Design student looking for input from professionals!

Zirro

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Hello! I'm an industrial design student currently focusing on medical design. I am working on redesigning and AED machine and coming up with a CPR assist device. I would really like to learn about what kind of experiences you've had performing CPR and using AED. It would really help me out a lot. I'm trying to develop and push my project further and make it as close to being able to use it in reality as much as possible!

Here are some questions that I would like you to address.

- What are the main things that you should know to perform CPR?
- Could you think of any problems that you have experienced or what people generally do wrong when performing CPR?
- Is there any visual queue that helps you perform CPR? (Is there anything that would help you work better visually?)
- How bad would it be if a person who had to perform CPR doesn't know where to put the compression? Would it break the ribs and injure other organs?
- Do you think having a sign on a chest (where to put pressure) would help people without training perform CPR?

Thank you for reading through all the questions! I hope it's not too much trouble.

Best of luck :)
 

MonkeyArrow

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You are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist.

1. Push hard and push fast in the middle of someones chest
2. People don't go hard enough or fast enough or allow full chest recoil between each compressions
3. Devices like what you are describing already exist. AEDs have integrated metronomes now to pace out compression rates.
4. I've never seen a person do CPR on the wrong anatomic location; if people don't know where to perform CHEST compressions, they won't do it. It is really a pretty intuitive concept. You push on someone's heart. But theoretically, you would injure other organs depending on where you compressed. However, it probably would't matter since the patient would be dead anyways. With proper CPR, you often break ribs anyways.
5. Who would put the sign on the chest? If someone who is there knows where to put the sign, then that person would also know the correct location to do CPR and would just do the chest compressions.
 
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Zirro

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Thank you for your answers MonkeyArrow!

I would try to work on something that could aid people with putting pressure on the chest. I have done some research and see that it could get very tiring especially when you have to perform a chest compression for up to 10 minutes to wait for EMT to arrive. You could lose strength and that would result in not having enough force to push down hard and fast on the chest. That is why I thought it would be interesting to target this problem.
As for the sign and visual queue, I think it would be useful if anyone could just place a pad that would determine the correct location on the chest to perform chest compression without having to worry and second guessing what they are doing. Or could be anything that encourage bystander visually to help save someone's life.
 
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luke_31

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Rotating out every two minutes on CPR is what is recommended. 10mins alone with performing CPR will result in ineffective CPR after the first two minutes from what studies show.
 
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Zirro

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Thank you luke_31!

What would we have to do after performing CPR for two minutes while waiting for EMT?

Do you think that having something to help create more pressure on the chest would help at all?
 
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Zirro

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At least as a tool to help people without professional training to perform CPR
 

RocketMedic

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Impossible "problem" to solve. absent a few zealots, no civilian is going to go buying a CPR information kit and publicly placed aeds have all of that information anyway
 

NPO

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My recommendation for you is to got take a CPR class. Most of your questions, it seems, would be answered there.

Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
 

NomadicMedic

EMS Edumacator
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CPR, as it is now, it's about as easy as it can get.

No special tools needed. Minimal training. Hands in the center of the chest and pump along with "stayin' alive".

You're trying to design a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.

If you want a challenge, work on a way to get bystanders minimally trained and engaged.
 

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