I panicked

Steveb

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I'm 14 and a voulenteer in a program that the service offers. We were at a community event.this was my first call. it was late and I was heading out to the bus stop I gave my kit and radio to another voulenteer and headout when a security guard stoped me and told me someone had fell down the stairs I ran to the Vic. And my partener was on his way.I pedestriens where applying pressure to his head where the blood was I spoke with a pedestrien to find out what happened. My pataner comes and applys and helps the pedestrians control the blood loss. I. Flaged down two senoir members and started on the paper work. I felt that I wasn't thinking right how do I avoid no to do this on my next call.

Typed from my blackberry sorry for errors.
 

DesertMedic66

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Experience and making sure you know what you have been trained to do. The more calls and patient contacts you get, you will become more comfortable with treating the patient.
 

akflightmedic

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First, I am so sick of the excuse that "I typed this from (insert device) please excuse all the errors". Just saying...if you cannot take the time to compose your thoughts properly regardless of device being used, then I do not care. It is not a free pass to misspell, be incoherent and have horrific grammar.

Now we got that out of the way....you are 14. Focus on school, EMS will be there later. Why is this relevant? Because you asked...you panicked. Part of not panicking is being older, more mature, having life experiences and the EDUCATION to know how to approach a scene, manage it and perform the proper care.

You state you ran to the scene. Never run to a scene. All it does is increase your heart rate, increase your breathing, clouds your mind...and causes you to panic and not remember what to do. See...that was easy!

Anyways, the call at your level is pretty straight forward. Protect yourself with gloves, if it is bleeding...apply pressure...call for help.
 

JPINFV

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To the OP, pick up a copy of the book The House of God (the name is a parody of Beth Israel Medical Center in Boston. It isn't a religious book) by Samuel Shem. It should be required reading for anyone looking at going into a health care field, especially the Fat Man's Laws of the House of God. In this case Law 3, "At a cardiac arrest, the first procedure is to take your own pulse" is the most pertinent lesson.


First, I am so sick of the excuse that "I typed this from (insert device) please excuse all the errors".
I agree... it's not that hard and depending on where I am I also post from my iPhone. I just don't use Tapa (why pay anything if Safari works just as well?) so no one knows that I'm posting from a iPhone.
 

AMF

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You state you ran to the scene. Never run to a scene. All it does is increase your heart rate, increase your breathing, clouds your mind...and causes you to panic and not remember what to do. See...that was easy!
Well I wouldn't say that, necessarily... if you're under excess duress, you're not helping your patient, but those of us w/o emergency vehicles can't really afford to walk. I would say, though, once you approach the scene, walk. Take some time to put on your gloves and go through your scene safety/c-spine/resources clearances.
 

Veneficus

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Well I wouldn't say that, necessarily... if you're under excess duress, you're not helping your patient, but those of us w/o emergency vehicles can't really afford to walk.
Always walk.

Running inspires panic. Bringing calm is part of scene management.

In addition to the mental impairment from adrenaline, there is also the loss of fine motor skills.

The patient will be there when you get there, and if not, there will be another call sooner or later.
 

DesertMedic66

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Always walk.

Running inspires panic. Bringing calm is part of scene management.

In addition to the mental impairment from adrenaline, there is also the loss of fine motor skills.

The patient will be there when you get there, and if not, there will be another call sooner or later.
Agreed. It's not your emergency. If you run and somehow get injured while running then you just caused another patient.
 

JPINFV

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I think it needs to be pointed out that the original poster was walking to the bus stop to go home, which I don't think is entirely unreasonable for a 14 year old depending on the individual.
 

emt seeking first job

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I think it needs to be pointed out that the original poster was walking to the bus stop to go home, which I don't think is entirely unreasonable for a 14 year old depending on the individual.
My bad.

Even still. The young people should have assembled at the agency's headquaters, arrived and departed as a group in an agency vehicle.

This is in no way the OP's fault. I blame the adults.
 

Sasha

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My bad.

Even still. The young people should have assembled at the agency's headquaters, arrived and departed as a group in an agency vehicle.

This is in no way the OP's fault. I blame the adults.
?????

Or.... they make their own way to work, like every other job.
 

Tigger

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My bad.

Even still. The young people should have assembled at the agency's headquaters, arrived and departed as a group in an agency vehicle.

This is in no way the OP's fault. I blame the adults.
Or they could have gone home like normal teenagers. Which they did. The fact that he was at a youth EMS post meeting only meant that trained help was at the patient's side quicker than normal. Do you suggest that 14 year olds travel in packs in an agency vehicle at all time since an emergency could crop up at any time?
 

emt seeking first job

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Or they could have gone home like normal teenagers. Which they did. The fact that he was at a youth EMS post meeting only meant that trained help was at the patient's side quicker than normal. Do you suggest that 14 year olds travel in packs in an agency vehicle at all time since an emergency could crop up at any time?

Yes, I do. So they don't get flag down for one. Usually such events require set up, take down and transport of equipment and supplies.

If they are going to an event. Yes. Not in general.
 

NYMedic828

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Yes, I do. So they don't get flag down for one. Usually such events require set up, take down and transport of equipment and supplies.

If they are going to an event. Yes. Not in general.
If i was an untrained individual and encountered a medical emergency, my first reaction probably would not be to flag down the first high school freshman i could find in the street...
 

DesertMedic66

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?????

Or.... they make their own way to work, like every other job.
Yep. I started out at 14 y/o. At our events we had scheduled times and had to get to and from the event our own way.
 

Sasha

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DesertMedic66

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And they can leave their phones at the base so they are not texting the whole time and (cough cough) keep the stretcher from 'just' dumping the poor patient.
And then an emergency happens and since they don't have their phones they can call for help..
 

Steveb

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Should'nt an adult be with you at all times?
No we are trained reptedly I just happen to be the yougest most are 16. And trained at the emergency first responder level. I just started last mid year.
 
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