IBSC

SandpitMedic

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I was just logging in to the IBSC to check on my date for renewal for my FP-C. Man, they have like 10 certifications now. Wilderness paramedic-certified? Lol? Medical transportation control? Designated infection control officer?

IBSC really watering down. What a shame; they should have stopped at community and tactical. I got my FP-C back before IBSC- I don’t even remember what the board was called. They should have kept it to critical care and flight to be honest.

Rant over.
 
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SandpitMedic

SandpitMedic

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Everyone needs a Badge…
Why be a just a paramedic. You could be a tactical flight community wilderness medic with bonus certification in infection control.

Tons of jobs out there for that. You’re basically a doctor.
 
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SandpitMedic

SandpitMedic

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DB189D2F-B751-476D-8664-1A894CF8057E.png
 

CCCSD

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Why be a just a paramedic. You could be a tactical flight community wilderness medic with bonus certification in infection control.

Tons of jobs out there for that. You’re basically a doctor.
I am.
I challenged them and awarded myself an M Diety.
 

EpiEMS

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The idea of certifications in these fields (assuming it's rigorous) actually makes a lot of sense for employers...
 

ffemt8978

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The idea of certifications in these fields (assuming it's rigorous) actually makes a lot of sense for employers...
The problem with this is that over time, employers don't care about the quality of the certification as long as it is obtained and checks the box in the HR file.
 

Carlos Danger

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I got my FP-C back before IBSC- I don’t even remember what the board was called.


I want to say BCCTPC?

Googled a little, and yes, it was BCCTPC.

Before BCCTPC it was called the NFPA - the National Flight Paramedics Association, and the credential was called the CFP - Certified Flight Paramedic.

Originally, in order to be eligible to sit for the exam you had to provide documentation of formal training in critical care (CCEMTP or similar course), as well as experience in the CCT realm. It was the dropping of those eligibility requirements that really neutered the credibility and usefullness of the credential, IMO. The idea of "certifying" individuals in a subspecialty in which they possess no experience or training never sat well with me (selfish of me, I know), but it's obvious why the idea appealed to the board: fewer eligibility requirements = more folks taking the exam = more revenue.
 

DrParasite

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It's not just IBSC; in the IT world, there are soooo many certs (this is a great pic of just the security certs https://pauljerimy.com/security-certification-roadmap/). Many companies that are known for one or two good certs, have expanded to include certifications on multiple related topics. Certifications, particularly the annual maintenance feels or renewal fees are huuuuge money makers for these companies, and the more certs they can offer, the more money they can make off people.

The real question everyone needs to make is does the particular certification have a good ROI? meaning, will you get back the time and money you spend to maintain and earn the cert? Because for plenty, they don't have a good ROI at all.
 

Rubicon Bob

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Before BCCTPC it was called the NFPA - the National Flight Paramedics Association, and the credential was called the CFP - Certified Flight Paramedic.

Originally, in order to be eligible to sit for the exam you had to provide documentation of formal training in critical care (CCEMTP or similar course), as well as experience in the CCT realm. It was the dropping of those eligibility requirements that really neutered the credibility and usefullness of the credential, IMO. The idea of "certifying" individuals in a subspecialty in which they possess no experience or training never sat well with me (selfish of me, I know), but it's obvious why the idea appealed to the board: fewer eligibility requirements = more folks taking the exam = more revenue.

I believe you are incorrect, as I believe the BCCTPC was started in 2000, specifically for the FP-C, by NFPA (but separate).

I took the CCEMTP class in 2002, and in 2003 I attended a FP-C "prep course" (for the Con-Ed toward my CCEMT-P) and trust me, the vast majority of the people there taking the "prep course" for the FP-C had not already had any formal class, such as the CCEMTP class

In fact, I was the only person there that had taken the CCEMTP class.

This is how I remember it, but perhaps I remember it incorrectly.

