mentioning CHI St. Joseph’s EMS in Bryan, there’s a lot of rural 911 there and the crews are P/B.

In Houston, pay is realistically around 40k a year with normal overtime. DFW maybe 37k. CHI will let you work a lot, as will most privates.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
4,711
1,121
113
I'd get the job first, than look at housing. once you have your certification in hand, apply everywhere. you are too new to be picky about where you are working, and you're an entry level candidate with 0 experience. Unless the agency you get hired by has a horrible reputation, and by horrible reputation, I mean the sheer fact that you worked for that company will make you unhirable by others, if you get the job, take the job.

AMR likely does suck; however, working there will get you the experience to apply to a better server with 2 years of experience, compared to 0 real world experience. But they likely are easier to get hired at. But if Cypress Creek hires you, or Austin Travis (which I've heard good things about), or any other system, than see who gives you the most bang for your buck, and the best long term offer.

When I first got my own place, I went on craigslist, and found people who were renting rooms or subletting rooms in a multiple bedroom apartment. Everything I owned was in my bedroom, or still at my parents home. I had a FT job, which was close to where I lived. It was cheap, semi sketchy, and parking was an issue, but it was mine. Live there 6 months (it was only a 6 month lease), and then moved into a nicer place with horrible craigslist roommates. after a year, I was done, and got a 2 BR apartment about 7 minutes away (was hoping to have a roommate, but my first choice got married, and my second choice moved, so I settled for my first choice's BFF, who got knocked up by our married captain, and bailed leaving me with the whole apartment, including all the bills, after 3 weeks). But as long as I was within an hour's commute of my job (for 12 hour shifts), I was good. Of course, shorter is always better.

I don't know anything about you, but safety is important, however bad stuff happens in good neighborhoods too. and some live in projects and never have issues.

When I moved to NC, I knew no one. so once i had the job offer in hand, I asked the local EMS people for recommendations. They know the areas, and which areas to avoid. I checked out apartment complexes, and found one i liked. job sucked, so got another one which sucked less, but had backup plans. That's a big one, in case the job falls though, doesn't work out, sucks, then what are you going to do?
 

RocketMedic

King of the Improbable
4,312
1,153
113
Most of the services explicitly do want brand new EMTs, makes you easier to mold and do things their way. Creek has pretty high turnover and is all 911.

What are your overarching objectives?
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
161
9
18
I'd get the job first, than look at housing. once you have your certification in hand, apply everywhere. you are too new to be picky about where you are working, and you're an entry level candidate with 0 experience. Unless the agency you get hired by has a horrible reputation, and by horrible reputation, I mean the sheer fact that you worked for that company will make you unhirable by others, if you get the job, take the job.

AMR likely does suck; however, working there will get you the experience to apply to a better server with 2 years of experience, compared to 0 real world experience. But they likely are easier to get hired at. But if Cypress Creek hires you, or Austin Travis (which I've heard good things about), or any other system, than see who gives you the most bang for your buck, and the best long term offer.

When I first got my own place, I went on craigslist, and found people who were renting rooms or subletting rooms in a multiple bedroom apartment. Everything I owned was in my bedroom, or still at my parents home. I had a FT job, which was close to where I lived. It was cheap, semi sketchy, and parking was an issue, but it was mine. Live there 6 months (it was only a 6 month lease), and then moved into a nicer place with horrible craigslist roommates. after a year, I was done, and got a 2 BR apartment about 7 minutes away (was hoping to have a roommate, but my first choice got married, and my second choice moved, so I settled for my first choice's BFF, who got knocked up by our married captain, and bailed leaving me with the whole apartment, including all the bills, after 3 weeks). But as long as I was within an hour's commute of my job (for 12 hour shifts), I was good. Of course, shorter is always better.

I don't know anything about you, but safety is important, however bad stuff happens in good neighborhoods too. and some live in projects and never have issues.

When I moved to NC, I knew no one. so once i had the job offer in hand, I asked the local EMS people for recommendations. They know the areas, and which areas to avoid. I checked out apartment complexes, and found one i liked. job sucked, so got another one which sucked less, but had backup plans. That's a big one, in case the job falls though, doesn't work out, sucks, then what are you going to do?
What company has that bad a rep?

