Adding suffix to your name

Pond Life

Forum Crew Member
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I was advised to insert my academic qualifications on official documents (letters and emails) and to place my professional designation on a separate line as part of an address if it's applicable to external professional communications.
Otherwise leave all that stuff off as it just looks like your boasting about achievements.

I do have a question though. What is the etiquette for 2 degrees at the same level - it 2 x MSc
 

COmedic17

Forum Asst. Chief
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There's someone at my work who adds "NREMT, EMT-IV, EKG, EMD" to all emails.
They are obviously pretty proud of the 2 day IV course and the 4 day general EKG course they took.

It has turned into kind of a joke, so if anyone responds, they will add every cert they have as kind of a jab... Like
"Sorry _____ I can't work for you Tuesday.

-Signed ______
EMP-P, ACLS, PALS, AMLS, PHTLS, ITLS"
 

OnceAnEMT

Forum Asst. Chief
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My Emergency Management resume is headed with name, address, contact, blah blah. My name has the NREMT suffix, as I do believe it is worthy. If I get my CEM I'll replace it with that. I use NREMT instead of EMT-B (Texas licenses EMT-B's) because of the national recognition, and it is arguably "higher". Sure you need a license to practice, but the NREMT is a pretty key step to that process, and it shows extended CE involvement versus just state requirements. And it makes me feel a little better about myself!

I'll never agree with anyone putting the ACLS, BTLS, etc. CE tags on anything unless you also put AHA CPR/AED for HCP, US Citizen, Travis County Property Owner, Travis County Voter, Republican, got an A in A&P, and Class C driver's license. Then I accept your funny.

AT's seemed to be starting to get into this when I got off that boat. Graston certs, KT certs, etc.
 

joshrunkle35

EMT-P/RN
583
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After passing NREMT you receive a letter stating you can add NREMT-P to the end of your name.

Any letters in the last few years should say "NRP", not "NREMT-P" for paramedics after the transition.

FWIW, I only sign post nominal letters related to EMS on one very specific log at the end of a shift if I am the crew leader/supervisor. That's it...and only because that log requires it to verify which medic was in charge of the shift.

I don't really believe that any training/schooling/degrees less than a master's level degree should be included otherwise.
 

ThadeusJ

Forum Lieutenant
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My Emergency Management resume is headed with name, address, contact, blah blah. My name has the NREMT suffix, as I do believe it is worthy. If I get my CEM I'll replace it with that. I use NREMT instead of EMT-B (Texas licenses EMT-B's) because of the national recognition, and it is arguably "higher". Sure you need a license to practice, but the NREMT is a pretty key step to that process, and it shows extended CE involvement versus just state requirements. And it makes me feel a little better about myself!

I'll never agree with anyone putting the ACLS, BTLS, etc. CE tags on anything unless you also put AHA CPR/AED for HCP, US Citizen, Travis County Property Owner, Travis County Voter, Republican, got an A in A&P, and Class C driver's license. Then I accept your funny.

AT's seemed to be starting to get into this when I got off that boat. Graston certs, KT certs, etc.


You forgot your Sam's Club card...
 

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
Community Leader
5,334
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To each their own.

I find it a bit ludicrous when I read an email signature that includes the alphabet soup.

Though there are a few exceptions, it seems that the more education one has, the less inclined they he or she is to include it in an email signature.
 

gotbeerz001

Forum Deputy Chief
1,312
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My Emergency Management resume is headed with name, address, contact, blah blah. My name has the NREMT suffix, as I do believe it is worthy. If I get my CEM I'll replace it with that. I use NREMT instead of EMT-B (Texas licenses EMT-B's) because of the national recognition, and it is arguably "higher". Sure you need a license to practice, but the NREMT is a pretty key step to that process, and it shows extended CE involvement versus just state requirements. And it makes me feel a little better myself!

In CA (a known substandard state), the NR is simply a step you have to pass in order to get your state card. Many people let it go after that unless they see a real possibility of leaving the state. Maintenance of NR is not required for recertification/license renewal.
 

BillThompson

Forum Probie
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I also put all my other single-semester accomplishments.

Rob
EMT-B, English 1A, Humanities 1, PE 5

Yes, because those are remotely similar. People should be proud of their accomplishments. If a person putting a few letters behind their name is really that much of a problem for you I think the issue may lie with you and not the letters.
 

Jim37F

Forum Deputy Chief
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I wonder what my NCOIC would say if I signed my emails as SGT Jim37F BCT, AIT, BAC, WLC, CLS, ARCOM, AAM, GCM.....

If you're writing an official business document sign it with your job title "Operations Manager" "Communications Supervisor" "Flight Paramedic, Shift XX Tail#" "Crew Chief Station 14, 1402 B Shift" if you really wanna get fancy. You've already proved your credentials to everyone by getting the job title, no need to put 50 million letters. Prove to everyone you know your stuff by actually DOING it, not throwing random jumbles of letters at them.

