How should one dress for an interview?

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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Chaps without buttocks and Mohawks over a denim vest and cowboy boots, festooned with ornamental shrapnel, and a Klingon metal sash. Assert your dominance early.

View attachment 4559
not gonna lie, if someone shows up to an interview with a baldric (which is the proper name for the klingon metal sash), no need to ask any questions, I'm offering the person the job.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
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not gonna lie, if someone shows up to an interview with a baldric (which is the proper name for the klingon metal sash), no need to ask any questions, I'm offering the person the job.
Too funny. I’d simply turn around and let HR escort them from the building.
 

Remi

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
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not gonna lie, if someone shows up to an interview with a baldric (which is the proper name for the klingon metal sash), no need to ask any questions, I'm offering the person the job.
Not sure if I’m impressed or disgusted that you know that.
 

RocketMedic

Earl of the Wheeled Chair
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Too funny. I’d simply turn around and let HR escort them from the building.
You would discriminate against someone based upon their cultural attire? How...terrible! I mean, on a serious note, what about a hijab or a turban or Mormon Jesus Jammies?
 
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DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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You would discriminate against someone based upon their cultural attire? How...terrible! I mean, on a serious note, what about a hijab or a turban or Mormon Jesus Jammies?
you know, I was going to say that.... with the Pastafarians being recognized as a religion, with as much validity as any other religion, rejecting someone because of their cultural or religious attire is likely to cause you to be on the losing end of a discrimination lawsuit (in case you were wondering, in the 23rd century, the Church of Trek became a full-blown religion dedicated to Star Trek).

And @Remi, I'll admit I had to look it up... but I knew there was a word for it, I just didn't know what it was called.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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Found this information online in a paramedics on facebook group.... while not entirely related to how to dress, it does provide some good information from a reported EMS administration. I do not endorse or condemn anything mentioned:
As an EMS Administrator who has hired well over 200 EMT’s and Paramedics, I’d like to share a little unsolicited advice. Take it or leave it.

1. Submit a resume with any application. Make sure it is formal, spaced correctly and with no spelling errors. You’re being considered for a position of great responsibility and authority, if you can’t handle putting together a single document professionally, how can you be trusted with keys to drugs and to run calls?

2. If you get an interview, show up 15 minutes early, wear a suit or business formal attire. Bring high quality copies of all of your certs that you can give to the interviewer.(Copies on a flash drive is an added bonus) Bring a blank notepad and a pen that works so you can take notes.

3. During the interview, be honest. A good interviewer already knows a LOT about you. Before I ever interviewed someone, I Googled them, searched for them on social media and when I found their profile I looked in their history for signs of racism, violent behavior, badmouthing previous employers, drug abuse, excessive alcohol use or a party lifestyle, mistreatment of animals, political extremism, affiliations with inappropriate organizations and on a personal level, how you worded your posts such as grammar and spelling as well as how you responded to people you disagreed with. I also called all the references and if you worked anywhere else local, I made phone calls and found out about you. Also, the ability to be honest and candid about the not-so-good things means you have learned from the experience and are very mature. (Most of the time)

4. You should be interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. Ask questions, take notes. Some good questions to ask include
- What is the turnover like here?
- How often do employees here receive performance reviews?
- Does this agency participate in any research or testing of new equipment/procedures/medications?
- How easy is it to speak with the medical director?
- Is there opportunity for advancement? What is the time frame for a new hire to be considered for promotions?
- How does continuing education work here? Is it paid?

Take some time to decide if this is really the agency you want to work for. Save any questions about pay/compensation for the end of the interview. If you ask about that early, it tells the interviewer you’re more interested in pay than being a good match for the company and a high quality clinician.

5. Shake peoples hands, look them in the eyes. If you’re asked a question that you need to think about, go ahead and think about it. It’s ok for there to be silence for a minute while you think. It’s annoying when someone keeps saying “um...well....uh....um....” as an interviewer, I ask questions that are hard on purpose. I’m not necessarily looking for this awesome and brilliant answer, I’m watching to see how you handle not knowing the answer.

6. Under NO circumstances should you say a cuss word during the interview. You may curse like a sailor once your hired, but, during the interview you’re being evaluated for professionalism.

7. Take the initiative to offer specific examples. Say you’re asked, “tell me what it means to you to be a good caregiver” don’t come back with the programmed answer of “Well, um, I always look out for my patients best interest and make sure I do a good job.” Instead try something like “That’s a good question, let me tell you about this call I ran a couple years ago when...(insert great story about being a good caregiver here) that to me was a good example of being a good caregiver because (insert your explanation here).”

