Do you tell a prospective employer the details about your personal health?

DragonClaw

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Long story short, I have an autoimmune disease. It's controlled under medication and I am not asking for any reasonable accommodations or any exceptions. I'm not trying to hide it, either. But is this something I need to disclose?

I don't want to have to put that down, but I'm not trying to be all secretive and such. I've only had one moderate issue with it since I was diagnosed with it like 7 years ago and that was when I didn't have insurance and couldn't afford the meds. Got back on the meds and all is good.

Thoughts?
 

DesertMedic66

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No it’s not something that you need to tell anyone.
 

DrParasite

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simple answer, no.
 

mgr22

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Disclose to whom? An employer? Did they ask?

In general, when applying for employment, I wouldn't answer questions not asked.
 

DragonClaw

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Disclose to whom? An employer? Did they ask?

In general, when applying for employment, I wouldn't answer questions not asked.
Yeah an employer.

I mean, if I was an epileptic (I'm not, this doesn't cause anything to suddenly, drastically affect me), wouldn't that be important for them to know?

I dunno. I could see both ways?

And I guess based off the ADA, they can't ask that?
 

mgr22

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Yeah an employer.

I mean, if I was an epileptic (I'm not, this doesn't cause anything to suddenly, drastically affect me), wouldn't that be important for them to know?

I dunno. I could see both ways?

And I guess based off the ADA, they can't ask that?
I'm not saying it wouldn't be important for your employer to know you're an epileptic (which I understand you're not); I'm just advising you not to offer information that's not required. Doing so could put you at an unfair disadvantage.

Suppose I volunteered to an employer that I'm an asthmatic (which I'm not), despite my asthma being well-controlled by medication. What do I have to gain by that? What if my employer decided subjectively that I'm not worth the risk? I might lose an opportunity to work without knowing why I was rejected.

Employers have opportunities to ask questions before they hire. Your job is to answer legal questions honestly -- not to audit their effectiveness.
 

DragonClaw

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I'm not saying it wouldn't be important for your employer to know you're an epileptic (which I understand you're not); I'm just advising you not to offer information that's not required. Doing so could put you at an unfair disadvantage.

Suppose I volunteered to an employer that I'm an asthmatic (which I'm not), despite my asthma being well-controlled by medication. What do I have to gain by that? What if my employer decided subjectively that I'm not worth the risk? I might lose an opportunity to work without knowing why I was rejected.

Employers have opportunities to ask questions before they hire. Your job is to answer legal questions honestly -- not to audit their effectiveness.
Hmm, okay. I just didn't want to have that come back on me "You DIDN'T tell us XYZ?! :0 "

That's reassuring.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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Hmm, okay. I just didn't want to have that come back on me "You DIDN'T tell us XYZ?! :0 "

That's reassuring.
So what if they do? Does it affect your job performance? Does it have any bearing on your job?

I have high cholesterol (which I really do), but it's controlled by medication. If someone asked me about it, I wouldn't deny it; but volunteering the information? It doesn't benefit me at all, it doesn't affect my ability to do the job, so it's not really my employers concern. Plus, I'd want to get the job offer and start working, and should it affect my job, then let someone know (after they already liked me and offered me the job), not where subconscious biases could result in them removing me from consideration for a position.

Now if they were sending me to a pre-employment physical, that's a different story. But on an application or during an interview? nope.
 

mgr22

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Hmm, okay. I just didn't want to have that come back on me "You DIDN'T tell us XYZ?! :0 "
I understand your concern, but I'd recommend you seek employment where you sense more of a mutually respectful environment than a punitive one. Part of that is feeling confident enough to respond to your hypothetical accuser with, "You didn't ask."

I know that sounds severe. I'm not suggesting you create adversarial relationships with your bosses. I'm just saying you should concentrate on doing the right things and worry less about what bosses with arthritic personalities might try doing to you. The possibilities are endless. If you're mistreated, stick up for yourself and see what happens next.
 

DragonClaw

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So what if they do? Does it affect your job performance? Does it have any bearing on your job?

I have high cholesterol (which I really do), but it's controlled by medication. If someone asked me about it, I wouldn't deny it; but volunteering the information? It doesn't benefit me at all, it doesn't affect my ability to do the job, so it's not really my employers concern. Plus, I'd want to get the job offer and start working, and should it affect my job, then let someone know (after they already liked me and offered me the job), not where subconscious biases could result in them removing me from consideration for a position.

Now if they were sending me to a pre-employment physical, that's a different story. But on an application or during an interview? nope.
I dunno. I mean, I'm pretty honest and open. I'm a big fan of the truth and having all the facts laid out. But I've learned this isn't always the best way. And the truth doesn't always equal right or justice etc. Etc..

And sometimes people just don't need to know. I'm learning that steadily. That just because it's true, doesn't mean you need to advertise it.

Much to my prior detriment and chagrin.

I mean, this is kind of my first professional rodeo. Someone aught to know better than me about things like this and I'll defer to experience.
 

RocketMedic

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Giving a company unsolicited information is a bad idea. Revealing personal history to them is something that should only be done if an offer has been extended and a reasonable need for communication of that condition exists.
 

jgmedic

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Depends on the job, in the fire service, and possibly for some civil service positions, there may be a medical exam, with a questionnaire. Lying on these can have you lose the position or get fired if revealed later on.
 

DragonClaw

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Depends on the job, in the fire service, and possibly for some civil service positions, there may be a medical exam, with a questionnaire. Lying on these can have you lose the position or get fired if revealed later on.
I would not lie by any means. Lying to get the job means one of you doesn't deserve the other.
 
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