how many medics intermediates

are you

  • emt-st

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • emt-i

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • emt-cc

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • emt-p

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1

medic 4-2

Forum Probie
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i just wanna know the ratio to als to bls
 

usafmedic45

Forum Deputy Chief
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Actually shouldn't that be the number of BLS, ILS and ALS providers. Because an Intermediate is either ILS or ALS (and the matter of which one really depends on what state you are in), not BLS. But around here, the ILS service level is a totally seperate level from ALS services
 

SafetyPro2

Forum Safety Officer
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Basic here. For the most part, California's a two tier system (Basic & Medic). EMS is primarily regulated at the county level, and only a few of the rural counties offer Intermediate (and that's being phased out, so I've been told).

Of course, in CA nomenclature, a Basic is an EMT-I (Roman numeral 1, but easily mistaken for Intermediate elsewhere) and an Intermediate is an EMT-II. That's why I cheat and write it as "EMT-1" instead.
 

rescuecpt

Community Leader Emeritus
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EMT-CC (ALS)
 

vtemti

Forum Captain
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Vermont is in a class all by itself. They use the National Registry curriculum for ease on initial cert, but then adopt there own ways for added confusion. Intermediate is considered ALS with Critical Care and Paramedic levels being ACLS. Why they can't just recognize the National Registry is beyond me. :blink:
 

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
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Try Washington. Here we have the following levels:

EMT-FR
EMT-B
EMT-B/ETC
EMT-B/Airway
EMT-IV
EMT-IV/Airway
EMT-ILS
EMT-ILS/Airway
EMT-P

I think I got all of them, but I'm not sure. The EMT-P is the only one that conforms to NREMT standards.
 

Stevo

Forum Asst. Chief
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good grief ffemt8978, and i thought we were confused!
 

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
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Actually, once you understand the system it gives your medical director tremendous flexibilty in staffing. How many states do you know let EMT-B's do ET tubes (EMT-B/Airway)?

The difference between EMT-IV and EMT-ILS is similar to the NREMT-I/85 and NREMT-I/99.
 

usafmedic45

Forum Deputy Chief
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The idea of basic EMT's intubating makes this RT's skin crawl. Back to regularly scheduled posting....
 

rescuecpt

Community Leader Emeritus
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Originally posted by usafmedic45@Jul 6 2005, 12:05 AM
The idea of basic EMT's intubating makes this RT's skin crawl. Back to regularly scheduled posting....
I dunno, it's really not that hard.... look, find the hole, stick the tube through the hole, do a few simple tests to make sure you're really in the hole, and then do the happy dance. :D
 

007medic

Forum Lieutenant
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rescue...
you hope to god that you got it in the right hole, so you don't have to worry with flying puke.
 

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
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Originally posted by 007medic@Jul 6 2005, 03:00 PM
you hope to god that you got it in the right hole
Had to read that part twice. :eek:
 

usafmedic45

Forum Deputy Chief
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Originally posted by 007medic@Jul 6 2005, 05:00 PM
you hope to god that you got it in the right hole
Have you personally had big problems with things winding up in the wrong hole 007Medic? :lol:

(Sorry, but that was too good to not say something about) :p

But seriously my only reason for not thinking that Basic EMT's should be allowed to intubate is that there are very suitable alternatives (Combitube for example)with no risk of damage to teeth from the use of a laryngoscope or far less risk of misplacement of the adjunct. Also the only real major benefit that an ET tube possess (in the prehospital setting) is the possibility of administering drugs down the tube (which by the way is going to be no longer recommended by the new ACLS standards) and the last time I checked EMT-B's could not administer medications that can be given via the endotracheal route.
 

Phridae

Forum Asst. Chief
532
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In Wisconsin its

-B
-IV-tech (me)
-I
-P

So I can't vote. :(

I didn't want to anyways.
 

Wingnut

EMS Junkie
2,027
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Originally posted by 007medic@Jul 6 2005, 05:00 PM

you hope to god that you got it in the right hole
You know, sometimes that can be fun.. ;)


We only have Basics and paramedics here, they keep it pretty simple.
 

rescuecpt

Community Leader Emeritus
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Originally posted by 007medic@Jul 6 2005, 05:00 PM
rescue...
you hope to god that you got it in the right hole, so you don't have to worry with flying puke.
You shouldn't have to hope, one of the criteria is to visualize the tube passing through the cords - no hoping involved. You don't see it happen, you shouldn't even proceed to the next step.

And, more than flying puke, I'd worry more about killing my patient through esophageal intubation if I couldn't confirm I got the tube in the right "hole".
 

emtI

Forum Crew Member
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I am an EMT-I on a BLS service. I cannot operate outside my protocols. They do allow me to initiate IV, do glucometers and nebulizers, both of which B's can now do in our state, and really that's about it that's different from what a Basic can do.
 

cbdemt

Forum Lieutenant
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B for a few more months, then I.... then a year till P, then.... A DRINK :p !
 

MedicPrincess

Forum Deputy Chief
2,021
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Originally posted by cbdemt@Jul 7 2005, 01:02 PM
B for a few more months, then I.... then a year till P, then.... A DRINK :p !
just 1 drink??
 

vtemti

Forum Captain
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Originally posted by 007medic@Jul 6 2005, 06:00 PM
you hope to god that you got it in the right hole
Now this is a very tempting quote for response, but I will be a good boy and refrain from making any comments.

I techs in Vermont cannot intubate. We use the combi tube. B's are still stuck with only oral and nasal.
 
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