8. Never badmouth anyone, including a previous agency you worked for, even if it is widely known that they are terrible. It is so unprofessional. A good thing to say is, “that agency faces a lot of challenges, I will say however I really did like the way they stocked the ambulances” (or any other positive thing you can speak about)

9. Any agency that offers you a job on the spot during the interview should raise a red flag for you. It usually means they are desperate for employees which in turn means they most likely have a high turnover...there’s usually a reason for that and it’s usually not good.

10. Say thank you when the interview is over. It’s totally appropriate to ask when you will be notified if you are hired or not. If you want to really nail it, make sure you get the contact information from the interviewer during the interview. Send the interviewer a brief email thanking them for the opportunity to interview. Keep it simple and make sure your contact information is in the signature of the email.
 

FiremanMike

EMS Coordinator
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As I understand it, most places will not be impressed if you show up in cargo pants and black boots.

I'll admit, I don't like slacks (mostly the lack of pockets and how tight they are) and I'm not really a fan of blouses.

Would a nice pair of jeans, cowboys boots and a pearl snap buttondown be sufficient for looking nice? (I'm in Texas, for reference).

I'd forgo the hat. (Unfortunately)

Supposing slacks are the way to go, (I'd have to go shopping, yuck), what kind of shoes go with that? I only have boots and 1 pair of tennis shoes. Thigh high suede, walking boots, old walking boots, shin high snow rated hunting boots, cowboy boots, EMS workboots...

Also, if hair is barely shoulder length, should it be put up?
Personally, I wear a full suit to interviews, always have.
 

Phillyrube

Forum Crew Member
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Be nice to the hired help. On the PD, the secretary and the custodian were asked about the appicant. He would mop the floor, if the applicant just walked over it, he got buzzed. Say excuse me, is there another way in, walk along the wall, etc, you got his vote. Point being, everyone you come in contact with is important.

Oh yea, leave your cellphone in the car.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
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Dress nice. You don't need a suit, but pressed trousers and shirt. Shined shoes. A jacket and tie for men.

Bring at least 5 copies of your resume.

Be able to answer the typical interview questions. Why do you want to work here. What's your biggest strength and weakness. Where do you see yourself in 5 years.

Always have a question or two to ask. Can be as simple as "can you tell me about the orientation process" or ask about things that are deal breakers for you. I recently interviewed a guy who said he was on the fence until I told him about education reimbursement.

Pay attention. Make eye contact. Shake hands. Dont fidget. Be prepared for the typical interview questions, including at least one ethics question.

It's not difficult.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Captain
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Dress nice. You don't need a suit, but pressed trousers and shirt. Shined shoes. A jacket and tie for men.

Bring at least 5 copies of your resume.

Be able to answer the typical interview questions. Why do you want to work here. What's your biggest strength and weakness. Where do you see yourself in 5 years.

Always have a question or two to ask. Can be as simple as "can you tell me about the orientation process" or ask about things that are deal breakers for you. I recently interviewed a guy who said he was on the fence until I told him about education reimbursement.

Pay attention. Make eye contact. Shake hands. Dont fidget. Be prepared for the typical interview questions, including at least one ethics question.

It's not difficult.
Why so many copies of the resume? And is this still the case if I submitted mine digitally? Should they be in a project kind of plastic protector or paper and staples?
 

DesertMedic66

Forum Troll
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Why so many copies of the resume? And is this still the case if I submitted mine digitally? Should they be in a project kind of plastic protector or paper and staples?
Even if you have uploaded one or already turned one in you should always bring multiple copies to an interview. Everyone at your interview should have your resume in front of them. Since you may not know how many people are at your interview bringing a decent amount is a good option.

I haven’t bothered placing any of my resumes in individual plastic sheets I will keep them all together in some kind of protective case usually a portfolio folder.

I do not do hiring for my company as that is a whole other department for us but I was always told to make sure your resumes are on high quality paper with non-faded black ink.
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
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Exactly. A resume for everyone at the table. It's usually 3 people at my department. Ops manager, HR rep and me.

And since we moved into the world of laser printers, paper and print quality isn't really an issue. It was more of a problem with crummy photocopies and originals on onionskin.
 

Martyn

Forum Asst. Chief
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When I had the interview for my present job, all I was wearing was my underpants and socks...(I was supposed to have a webcam interview but my manager called a few minutes before the kick off to say he'd have to conduct a phone interview as he was stuck on a construction site). As I'd just come off night duty I decided to get comfortable.
 
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