I still maintain my FP-C, CCP-C, and CCEMT-P
 

Carlos Danger

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I believe you are incorrect, as I believe the BCCTPC was started in 2000, specifically for the FP-C, by NFPA (but separate).

I took the CCEMTP class in 2002, and in 2003 I attended a FP-C "prep course" (for the Con-Ed toward my CCEMT-P) and trust me, the vast majority of the people there taking the "prep course" for the FP-C had not already had any formal class, such as the CCEMTP class

In fact, I was the only person there that had taken the CCEMTP class.

This is how I remember it, but perhaps I remember it incorrectly.

I still maintain my FP-C, CCP-C, and CCEMT-P
The CFP was definitely awarded directly by the NFPA from the time that the credential was instituted (late 2000 or early 2001) until at least the middle of 2002, when I took it. In late 2002 or early 2003, the NFPA was issued a cease and desist by lawyers for the organization that administered the Certified Public Accountant (CFP) credential for infringement on the "CFP" title. At that time the NFPA changed the name of the credential to FP-C and birthed the BCCTPC for legal reasons. Somewhere in this time frame they also started the prep course and dropped the education and experience requirements.
 
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SandpitMedic

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So much wisdom and history. Is the saying wisdom comes with age? 😂
 
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I know one thing. I’ll never that FPC go. That test was harder than the PANCE (PA National Certification Exam).
 

Rubicon Bob

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The CFP was definitely awarded directly by the NFPA from the time that the credential was instituted (late 2000 or early 2001) until at least the middle of 2002, when I took it. In late 2002 or early 2003, the NFPA was issued a cease and desist by lawyers for the organization that administered the Certified Public Accountant (CFP) credential for infringement on the "CFP" title. At that time the NFPA changed the name of the credential to FP-C and birthed the BCCTPC for legal reasons. Somewhere in this time frame they also started the prep course and dropped the education and experience requirements.

I will defer to you then, as you were "there" at that time, and I came in just after.

Thank you for the history, that I was unaware of.

Always good to learn something new.
 

Carlos Danger

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So much wisdom and history. Is the saying wisdom comes with age? 😂
Wisdom, a sore back, a nearly daily desire for naps, all of it comes with age....

I know one thing. I’ll never that FPC go. That test was harder than the PANCE (PA National Certification Exam).
I wouldn't have let mine go either, but I had to let my NRP go due to the NREMT's archaic and self-defeating recertification requirements, which I simply didn't have time to meet during grad school when I was spending 40+ hours per week in clinical in addition to studying for exams. Not having active registration meant that I couldn't renew my state certification the following year, which of course meant that my FPC and other credentials had to be let go. I would have liked to have stayed involved in EMS in some capacity - likely, flying and educating part time, maybe going to a conference or two each year with my HEMS program - but I haven't quite been able to bring myself to jump through all the hoops that I'd have to jump through in order to get my EMS credentials back.
 

Tigger

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I loosely followed the development of the wilderness paramedic certification and my impression at least is that it’s a solid, modern certification.

Is there lots of value to it? I have no idea. I know several physicians who have personal interests in wilderness medicine and have taken fellowships to that effect. If a paramedic also has a similar interest and wants to study it, I don’t see a lack of value in a vetted certification designed by actual subject matter experts.
 

Summit

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“Vetted” vs online and print being the key.
Exactly. Got a license/cert and pass a test, you are good to go. No course, practical, clinical or experience requirements.

WP-C, I can sit for that with a nursing license, no courses, clinicals, nor experience (kind of like most WEMT courses will let in any level of provider above EMT). The difference is there is an WEMT course curriculum endorsed by WMS.

DICO, at $400 test for NAPSICO, a group nobody in the field has heard of... and is <10 years old. CBIC is an internationally recognized multidisciplinary board for the field and is partnered with APIC, IPAC Canada, and IFIC. It was founded by APIC. They have some better expectations.
 
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