Basic->Medic or Basic->AEMT->Medic

Jemig

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Hey Guys,
I am a basic right now with an ultimate goal to become a medic. I am in no rush, but would like to get there in the next couple years. I am struggling to figure out what the best way to go about this. My question is, is it better to get a specialist license right now and work in ALS for a while then go get my medic, or just get experience with my basic and then go straight to medic? (I am in Michigan by the way, I know things differ state to state)
 

STXmedic

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If you want to be a medic, go get your medic. Don't waste time doing steps. There's no benefit in my opinion.*

*The opinions on this do vary widely.
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
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Unless the Paramedic Program requires you get the "intermediate" certificate/license first, there's usually no reason to do so. They can take you from EMT to Paramedic directly. Truth be told, done right, they could do a zero to hero program and essentially take someone directly to Paramedic without too much trouble.
 

BASICallyEMT

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Most medic programs in my area require a minimum amount of hours on a ambulance (preferably a ALS unit). This allows you to gain knowledge on what medics actually do. IMO, there are benefits of working 911 prior to enrolling in a medic program. There is always something new to learn, you just have to put the effort in.
 

OnceAnEMT

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The "path" varies by program. Some programs will have a 1st "semester" that essentially gets you to the AEMT level and provides the option to test for AEMT, and then a 2nd "semester" that is strictly Paramedic level material. Some programs require AEMT before starting.
 

Christopher

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Hey Guys,
I am a basic right now with an ultimate goal to become a medic. I am in no rush, but would like to get there in the next couple years. I am struggling to figure out what the best way to go about this. My question is, is it better to get a specialist license right now and work in ALS for a while then go get my medic, or just get experience with my basic and then go straight to medic? (I am in Michigan by the way, I know things differ state to state)

Go straight to medic, don't waste your time learning things the wrong way (experience != education; or at least it is inefficient).

Most medic programs in my area require a minimum amount of hours on a ambulance (preferably a ALS unit). This allows you to gain knowledge on what medics actually do. IMO, there are benefits of working 911 prior to enrolling in a medic program. There is always something new to learn, you just have to put the effort in.

Most programs that require you to spend time in the field do so because they are inferior programs that cannot properly educate providers.
 

TransportJockey

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Unless the Paramedic Program requires you get the "intermediate" certificate/license first, there's usually no reason to do so. They can take you from EMT to Paramedic directly. Truth be told, done right, they could do a zero to hero program and essentially take someone directly to Paramedic without too much trouble.
This. One of the best medics I worked with at my old job with the Evil Empire was a zero to hero BS degree medic from the local EMS Academy (attached to the school of medicine, in the EM dept). He could run circles around medics with a ton of 'experience' as a basic before they got their medic.
Experience is what you make of it. But education is an equalizer that can level the playing field very well, especially in a good program.
 

46Young

Level 25 EMS Wizard
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As an AEMT, you're learning skills thst a paramedic can do, but with only a fraction of the dequisite education. I recommend getting the education while you learn these skills, by going straight to medic.
 

DrParasite

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Work as an EMT for 2-3 years, on a 911 ambulance, then get your medic.

There are two problems with Zero to Hero programs: 1) you have no EMS work experience, so you are trying to get a paramedic job and competing against people are are experienced and have seen more than you saw just in the classroom and 2) medic school and ride time is great, but I've seen many medics whose assessment skills and people skills suck. Plus you want to know what you are getting yourself into.

Are there people who are great Zero to Hero medics? sure, but I would say they are the exception rather than the rule.

skip the AEMT, it won't give you more money and most EMS systems will still pair you up with a medic, regardless of if you are an EMT or AEMT.
 

teedubbyaw

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I wouldn't waste the money. I get to start IV's and do advanced airways, but other than that, I function as a basic 99% of the time. It was more for a practice of NREMT testing and that I have the summer off to work.

I disagree with the above poster to an extent. A good medic program, plus over 400 hours of clinical experience, + academy, + field training is more than adequate for a lot of people.
 

Handsome Robb

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Look at agencies around you that you'd want to work at while you work on medic school. We don't hire EMT-Bs full time because the County doesn't allow them on the ambulance so I went and got my EMT-I so I could work in the field during medic school. Definitely didn't need EMT-I to do well in medic school though.

I worked for about a year as an I and was bored to tears by 7 months.
 

BASICallyEMT

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Go straight to medic, don't waste your time learning things the wrong way (experience != education; or at least it is inefficient).



Most programs that require you to spend time in the field do so because they are inferior programs that cannot properly educate providers.

