CPR Instructor?

Lo2w

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Wondering if anyone has done the part time/PRN instructor gigs as a side hustle. Seen some ads coming up lately that would make it worth it to get my instructor certs again.
 

mgr22

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Once your certs are in order, consider offering your services to a contractor instead of starting your own training business. Both can work, but being a third party reduces recordkeeping and risk.
 

CCCSD

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My question still stands. There are many out there who have an instructor card that can’t teach.
 

CCCSD

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Yep. However, you still need to be able to teach. That’s why I’m an ASHI Instructor, I actually teach concepts and share real world tips.
 

mgr22

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Your students should be filling out a critique after every class, enabling you to learn from your errors.
I found student feedback very helpful, but I didn't feel every comment was necessarily objective, sincere, and worth learning from. Now I'm noticing a trend that puts the onus for learning -- not just teaching -- on teachers, rather than students. Many students seem to be aware of that. Some take advantage.

More to your original point about being able to teach, I think teaching, like parenting, is largely a natural act for some but not for others. For most of the latter group, I don't think student feedback helps much.
 

johnrsemt

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Check out www.usajobs.gov for CPR Instructor jobs; Ft Leonard Wood in Missouri hired a CPR Instructor a couple of years ago; (that is all he does, teach and maintain paperwork) for a GS 09 pay position. $36K base, plus approx. 19% locality pay. Plus government benefits. I don't know of any other bases that do the same, but they are probably out there.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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I was an AHA CPR instructor for years. had my own equipment, etc. let it lapse when I moved down to NC, because it became too much of a hassle. When I started teaching for the college, got it again (wasted a day of my life in class) because they needed instructors, and was teaching for them, but recently let it expire because my county doesn't require a CPR cert, and I wasn't teaching any classes because I changed training centers. and, quite honestly, the market is saturated. If you have an established company, with regular contracts, you are golden, but with many people trying to go with cheapest way to get cards, it's really a buyers market.

That being said, it can be an easy side gig. work for a company on your days off, teach a class or two, user all of their materials, and go home at the end of the day. depending on where you work, you might not make much, but I found having someone else provide the equipment and handle all the paperwork is well worth the pay cut.
 

akflightmedic

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When I ran my own CPR instruction business in FL, I targeted the under served niche. Think of all the doctor offices that are 20 staff or less, think of dental clinics, same day surgery centers, eye doctors...target the very small practices with no extra staff scheduled routinely. These are the places which require CPR training, yet they cannot afford to lose staff during the work week.

I would then put together weekend courses. The docs or office managers were happy to pay some staff a few hours for a Saturday class, especially when I charged low prices. I consolidated office staff and would run a full Saturday, a full Sunday, or even abbreviated evening classes. They loved it! I direct marketed to them and never had an issue filling my rosters.

Summary: Do not forget the small businesses...lump them together and accommodate their schedule.

When I worked at a hospital back in 2000-ish era, I became even more fun and creative. A nurse friend of mine had a 5 bedroom house, which included a parlor area, two big living rooms and a nice enclosed patio in the FL weather.

So I organized a weekend ACLS, PALS, BLS refresher extravaganza. I had food catered, we had chill out areas, and basically set up separate rooms and spaces with dedicated instructor doing their thing on a canned loop. I advertised all over the hospital, charged a decent amount, because what I was selling was fun, relaxed and convenience. It went very well and I made out pretty decent cash wise even after paying my instructors. I never did this again, but it truly was an awesome experience. Just random food for thought from someone who has been there, done that.
 

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
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I became an AHA instructor in July.

I don't see how it makes financial sense unless you buy out an established business with a large customer base.
 

mgr22

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I became an AHA instructor in July.

I don't see how it makes financial sense unless you buy out an established business with a large customer base.
I made decent money as a self-employed ACLS instructor. Other instructors sub-contracted to me.
 

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
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Have you worked as an instructor recently?

Course costs went up and class sizes decreased. It's not the same as when I first became an instructor in 2005 or so.

If you have a network of potential clients, a free facility where you can teach classes, and can fill seats, you might be okay.
 

mgr22

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No, I haven't worked as an instructor recently, but I've been invited to. Classes would have been 8-15 students.

I'm not talking about doing this full time; however, the hourly pay was considerably more than I was making as a medic.
 
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