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Equivalence salts

Discussion in 'Advanced Medical Discussions' started by Thomas239, Jul 13, 2018.

  1. Thomas239

    Thomas239 Forum Ride Along

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    Hello, do you know the equivalence of the differents salts of this molecule :

    10 mg Tranylcypromine sulfate Molecular Weight : 364.46 g/mol
    10 mg Tranylcypromine hydrochloride Molecular weight :169.65 g/mol

    10 mg Tranylcypromine hydrochloride will have 2.14 times more tranylcypromine than 10 mg Tranylcypromine sulfate.
    Is it correct?

    Thanks for your help
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018
  2. Remi

    Remi Forum Deputy Chief Premium Member

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    wut?
     
  3. Thomas239

    Thomas239 Forum Ride Along

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  4. VFlutter

    VFlutter Flight Nurse

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    [​IMG]
     
    PotatoMedic likes this.
  5. DrParasite

    DrParasite The fire extinguisher is not just for show

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    So my chemistry is a little rusty...and organic chem is even rustier... But assuming you have two molecules, both are composed of Tranylcypromine and a second molecule, and you are comparing their concentrations (in grams per mol), than you would be correct, provided the second half of the molecule (sulfate vs hydrocloride) are equal in weight, but I'm pretty sure that isn't the case.

    Since they have the same 10mg dose, but different concentrations, if you assume the second half do not factor into your equation, than yes, you would have 2.14 times as much Tranylcypromine in Tranylcypromine hydrochloride than in Tranylcypromine sulfate, because the lower the g/mol, the more chemical you have per gram.

    Don't forget, Tranylcypromine itself has a molar mass of 133.19 g/mol, so if you confirm that the hydrocholide and sulfate's molar masses are equal to the (weight of the new molecule) - 133.19, you might find out that they are equal in amount of Tranylcypromine, or different ratios altogether.

    But like I said, my chemistry is a bit rusty.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018 at 8:42 AM
  6. Peak

    Peak ED/Prehospital Registered Nurse

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    This really depends on the context in which you are addressing this.

    If you are talking about a chemistry class in which you have 10 mg of each drug on a scale then you would have a different amounts of tranylcypromine. No only do the various salts to which drugs are binded during production change total weight, but often pills are made with other active and inactive ingredients to make their size appropriately large, stay together, control how long they dissolve over, et cetera.

    If you are talking about having two bottles of parnate that are labeled as 10mg pills, one of which has tranylcypromine sulfate and one that is tranylcypromine hydrocholoride, then they should have an equivalent amount of active ingredients.
     
    Gurby likes this.
  7. Gurby

    Gurby Forum Asst. Chief

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    For the purposes of your chemistry class homework assignment, yes, you are correct.
     

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