Anything outside writing official emails/documents at work or other job related stuff like academic research, i.e. the civilian world, I guarantee you people simply don't give a ****. They MAY know what an EMT is (I still get blank looks all the time when I tell people what I do when they ask, I have to explain to them I work on the ambulance for them to get it lol), I guarantee you they don't know, and don't particularly care what NREMT or PHTLS or whatever else is. Do you really care if your accountant roommate signs everything with CPA if it has nothing to do with their job? Would you even begin to know what sort of alphabet soup credentials he might have that he could add? What about your drinking buddy who's a plumber, does he need to sign his bar receipts with his Journey level?
 

gotbeerz001

Forum Deputy Chief
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Yes, because those are remotely similar. People should be proud of their accomplishments. If a person putting a few letters behind their name is really that much of a problem for you I think the issue may lie with you and not the letters.
I'm not sure I have a "problem" with it... But like somebody who plasters their vehicle with responder-themed stickers, it is a sign of being new and excited. If I then heard that you were a 10-year basic slinging war stories of your illustrious IFT career, then I would have a good idea who you are; I'd ask you some World of Warcraft question followed by your ham radio call sign and where your next reenactor gig will be.
 

DesertMedic66

Forum Troll
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I still love when I see medics in my area sign with "MICP". That is not our job title (no where in my area of SoCal uses Mobile Intensive Care Paramedics) and the ones I have seen use it do not have any critical care training or experience.
 

ExpatMedic0

MS, NRP
Premium Member
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Courtesy of the NREMT official Facebook page


National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT)
September 20, 2012 ·


"How to Use Your New Professional Provider Level Designation

During the next four years everyone in EMS will be going through a "transition" from levels of certification designated in the 1990's to new titles with new interventions and responsibilities. These new titles result in new post-nominal letters--the abbreviations placed after your name to identify the achievement of educational degrees, certifications, office/positions, and/or honors.
Current Nationally Certified (active and inactive) individuals are authorized and entitled to display the following post-nominal letters beginning at the following dates:

EMR and EMT Providers
If you took your initial exam at one of these levels or transitioned to one of the new levels through recertification (and received your new NREMT certification card), you can use the new NREMR or NREMT professional designations immediately.

PARAMEDIC Providers
The new NRP designation will become effective in January 2013. When you take your initial exam after January 2013, your new certification card will reflect this new provider level and you can start using this new designation. If you currently hold NREMT-P certification, you may use the new designation once you have completed your state approved transition and receive your new NREMT certification card, indicating Paramedic as the provider level.

AEMT Providers
If you took the new AEMT course after June 1, 2011 you can use the new NRAEMT designation.

You may not continue to display the above post-nominal letters if your national certification is expired, revoked, or lapses for any reason. The NREMT does not recognize any other post-nominal letters or variations on the above.

In general, educational degrees precede professional credentials. Typically, only the highest degree obtained is used when you must achieve one credential in order to obtain another (for example, since you must be an EMT in order to be eligible to be a Paramedic, only the designation NRP is necessary.)

Usually, all professional credentials are listed in the order they were earned. For example, all of the following are correct:

John Smith, AS, NREMR
Jane Doe, BSN, RN, NRP, CCRN
John Doe, MEd, NRAMET
Jane Smith, NREMT


You have worked hard to earn and maintain your national EMS certification and the NREMT encourages you to proudly distinguish yourself by using the appropriate post-nominal letters in your professional communications and documentation. Achieving and maintaining national EMS certification is a considerable professional and personal accomplishment that deserves to be recognized. We encourage all current nationally certified EMS professionals to proudly display the above credentials in recognition of your considerable accomplishment and dedicated service."
 

ThadeusJ

Forum Lieutenant
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Right after I completed my MBA I read an article from a recruiter that stated that he'd toss resumes that placed "MBA" after their names because that was bragging and not a professional designation (along with BSc, BA, etc). Yes you can be proud but do it on your own time and not as advertising. It was rather deflating since I accomplished it part-time while working full time as well as having a part time gig as a flight RT (plus 3 little kids). But when I signed the charts, does anyone really care? Afterwards I got a chuckle when I met people who earned a BSc and was waving it about and I casually mention, "Well, I have one too as well as a MBA. Good for you now get back to work".
 

ERDoc

Forum Asst. Chief
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I just don't get the need to boast about your credentials/certs when it is irrelevant. When I email my kids cub scout leader, they really don't care that I am an MD. They care about how much popcorn was sold. Even in professional related communication the alphabet soup is unnecessary and comes off as attention seeking. The only time I think it is relevant is when you are lecturing or giving a presentation. It lets your audience know your level of expertise. Do people seriously put things like IV and EKG? Good to know. I will start signing my stuff:

ERDoc, MD, BSc, ATLS, ACLS, BLS, CPR, AED, CVL, IV, EKG, Chest tube, Intubation and difficult airway, Cardioversion, Splinting, Suturing, Stapling, Procedural Sedation, Foreign Body Removal, All Round Nice Guy

I don't even write MD on my charts. I figure the pre-printed part underneath the line where I put my signature that says, "Physician Signature" gets the point across.
 

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