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CPR endurance exercises?

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by redundantbassist, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. redundantbassist

    redundantbassist Nefarious Dude

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    Good afternoon all,
    I am trying to increase how long I can perform chest compressions without getting tired. (thus compromising depth and overall quality) I'm a somewhat small guy, 5' 10", 150 lbs, and sometimes have difficulty maintaining quality compressions. What upper body exercises would you recommend to increase muscular strength and endurance?
     
  2. teedubbyaw

    teedubbyaw Forum Deputy Chief

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    Dumbbell rows, bench press, flys, etc. etc. Do full upper body workouts, don't focus on one thing.
     
  3. joshrunkle35

    joshrunkle35 Forum Captain

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    To clarify, you have trouble making it through 2 minutes or 5 cycles of CPR? Do you have people to relieve you when you get tired?
     
  4. redundantbassist

    redundantbassist Nefarious Dude

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    No, I can get through 2 minutes just fine. Usually we have FF or other EMTs on scene to relieve us when we get tired, but sometimes when it's just us I will have to to compressions for a long stretch of time while the medic is hooking the pads up, pushing drugs, intubating, etc. We trade places as soon as he's done setting up, but unfortunately for me he likes to take his time. :rolleyes:
     
  5. gotbeerz001

    gotbeerz001 Forum Deputy Chief

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    Lots of peanut butter. We gotta get you closer to 180 lbs!!!

    Get a little bit of weight on you and really just let gravity do the rest.
     
  6. redundantbassist

    redundantbassist Nefarious Dude

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    When I hit 40 I guess that won't be an issue anymore:)
     
  7. NomadicMedic

    NomadicMedic EMS Edumacator

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    Doesn't matter how strong you are, or how tired you are… The studies show your CPR rapidly becomes less effective after two minutes. Tell the paramedic to hurry up, and swap out.

    For goodness sake's, he should be able to drill an IO, push an Epi and get the pads on all in two minutes. :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2014
  8. Underoath87

    Underoath87 Forum Asst. Chief

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    Depends on where you're performing CPR. If the patient is on the ground, then it is all gravity and lower back endurance (since your weight presses down and your erector spinae lift your upper body after each compression).
    If the patient is up high (like if you're riding the stretcher or performing CPR in a raised bed), then tricep, chest, and lat strength and endurance will be most important. Either way, just bulking up and strengthening your core should help.
     
  9. Grimes

    Grimes Forum Asst. Chief

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    Coming from someone only slightly larger at 5'11" 160, let me remind you that CPR is very much so a full body workout. Consider it to be not pushing on the chest, but falling with some force on the chest. Elbows locked, back straight, bend at the hips. If you had to pick something I would honestly say work your core and back, emphasizing proper technique and a straight, contracted back.

    If you are doing CPR in an awkward position, then fix the position. In a corner? Do an emergency move and get into an open space. On a bed? Good god, don't do CPR on a bed, get them on the floor or on a back board. Bed too high? Get them on your stretcher or the floor. In an ED where beds only go so low? Get a stool. In my department we have a step stool that we keep under the unit clerk's desk. When a code comes in, the step stool is often the first item in the room. I grab it before I grab the EKG machine.

    Someone on this forum said it before, but I'll repeat it. A few seconds of no compressions followed by continuous adequate compressions is worth it when the only alternative is inadequate compressions.

    Edit: If anyone ever gives you lip for accommodating yourself with a stool or by asking to reposition to allow for quality compressions, remind them that advocating for your patient is one of the most important things in medicine. If you are allowing inadequate compressions, then you are doing the patient a disservice. Accommodate yourself or swap out; no shame in either.
     
  10. firecoins

    firecoins IFT Puppet

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    push ups, lots of push up.
     
    TheScientist likes this.
  11. DesertMedic66

    DesertMedic66 Forum Troll

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    I don’t know. Let me ask my EMT or firefighter...
     
    NomadicMedic and VFlutter like this.
  12. VFlutter

    VFlutter Flight Nurse

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    Indoor rower is a great workout
     
  13. MSDeltaFlt

    MSDeltaFlt Forum Deputy Chief

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    Chest compressions is all core and never ever ever arms. You lock your elbows. The key to quality chest compressions is your cadence. Some sing certain songs in their heads that a tempo somewhere 100bpm. The song you sing in your head is irrelevant. The key is the tempo. A good exercise is one that will mimic those precise repetitive muscle movements.

    Me? I have a hospital blanket that I roll up. I will get on the floor on my knees and straddle one end and start doing chest compressions on the other end. In my ears I have disco or techno music cranked. Or even fast paced rock. It really doesn't matter. And I start pumping until the song ends or I do. You're basically doing cardio. It's not how strong you are.

    It's how long you're strong.

    So break out the glow sticks and get the party started. "Nts... nts... nts... nts..."
     
    Eir likes this.
  14. TheScientist

    TheScientist Forum Probie

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    Not an expert, but push-ups seem like they would help, especially as you don't need to go to the gym specifically to do it
     
  15. NPO

    NPO Forum Deputy Chief

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    Why would you need to build enfurancd for CPR?

    The button on the Lucas requires 1, MAYBE 2 pounds of pressure to start.
     
    Gurby likes this.
  16. DesertMedic66

    DesertMedic66 Forum Troll

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    The only buttons my Lucas has are on his bunker gear
     
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