EMT-Basic to RN.

brassguy

Forum Crew Member
39
0
0
Hey everyone, I have not been here for quite a while. Hope everbody is well! I was kind of wondering if anyone has gone from EMT-B to RN (ADN or BSN)????? I am going back to school in the fall for pre-req's and gen eds for the local community college nursing program. I was wondering what the transition was from EMT to RN was if anyone has done this???

Stay safe! :p

Eric
 

VentMedic

Forum Chief
5,923
1
0
There is not a "transition" from EMT to RN. You will basically be starting from scratch. EMT is a 110 hour slightly advanced first aid course with no prequisites. RN is a professional career degree program that requires much more effort and commitment. The initial focus will also be on education and not "skills". Skills will come later. RN offers a solid foundation for you to build your desired focus on later. It is not designed as the EMT or Paramedic course which forcuses on a few job ready skills and leaves out the foundation part.

The only difference between you and other entry level nursing students is that you may have been inside of nursing homes and hospitals. You may also have done a few basic level assessments, taken BPs and done CPR. As you are in nursing school you will learn much more about BPs and assessments then what you have been taught so far. You will be taught the "whys" of what you do and why it done that way.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Jeremy89

Forum Captain
290
0
16
You can go from EMT>Medic>LPN>RN from what I have heard. A buddy of mine is in the medic stage of this transition.
 

JPINFV

Gadfly
12,681
196
63
You can go from EMT>Medic>LPN>RN from what I have heard. A buddy of mine is in the medic stage of this transition.

You can also go from HS diploma->RN. Why go though the extra 3 stages if you know what your end goal is?
 

Jeremy89

Forum Captain
290
0
16
You can also go from HS diploma->RN. Why go though the extra 3 stages if you know what your end goal is?
Because waiting time for nursing programs are insane around here. If you take the medic route, its about the same time and you can go straight into the program without a wait...
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
3,880
17
38
There is nothing wrong with getting your EMT-B while waiting to get into a nursing program. It is done all the time. Many nurses were or are still are EMT-Bs from the time that they did this. They enjoyed it and would recommend it. However doing so does not shorten the nursing program obviously.

You may in addition become a CNA as well as an EMT-B and work part time as an ER tech. They like nursing students and its a good resume builder for when you finish the nursing program.
 

VentMedic

Forum Chief
5,923
1
0
You may in addition become a CNA as well as an EMT-B and work part time as an ER tech. They like nursing students and its a good resume builder for when you finish the nursing program.

Usually after completion of one semester of nursing clinicals you can challenge the CNA. Many hospitals may even give you preference to their CNA training program and a job if you are enrolled in an RN program. Tuition reimbursement is pretty good also. Hospitals are not support LVN programs that much anymore. LVNs are now in the nursing homes.

I would not depend too much on the EMT-B cert when applying for a hospital position. It may help but the "I wanna be an RN" will open doors. Some of the skills you learned in EMT-B will not be wasted. However, when working in the hospital environment with patients who have various pieces of equipment, braces, rods and lines attached to their bodies, you'll find you may be learning about moving a patient in a very different way. Your CPR knowledge will be immportant but you may have a different role as an advanced provider/RN in a hospital.

If you apply for an RN program now while you are doing your prequisites, chances are there will be an opening when you complete them. If you are enrolled in a Paramedic program and there is an opening, you may get passed up for that position in the RN program. If you do not plan on working as a Paramedic, there are many options to check out in nursing in the ED and Trauma. These positions in major trauma centers require extensive addition training. Again, a 2 yr or 4 yr nursing degree is just a solid foundation from which you can build countless opportunities.

It also depends on why you are choosing the nursing profession. If it is just for the credential or the money, you may have a difficult time gaining credibility in some nursing programs or jobs. Many Paramedics have gone into nursing only to be greatly surprised by the vast differences in the two professions. They end up being nurses by credential only and not experience.
 

LucidResq

Forum Deputy Chief
2,031
3
0
Hello! I am not an RN, but I am currently an EMT-B student and working on pre-reqs for a BSN program. I think Vent really hit the nail on the head. EMT courses focus on skills, but nursing programs (especially BSN) are much more academic. You may be able to take a BP with ease while the other students struggle with the cuff, but can you write an APA paper in perfect format? Are you good at statistics?

The way I see it, the advantage of being an EMT-B prior to getting into nursing is having a slight headstart on things like building patient rapport and taking vitals, and also that you're more likely to know that you're in the right field. If you work as an EMT, you'll already have experienced some of the ins-and-outs of working in health care, like the politics, paperwork, a-hole patients, a-hole coworkers, crazy families, vomit, poop, etc etc.

Just as many people have misconceptions as to what EMS is all about, many nursing students have misconceptions about the career. Some of the misconceptions are common among the two professions. If you've already had some of these misconceptions shattered by working as an EMT, then you don't have to go through that process when starting off as nurse and you're more likely to get into nursing for the right reasons.