False, it's for the ones coming straight out of a EMT program who have no field experience. EMT courses are inefficient as it is... It saves time teaching medic students the basics of the job. And why spend all the time and effort going to medic school just to realize it isn't for you, when you could have figured that out as a basic. Some people cannot perform under pressure and the only way to know is to be in the field.
 

STXmedic

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False, it's for the ones coming straight out of a EMT program who have no field experience. EMT courses are inefficient as it is... It saves time teaching medic students the basics of the job. And why spend all the time and effort going to medic school just to realize it isn't for you, when you could have figured that out as a basic. Some people cannot perform under pressure and the only way to know is to be in the field.

I'm having a hard time deciphering what you are trying to get across. The only reason I know what side of this argument you are on (at least I think I know) is because you're using the "find out if its for you" argument. The rest of your post seems quite nonsensical to me.
 

Christopher

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False, it's for the ones coming straight out of a EMT program who have no field experience. EMT courses are inefficient as it is... It saves time teaching medic students the basics of the job. And why spend all the time and effort going to medic school just to realize it isn't for you, when you could have figured that out as a basic. Some people cannot perform under pressure and the only way to know is to be in the field.

I'll put my bias out front: I don't believe there should even be an EMT course as a "starter" / "get your feet wet" / "get a taste of EMS" / "find out if this is right for you". The minimum education should be Paramedic, with at least an AS degree component. Scope of practice should be graded per additional education (such as BS/MS), with most "paramedics" practicing at roughly an AEMT level right out of school (+ECG interpretation).

If the EMT and paramedic programs in your area are that bad, perhaps they do need an "experience" based component. But it is hardly required, nor is it reasonable to require of students. If your programs aren't able to determine this of its students they're not doing their job.
 

TransportJockey

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I'll put my bias out front: I don't believe there should even be an EMT course as a "starter" / "get your feet wet" / "get a taste of EMS" / "find out if this is right for you". The minimum education should be Paramedic, with at least an AS degree component. Scope of practice should be graded per additional education (such as BS/MS), with most "paramedics" practicing at roughly an AEMT level right out of school (+ECG interpretation).

If the EMT and paramedic programs in your area are that bad, perhaps they do need an "experience" based component. But it is hardly required, nor is it reasonable to require of students. If your programs aren't able to determine this of its students they're not doing their job.
I fully agree with you, looking at britain or.Australia as examples of that. I wish we were like that
 

STXmedic

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I'll put my bias out front: I don't believe there should even be an EMT course as a "starter" / "get your feet wet" / "get a taste of EMS" / "find out if this is right for you". The minimum education should be Paramedic, with at least an AS degree component. Scope of practice should be graded per additional education (such as BS/MS), with most "paramedics" practicing at roughly an AEMT level right out of school (+ECG interpretation).

If the EMT and paramedic programs in your area are that bad, perhaps they do need an "experience" based component. But it is hardly required, nor is it reasonable to require of students. If your programs aren't able to determine this of its students they're not doing their job.

This.
 

Handsome Robb

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I'm not gonna quote it...but what they said.

California seems to be the only place that has medic schools who consistently require experience.

I call BS on not knowing if it's for you. Clinical and Internship components are mandatory...pretty easy to figure it out during school.
 

BASICallyEMT

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I'm not gonna quote it...but what they said.

California seems to be the only place that has medic schools who consistently require experience.

I call BS on not knowing if it's for you. Clinical and Internship components are mandatory...pretty easy to figure it out during school.

Clinical experience varies by student. Not everyone is going to have the same amount of calls or the same type of calls (if you even get a call). As for experience, I agree maybe it is just good for my area. You have EMTs who put minimal effort into their programs and will forget what they learned fairly quickly. So students have to relearn BLS topics that take away time from the ALS portion. All I'm saying is how can it hurt getting some experience in a 911 system where you work alongside medics. I personally like asking medics questions and learning from them in hopes of easing my way through medic school.
 

STXmedic

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Assuming the medics that you work under are actually good, competent, knowledgeable medics that are willing to teach you, then there's nothing at all wrong. If the medics lack the aforementioned traits, then you may be having bad habits instilled that will be detrimental to you in school. You won't likely know what category your medic falls into, either (due simply to ignorance on your part). After all, they're the ones that went to medic school, so what they say and do must be correct.
 

BASICallyEMT

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Assuming the medics that you work under are actually good, competent, knowledgeable medics that are willing to teach you, then there's nothing at all wrong. If the medics lack the aforementioned traits, then you may be having bad habits instilled that will be detrimental to you in school. You won't likely know what category your medic falls into, either (due simply to ignorance on your part). After all, they're the ones that went to medic school, so what they say and do must be correct.

I would hope most could separate the good from the bad apples and keep an open mind. I can easily pick out medics to stray away from.
 
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