ambulance driving

emtwacker710

Forum Captain
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Ok, after some troubles at my home squad, I have to ask you guys, what is your squads policy on driving the rig? This is mainly for vol. agencies I am asking. The reason being because we have many new members who are not EMTs yet and the officers are sterotyping due to age thinking that they cannot drive correctly or do not have the ability to drive the rig, I myself have gone through this problem and am actually going through it again..let me know what you guys think..
 

BossyCow

Forum Deputy Chief
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On our volly squad, no one drives a rig until they have passed EVAP. They have to be checked out on each rig by an officer and okayed to drive each individual rig. As rigs are replaced, no one drives the new rig until an officer checks them out on the operation of it and does a practice ride with them. This is to be in compliance with our insurance regs and district policies and procedures.
 

mdtaylor

Forum Crew Member
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Policy is....when you are told you can drive, then you can.

Driving someone else' equipment is a privilege and not a right. It is up to them to determine when an individual is ready to put others lives in their hands, and risk the lives of private citizens.

Driving emergency responses is not something that should magically happen at any given age or after x number of hours of training. It must also include the opinion of the experienced personnel that you work with.
 

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
Community Leader
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At my private service you could drive if you were 18. You walked in your first day and started driving with no training. They'd then put you through the EVOC course during the summer.

If I were to run an EMS agency, I'd make it so that you had to be 21+.
 

hitechredneckemt

Forum Crew Member
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I agree with new people being check out on driving skills but as far as getting a new rig who checks out the officers
 

Ridryder911

EMS Guru
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23 years of age, attended an EVOC course, then after MVR and after another EVOC (companies) and recommendation of an FTO (several calls).. then one is released.

R/r 911
 

jordanfstop

Forum Lieutenant
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19 minimum, clean driving record, must be cleared in back of rig for six months, must be cleared for Code 3 driving, must know the area well, strict observation from Captain and 1st Lt, pass EVOC once cleared for driving.
 

paramedix

Forum Lieutenant
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Our company you have to be older than 21 and be in possession of a valid PrDP-P&G license. If you do not have that there is no chance of driving and you could be suspended from service, not even riding as a passenger. (This is for the ambos, the fly cars are different.)

We do not have volunteers, but "paid volunteers". If you work for us on a part time basis you get paid for that shift or period you have worked. These "paid volunteers" as a rule are not allowed to drive even with the PrDP, unless the branch managers gives permission or the shift leader (ALS on duty) gives permission.

Two "paid volunteers" are not allowed to work on the same vehicle, as one needs to be permanently employed, but again, depends on the situation at hand.
 

Ops Paramedic

Forum Captain
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Ditto on paramedix's post for me. We are not big on the expert driver training (Sadly) this side, and thus the trainig that you get is just enough to pass your driver permit test. The Prdp is just paperwork, no driver evaluation involved. I find often that people are in possesion of the correct paperwork and permits, but still cannot drive...
 

oldfiredog

Forum Ride Along
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18 years old , evoc, cleared by an officer
We have several who will never be cleared to drive an emergency vehicle.:rolleyes:
 

Res1cue

Forum Ride Along
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At work you may drive as soon as you are hired so long as you posses your EVOC certification. If you have the common sense to pass an EVOC course, you have the common sense to drive an emergency vehicle. It isn't a hard concept, get in the ambulance and drive. Most EMT-B courses now include a specific section relating to emergency vehicle driving.

If you're on a volly squad and they won't "let" you drive, go somewhere that will.
 

JPINFV

Gadfly
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Driving is over rated anyways. If I had to drive all the time, or attend all the time, I'd rather attend. I wouldn't mind attending every call if the service is slow (otherwise it's nice to be able to trade off). Start throwing me around in the back, though, and the unit will be transporting non-emergent regardless of the patient's status.
 

BossyCow

Forum Deputy Chief
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I agree with new people being check out on driving skills but as far as getting a new rig who checks out the officers

With a new rig at my agency, officers are checked out during the inservice given when delivery of the rig is taken.
 

Jon

Administrator
Community Leader
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My vollie squad has a very regimented program. First, you must be AT LEAST 18, and hold a valid driver's license for at least 2 years.

Level 1 requires at least 1 hour in each ambulance, and a visit to our commonly visited hospitals.
Level 2 requires at least 10 emergent responses in the territory, half in town, and half in the surrounding areas.
Level 3 is the ONLY level where you can transport a patient. It requires at least 10 emergent responses in the territory, half in town, and half in the surrounding areas.
 

WuLabsWuTecH

Forum Deputy Chief
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My vollie squad has a very regimented program. First, you must be AT LEAST 18, and hold a valid driver's license for at least 2 years.

Level 1 requires at least 1 hour in each ambulance, and a visit to our commonly visited hospitals.
Level 2 requires at least 10 emergent responses in the territory, half in town, and half in the surrounding areas.
Level 3 is the ONLY level where you can transport a patient. It requires at least 10 emergent responses in the territory, half in town, and half in the surrounding areas.
so how does one get from level 2 to level 3? It seems they have the same requirements?
 

Jon

Administrator
Community Leader
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Level 2 is driving TO the call... level 3 is driving the WHOLE call, including the patient transport.

You need to get signed off by 2 preceptors/supervisors to move between levels.
 
OP
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emtwacker710

Forum Captain
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Driving is over rated anyways. If I had to drive all the time, or attend all the time, I'd rather attend. I wouldn't mind attending every call if the service is slow (otherwise it's nice to be able to trade off). Start throwing me around in the back, though, and the unit will be transporting non-emergent regardless of the patient's status.

Oh yes I agree, but there are times when drivers are needed and because of our lack of rules and a system to clear drivers we dont always have them available so then we have to tone out the FD for a driver and wait
 

paramedix

Forum Lieutenant
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To add another point regarding the driver issue. Ops paramedic touched on this point.

If , big if, we are lucky to receive advanced driving or being trained in driving skills, they are usually in the wrong vehicle.

Example, they would train the ambulance technicians to respond or drive in a small sedan where they are used to a Sprinter, Quantum etc. Some of the flycars that we use are Golf GTI or RunX etc, now these guys are trained on something totally different or A class.

Good training, but wrong vehicle. The driver need to be a good diver as well, as training can mean nothing if you cant drive. There are only a few people that I feel comfortable responding with, fast and careful.
 

KEVD18

Forum Deputy Chief
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in ma, you have to be 18 to get your ticket, and since we require both driver and attendant to be emts, "minimum 18y/o" goes hand in hand. i also think setting a arbitrary number to it is bs anyway. each person should be evaluated for maturity and competence individually. i have met some really mature 18y/o's and some grossly incompetent people 23 and up. as senior citizens say, age is just a number.

one company i worked for had evoc as part of the orientation. after that, there was a very ritualistic(bordering on hazing) process by which your first partner dangled driving in front on you like a fricken carrot, meanwhile never attending a call(thus never doing any p-work).

another company handed you the keys the minute you walked in the door. evoc was used as a threat. "screw up and you'll have to take evoc". there truck are always banged up. sad really...

yet another company had a very unofficial policy on new hire driving. some people drove their first day, other waited and attended for six months, others three. it was insanity. no set procedure for training, and when you did get the keys, the unofficial company policy was drive it like its a lease(which it was...)
 
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