Anyways, good luck!
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
3,880
17
38
I would not depend too much on the EMT-B cert when applying for a hospital position. It may help but the "I wanna be an RN" will open doors. Some of the skills you learned in EMT-B will not be wasted. However, when working in the hospital environment with patients who have various pieces of equipment, braces, rods and lines attached to their bodies, you'll find you may be learning about moving a patient in a very different way. Your CPR knowledge will be immportant but you may have a different role as an advanced provider/RN in a hospital.

Having worked as an EMT-B is a good resume builder because it shows you can be trusted with patients. Thats it. We don't do much that translates into the hospital setting.
 

emtbuff

Forum Captain
490
0
0
I have to agree with vent. There is a difference between nursing and EMS. I've heard it described as being nursing "sterile environment" EMS "non sterile environment". because nurses workin in mostly controled environments and ems doesn't. I started off in EMS to nursing but i did my genereals while waiting for a spot to open in the nursing program which did in 2 years. Depending on your area departments around you as a nurse you can sometimes work as an EMT with there department per their protocols.
 

KEVD18

Forum Deputy Chief
2,165
7
0
there are programs that will give you a by on certain courses if your a medic(no love for basics). you can also do all of your lectures online/by mail.

the down side is; just as there are crappy services and good services, crappy emt/medic schools and good ones, crappy trucks and good ones; you wont get the same respect as someone who went to a real nursing school.

both of my parents are rn/bsn's. my mother was also an emt for a period of time. with the exception of small things(vitals, pt interviews etc), there not similar. your not starting ahead of the game really.
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
3,880
17
38
I have to agree with vent. There is a difference between nursing and EMS. .

I don't think anyone is disagreeing that nursing and EMS are different.
 

Ridryder911

EMS Guru
5,922
38
48
How not to get into nursing school... tel them your a medic. Seriously, unless it is a transitional Paramedic to nursing, I would forgo the telling them I am an EMT. Most nursing instructors have no concept nor impressed with most of EMS representations. I would recommend the nurse tech over EMT while attempting to get into a nursing program. I know, I teach nursing part time...and have at many different institutions and areas, it is not uncommon thought about EMT's. Really, look around, sometimes who blames them?

R/r 911
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
3,880
17
38
you can find less than impressive representations of any and all professions including RNs, MDs/DOs and of course EMS.

I have a friend in BSN program. She works as an EMT-B until she finishes school this May. Her teachers did not like EMS at all. She would impress them with certain acronyms she used to memorize material in certain classes. They were common EMS acronyms. Teachers became more impressed with her and EMS
 

upstateemt

Forum Crew Member
75
0
0
I have been a critical care RN for over 20 years and an EMT for only 5. I remember when I started my EMT training everyone said , Oh this will be easy for you. I worked just as hard as my "non-medical" classmates. It's just a different world.

Much in my nursing background has helped me greatly in my EMT role and my nursing education did help when I went on to intermediate. They are both interesting challenging fields.

Interestingly, I ran into ALOT of prejudice from EMT's toward nurses. I learned very quickly when doing my Intermediate ride time NOT to tell anyone I was an RN.
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
3,880
17
38
Interestingly, I ran into ALOT of prejudice from EMT's toward nurses. I learned very quickly when doing my Intermediate ride time NOT to tell anyone I was an RN.

I believe it. And I think thats stupid. Shouldn't have to hide being an RN.
 

Epi-do

I see dead people
1,947
8
38
emt 92591, just curious, but why not take the money you are going to invest in EMT-B, medic and LPN school (not to mention all the hours you are going to put in as well) and just apply it all to going for your BSN?

I am not trying to be mean or anything, but it just seems to me that if you want to be a nurse that there are better paths to take to get there.

It just seems like there are so many people that get into EMS because they want to do some other job "in the end". How many times do you hear someone say they are going to be a cop and then go to law school, or that they are going to groom dogs before going to beauty school? Maybe people will start out working as a Maytag repair guy on their way to becoming a brain surgeon? People typically decide to work as a cop, attorney, dog groomer, or beautician because that is the job they want to do, not because they want to do something else. And as for the person that decides to be a repair guy to ultimately be a surgeon, there really isn't much about the first job that will help you out in the second job. Yes, in both jobs you are "fixing" something/someone, but that is pretty much where the similarity ends. Sort of like EMS and nursing are both medical professions, but are two completely different worlds.

I guess I just wish that people would quit looking at EMS as "something to do while I become something else" and realize it is a profession that needs dedicated people who want to be here for the long haul. (Ok, off my soapbox now.)
 

rmellish

Forum Captain
440
0
0
I would understand EMT-P to RN. Theres a number of programs out there designed just for that.

LPN would be a definite step backwards from EMT-P.
 

Top