Everyone is a paramedic.

VentMonkey

Family Guy
5,384
4,596
113
But will it finally remove ETI from the “basic paramedic” curriculum?...boom.

#MadSubthread#PotStirring
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
5,384
4,596
113
I’m not particularly against it.

It probably should.
All kidding aside, it does lend credibility to the irrelevance of the job title in my opinion.

The layperson will still not care about anything but the type of customer service they’re provided, regardless of the “paramedic” who provides it.

Nothing new here.
 

EpiEMS

Forum Deputy Chief
3,469
953
113
The layperson will still not care about anything but the type of customer service they’re provided, regardless of the “paramedic” who provides it.
That's true, but I'm curious what the impact would be on municipalities & their willingness to pay for levels of care if they can just say "paramedic-level" care.
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
5,384
4,596
113
That's true, but I'm curious what the impact would be on municipalities & their willingness to pay for levels of care if they can just say "paramedic-level" care.
I’d imagine billing would still be largely based on the services rendered. I can’t see how a loose-term title changes that.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
5,484
1,570
113
to be perfectly serious, I would be ok with the term "medic" being used to describe any prehospital provider, from the questionably trained volunteer street medics that popped up during last years riots, to the critical care flight paramedic who can just look at a patient and get their heart starting again. an EMT would still be an EMT, a paramedic would still be a paramedic, and an ambulance driver would still be an ambulance driver, but they could all be called medic by the general public.

it wouldn't be e certification, but an umbrella term (like every suppression person on a FD is a firefighter, everyone in law enforcement is a cop, etc) that we could all fall under.
 

StCEMT

Forum Deputy Chief
2,844
1,551
113
But will it finally remove ETI from the “basic paramedic” curriculum?...boom.

#MadSubthread#PotStirring
I'll bite. With just how common VL is becoming, I'd still argue against it. At least at and between the 2 places I work, I don't know of anyone not using it. Both places I work had significant improvement in success rates using VL. High enough to have a valid argument for keeping it

I could maybe go with not having DL as the first line option or even at all should a department go that route. I do think technology has improved enough that we don't have to reduce it down to a all or nothing scenario though.
 

FlorianFred

Forum Ride Along
9
4
3
I don't have any real standing to weigh-in on this -- so of course I will anyway. I'm an EMR-trained person who also fights the occasional structure fire and does some MVA work (i.e., extrication and/or directing traffic). I personally like the term "medic" as an umbrella term, although I wouldn't call myself that unless the whole pre-hospital crowd said it was appropriate -- I work close enough with EMT's, Paramedics and RN's (Air Med) to know that my training and experience levels don't really warrant any kind of title, nor is it even really comparable to the professionals. The fire service is all volunteer in my county, but the medical services are contracted with a professional provider, so I'm an unpaid aspiring-professional.

That said, I'm usually (80% of the time) first on scene (rural area and only one ambulance to cover 450 square miles), and I run in with my medical bag, identify myself as a member of the fire department, and then provide the best care I can within my limited scope. I also make sure they know the ambulance is on the way, and I try my best to prepare for their arrival (i.e., some medical history, a quick SAMPLE, vitals, license and medical cards along with collection of meds) -- worst case it keeps the patient and family busy while we're waiting for the ambulance, and best case is it gives the crew a little bit of help. Most people around here don't really care who/what I am, I'm just "there", which means they or their loved one has someone else they can lean on. But I have had the occasional person ask "what are you, a Paramedic?" To which I answer, "no, I am a medical first responder, but the EMTs and Paramedics will be arriving soon in the ambulance....does he (or she) have any allergies?".

I guess I really don't need to be called a "medic", although I'd be honored to be thought of as one. To that end, I am planning on going for EMT training and will ultimately try to be NREMT certified -- perhaps still not a "medic", but closer than an EMR. I'll probably always be a volunteer-amateur, but I would like to raise my skill set up to be as helpful as I can to the community.
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
5,384
4,596
113
I'll bite. With just how common VL is becoming, I'd still argue against it. At least at and between the 2 places I work, I don't know of anyone not using it. Both places I work had significant improvement in success rates using VL. High enough to have a valid argument for keeping it

I could maybe go with not having DL as the first line option or even at all should a department go that route. I do think technology has improved enough that we don't have to reduce it down to a all or nothing scenario though.
I don’t disagree. But truthfully it being up to the agency’s medical director would require (rightfully so) extra training.

Usually these systems see the value in proper education. No problems here.

Nationally speaking why keep skimming over it? If you really “have to” intubate, take the time to seek that extra education.

To circle back, everyone can still be a “medic” with different skill sets respectively.
 

CCCSD

Forum Asst. Chief
965
565
93
I don’t disagree. But truthfully it being up to the agency’s medical director would require (rightfully so) extra training.

Usually these systems see the value in proper education. No problems here.

Nationally speaking why keep skimming over it? If you really “have to” intubate, take the time to seek that extra education.

To circle back, everyone can still be a “medic” with different skill sets respectively.
Circle back...so like...EMT Basic, AEMT, and Paramedic..??? 🤣🤣
 

EpiEMS

Forum Deputy Chief
3,469
953
113
Circle back...so like...EMT Basic, AEMT, and Paramedic..??? 🤣🤣
Ultimately, I think that's the end state.

Just put Paramedic in front of it (not literally, but not so far off), e.g.: Paramedic, Advanced Paramedic, Critical Care Paramedic, like in Canada
 

StCEMT

Forum Deputy Chief
2,844
1,551
113
I don’t disagree. But truthfully it being up to the agency’s medical director would require (rightfully so) extra training.

Usually these systems see the value in proper education. No problems here.

Nationally speaking why keep skimming over it? If you really “have to” intubate, take the time to seek that extra education.

To circle back, everyone can still be a “medic” with different skill sets respectively.
To some degree. Maybe it's just because I grew up with the generation that was into video games and VL feels almost like a game, but it wasn't hard at all to pick up. I think options like the King Vision, Air Traq, etc need a lot more hands on time than a McGrath which doesn't really change much at all compared to other things that are available.

Or just stop the skimming style of training and make it way more comprehensive from day 1. Looking back, I severely underutilized my OR and ICU time until I did my CCP program. I didn't know what I didn't know at first, the next go around I was at least more aware of I didn't know and what questions to ask.
 

VentMonkey

Family Guy
5,384
4,596
113
Or just stop the skimming style of training and make it way more comprehensive from day 1. Looking back, I severely underutilized my OR and ICU time until I did my CCP program. I didn't know what I didn't know at first, the next go around I was at least more aware of I didn't know and what questions to ask.
I think you’ve further illustrated my point.


Just put Paramedic in front of it (not literally, but not so far off), e.g.: Paramedic, Advanced Paramedic, Critical Care Paramedic, like in Canada
Agreed. As it stands now it serves mostly as a job title on any of my applications, and a means to support my family. What else matters?...
 
Last edited:

StCEMT

Forum Deputy Chief
2,844
1,551
113
I think you’ve further illustrated my point.
Yes, but I think a new approach to how things are taught can help that. When we look at these things as a skills check list, people aren't usually going to look beyond that.

Have proper education goals in place for these rotations that go beyond x tubes and med pushes. Even though I didn't fully utilize them, I followed people who did teach me some good nuggets of information that brought value to what I was doing. That and I also think those rotations should have more time than they are given. I would love a week in both an OR and ICU.
 

Top