Patient is armed

Tx1Nguyen

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Based off my own personal experience as the pt following a MVA, I told the responding LEO that I was carrying and told him the location of my weapon. He then secured and cleared my weapon, gave it to the Paramedics and they had the hospital police lock up my firearm when I got transported.
 

DragonClaw

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Based off my own personal experience as the pt following a MVA, I told the responding LEO that I was carrying and told him the location of my weapon. He then secured and cleared my weapon, gave it to the Paramedics and they had the hospital police lock up my firearm when I got transported.
And getting your weapon after?
 

RocketMedic

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Yeah I want as few firearms in the back as possible.
 

DragonClaw

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Yeah I want as few firearms in the back as possible.
Having come from no experience aside from textbooks and a few anecdotes (AKA correct me if I'm wrong) , isn't it far more likely for you you meet Mr PCP or violent drunk than LTC/CCW/CHL (And then, what about constitutional carry states) with broken arm or such? I'm armed dang near 24/7, never once in my life an ambulance.

But I guess if I was on 6th street in Austin and some barfight had us out there and the pt had a suspicious bulge, okay. But I guess I'm not as much concerned if it's a permitted individual and he's got a normal LOC and we're settling things. Maybe it's me not being concerned enough.


Not that I Want a lot of firearms in the back, because that does increase potential danger.
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
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I called the hospital police logistics office and they checked my ID, and gave it back.
That's how it should go but some states don't think that's exactly OK. At least in California, a firearm that is given to Law Enforcement for safekeeping/storage must go through the LEGR (Law Enforcement Gun Release) process. Basically you fill out a form, pay a fee, have another background check done (as if you just bought your gun again), and once you receive a clearance letter in the mail, you can then take that to the LE Agency that's got your gun (during times they do gun returns) and retrieve it... A big headache.
 

DragonClaw

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That's how it should go but some states don't think that's exactly OK. At least in California, a firearm that is given to Law Enforcement for safekeeping/storage must go through the LEGR (Law Enforcement Gun Release) process. Basically you fill out a form, pay a fee, have another background check done (as if you just bought your gun again), and once you receive a clearance letter in the mail, you can then take that to the LE Agency that's got your gun (during times they do gun returns) and retrieve it... A big headache.
Amen.
 

Tx1Nguyen

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That's how it should go but some states don't think that's exactly OK. At least in California, a firearm that is given to Law Enforcement for safekeeping/storage must go through the LEGR (Law Enforcement Gun Release) process. Basically you fill out a form, pay a fee, have another background check done (as if you just bought your gun again), and once you receive a clearance letter in the mail, you can then take that to the LE Agency that's got your gun (during times they do gun returns) and retrieve it... A big headache.
I mean I see why they’d do that. At the time of my accident I was a patrol Supervisor with a Private Security company. I gave them my Texas DPS Commissioned Officer license as well.
 

DragonClaw

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I mean I see why they’d do that. At the time of my accident I was a patrol Supervisor with a Private Security company. I gave them my Texas DPS Commissioned Officer license as well.
I can't. You've done nothing wrong, you're not a criminal because you need an ambulance. It's yours, it should be simple to get it back or they're literall thieves.

It's nice and all you've got more papers, but that shouldn't affect anything.
 

Tx1Nguyen

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I can't. You've done nothing wrong, you're not a criminal because you need an ambulance. It's yours, it should be simple to get it back or they're literall thieves.

It's nice and all you've got more papers, but that shouldn't affect anything.
For me it was simple as requesting it back. For others it seems like buying a firearm all over again.
 

DrParasite

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I can't. You've done nothing wrong, you're not a criminal because you need an ambulance. It's yours, it should be simple to get it back or they're literall thieves.
In theory, yes, however from a liability potential, it's much more complicated from their point of view.

Hypothetically speaking, if they give you back your firearm, and you are a convicted felon then they have provided a firearm to a bad guy, and could be liable for any actions that you commit with it. Or if you shouldn't have had a firearm to begin with, because you have two outstanding warrants for domestic abuse, so if they give you back your gun, and you use it to shoot someone, whose to blame? Also, many civilian security agencies have a less than stellar lost and found program (i won't even go into my story about when hospital security found my wallet, and that same hospital security didn't bother to even look me up in the hospital directory to tell me they found it....) , so they don't want the liability for giving a firearm, so they turn it over to PD, which adds another level of security that you need to go through to obtain your property.

While it sounds like a simple process, the lawyers in this country have complicated things greatly.
 

SnakeDocNC

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If the pt is a ccw holder and his chief complaint or injury is not near the weapon then work around it to provide life saving interventions. If possible ask the pt to make the weapon safe as quickly as possible.

Now if the pt is unconscious and there is no threat around, ie I find the weapon concealed during you assessment, then I have no problem removing the weapon making it safe and turning it over to Leo when they arrive. I have a higher than normal knowledge of firearms so I am comfortable with this. If you are not familiar with firearms don’t touch them.

Follow your state and district protocol. Keep yourself and tour partner safe. Don’t make a mountain out of a mole hill. In today’s EMS almost the only time you will find a weapon when LEO not already on scene is with a ccw
 
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