I'm definately looking at jobs first, I can get kind of "Cart before the horse", I know (Yes dad, this is looking at you)..

We've talked a bit before. Lone man EMT walking from their car after a late shift, not as much as a target as me. Before applying for jobs, I'm going to bulk up a little, but that doesn't escape my trim statue. Of course bad things happen in "good" neighborhoods, and living in a "bad" one doesn't mean "it" will ever be you, but I'm not going to go ignore the fact I'm less able to take on one or more older teenage guys, let alone men if I get jumped. So if I was going to chance it, I would rather live in an area where people weren't murdered (or any crime in general) nightly (Chicago, LA, Philly, here's looking at you).

Backup plan? Squirrel money away, keep my options open, keep my eyes peeled.

What are some red flags for prospective jobs?

Most of the services explicitly do want brand new EMTs, makes you easier to mold and do things their way. Creek has pretty high turnover and is all 911.

What are your overarching objectives?

I guess I want to do 911 for a few years, move up to EMT-A, then go to the police academy. Probaby sounds like a cringeworthy plan by y'all seasoned folks, but I want medical experience in general. Plus I think I can get a little peek the life without having to plan my life 30 years into the future.

I want to learn "it all". I want to help people, take some calls, do some good. Probaby what everyone wants when they're green.

I don't know
if I would call myself an adrenaline junkie, but I do want excitement and engaging work. If EMTs got to kick down doors daily, I wouldn't mind. (No, I don't expect that, much)

I never thought being new would be desirable, but when you put it like that, it only makes sense.
 

RocketMedic

King of the Improbable
4,312
1,153
113
Both Houston and DFW are relatively safe. And ccw is a thing here. Driving on 1960 is it’s own adrenaline rush.

Where are you now?
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
161
9
18
Both Houston and DFW are relatively safe. And ccw is a thing here. Driving on 1960 is it’s own adrenaline rush.

Where are you now?
I've had my LTC for coming up on two years, but a piece of plastic in your wallet or a chunk of metal in your pocket is a tool, not a guarantee.

I've never had to draw down on someone, I'd prefer to not live somewhere where it becomes a habit.

I'm in East Texas, about an hour from LA. Shreveport day trips are a thing.
 
Last edited:

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
4,711
1,121
113
What company has that bad a rep?
none of the ones listed, but I do know some places (not in texas) that if you apply for a job, and that company is on your resume, unless you have an internal reference vouching for you, your application gets thrown in the trash. Some places are just that bad, and their reputation can taint a good applicant.
So if I was going to chance it, I would rather live in an area where people weren't murdered (or any crime in general) nightly (Chicago, LA, Philly, here's looking at you).
while a fair statement, none of those cities are in the top 50 of most dangerous cities. Chicago is 57, Philly is 88, LA isn't even listed. Here is the current list, based on FBI information: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/blog/top100dangerous Houston is 53, Texarkana, TX is 34, and Beaumont is 64.
Backup plan? Squirrel money away, keep my options open, keep my eyes peeled.
good backup plan, but better to have the money squirrelled away before you need it. so if you can't afford 3 months of rent on 0 income, you don't have enough.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
161
9
18
none of the ones listed, but I do know some places (not in texas) that if you apply for a job, and that company is on your resume, unless you have an internal reference vouching for you, your application gets thrown in the trash. Some places are just that bad, and their reputation can taint a good applicant.
while a fair statement, none of those cities are in the top 50 of most dangerous cities. Chicago is 57, Philly is 88, LA isn't even listed. Here is the current list, based on FBI information: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/blog/top100dangerous Houston is 53, Texarkana, TX is 34, and Beaumont is 64.good backup plan, but better to have the money squirrelled away before you need it. so if you can't afford 3 months of rent on 0 income, you don't have enough.
Hmm. I'll mull this over. And yes, hopefully I'll have that much.

My dad said when starting a business, you need enough capital in the bank to have 0 revenue for an entire year. He's done that a few times.
 

Tx1Nguyen

Forum Ride Along
9
3
3
I'm looking at either MedStar FW or AMR Farmers Branch. Hopefully I can get onboard with either.
 
Top