Will a breakdown on the job likely end in termination?

Logan Bounds

Forum Ride Along
7
2
3
Just saying man. If you can't learn to separate life and work you really aren't fit for the job. This job requires you to be able to separate this out because if you don't then you'll become my patient if I was your partner. In any of our training scene safety is a must, and by you doing all that you have explained is not being safe my friend. Either get your sh*t straight at home or go find another job that won't be requiring you to take someone else's life in your hands. If a "freak out" happened on a call you would be done for. You would be ruled with abondobment for not being able to fulfill you duties as EMS, which is an absolute must.
 

Seirende

Washed Up Paramedic
665
331
63
The question of whether you're likely to be involuntarily removed from the job, and the question of whether you should consider taking a step back are separate considerations. Do you feel that there is potential for this to repeat itself? If so, you need to throw your personal resources into your own care right now. Even if you believe that you can avoid another breakdown at work, you've said that this tends to create difficulties for you outside of EMS.

Your personal wellbeing is worth more than your job. Please consider taking some time away to give yourself more of a chance to become psychologically healthy and fit.

If you want to continue to pursue this work, pursuing your own health is the first step. Get advice and support from people who know you in addition to knowing the job.
 

Gurby

Forum Asst. Chief
811
583
93
I was analyzing the emotion love. I was thinking deeply about it and gaining feedback from articles written by psychologists and feedback from people online.

I am a deep thinker. If I get a topic on my mind my thoughts can consume my thinking process.

The job in itself does not bother me. I love my job and feel like it is my niche. It is the external crap in life that I get hooked on and it interferes with any job I have.

So to specifically target EMS and say that particular job is not right for me is a wrongful assumption. The issue is not job-related whatsoever
Have you had these episodes your entire life, or did they start sometime in the past few years? Does this happen to anyone else in your family?
 

SandpitMedic

Crowd pleaser
Premium Member
2,229
1,194
113
Just... Lol all over this.

Holy smokes.
 

gotbeerz001

Forum Deputy Chief
1,312
926
113
Also, everyone know that LOVE is like running on a treadmill of nails and glass while trying to juggle with 'The Notebook' playing repeatedly on a big screen in front of you... What is there to think about?

(I need a drink)
 
Last edited:

terrible one

Always wandering
881
87
28
Analyzing the emotion of love caused you to mentally breakdown??? What the heck?!?! Is there anymore to this or what??
Please for the safety of your co-workers and patients resign and get some mental evaluation.
 

CentralCalEMT

Forum Captain
251
85
28
It is not your job to determine if EMS is right for me or not. If I feel it is right for me, then I will pursue it.
That is one of the most selfish things I have seen on this forum. Because you "feel" something is right, you will do it? What if you are not the right person for the job? What do feelings have to do with whether or not you are a competent provider? Where do your patients come into play? Based on what you have said in your posts, you life is completely controlled by feelings and emotions. EMS is a stressful job, and that being controlled so completely by feelings and emotions that they evoke such a strong response in you at times is very dangerous for you, your partner, and your patients. The patients deserve the best care possible. Is it OK to jeopardize patient care because you feel like EMS is right for you, when in fact it is not? Let me say it again; EMS is NOT about you. It is about your patients. Do you think you can provide adequate care when you are in that emotional state? Even if it happens infrequently, it is still a risk. What would have happened if you were the only unit available when you were having your breakdown and a cardiac arrest call or critical trauma went out? Would those people have died because you were overly emotional from "analyzing the emotion of love" and thus unable to respond? At that point you can "feel" you are the best EMS provider in the world, but the reality is you are not.

EMS requires a level of mental and emotional maturity that not everyone has. It does not mean you are a bad person. It just means that it is possible the job is not for you. EMS is a stressful job, and the stress does not lessen the more experience you have. While clinical decisions may be easier with experience, there will always be emotional trauma involved with EMS. With the depression, alcoholism, PTSD, and even suicide attempts that are becoming increasingly prevalent in this field, you need to take a long hard look at whether you are qualified for the job mentally and emotionally, irregardless of how you feel. There is a big difference between having the head knowledge to work EMS and being a qualified provider. Especially given the source of the breakdown, you need a moment of self reflection here. It was not like you had a horrific call or found out a loved one had died unexpectedly. Please, for the sake of you, your partners and your patients, seek out a qualified mental health professional and seek guidance from him or her.
 

mlboncea35D

Forum Ride Along
8
4
3
Just a thought: if you go to your bosses and say, "Hey, look, I realize what I did was inappropriate. I found a mental health therapist and I'm going to see her." you might have a chance of saving your job. As it is now, I'd fire you. And I'm not an EMT.

There are low cost/sliding scale therapists out there. Even if I had to sign up for my state's Medicaid program, or pay out of pocket, if I were acting as you did, I'd go find one.
 

46Young

Level 25 EMS Wizard
3,063
89
48
That is one of the most selfish things I have seen on this forum. Because you "feel" something is right, you will do it? What if you are not the right person for the job? What do feelings have to do with whether or not you are a competent provider? Where do your patients come into play? Based on what you have said in your posts, you life is completely controlled by feelings and emotions. EMS is a stressful job, and that being controlled so completely by feelings and emotions that they evoke such a strong response in you at times is very dangerous for you, your partner, and your patients. The patients deserve the best care possible. Is it OK to jeopardize patient care because you feel like EMS is right for you, when in fact it is not? Let me say it again; EMS is NOT about you. It is about your patients. Do you think you can provide adequate care when you are in that emotional state? Even if it happens infrequently, it is still a risk. What would have happened if you were the only unit available when you were having your breakdown and a cardiac arrest call or critical trauma went out? Would those people have died because you were overly emotional from "analyzing the emotion of love" and thus unable to respond? At that point you can "feel" you are the best EMS provider in the world, but the reality is you are not.

EMS requires a level of mental and emotional maturity that not everyone has. It does not mean you are a bad person. It just means that it is possible the job is not for you. EMS is a stressful job, and the stress does not lessen the more experience you have. While clinical decisions may be easier with experience, there will always be emotional trauma involved with EMS. With the depression, alcoholism, PTSD, and even suicide attempts that are becoming increasingly prevalent in this field, you need to take a long hard look at whether you are qualified for the job mentally and emotionally, irregardless of how you feel. There is a big difference between having the head knowledge to work EMS and being a qualified provider. Especially given the source of the breakdown, you need a moment of self reflection here. It was not like you had a horrific call or found out a loved one had died unexpectedly. Please, for the sake of you, your partners and your patients, seek out a qualified mental health professional and seek guidance from him or her.
The OP just does this part time. Imagine if they were operating FT + hrs. in a busy system like ATC-EMS. This article about employee suicides comes to mind:

http://www.austinchronicle.com/news/2015-05-08/high-stress-at-ems/

We've probably scared off the OP at this point. No use beating a dead horse. I think part of the reason why so many people responded negatively towards the OP is because many of us have had to deal with unstable partners at our own place of employment. It's no fun when you get stuck with one of them.
 

toyskater86

Forum Lieutenant
205
48
28
EMS is very stressful on many levels, emotional, physical, psychological....if you are already dealing with these issues outside of your EMS job, then EMS is not for you, for your own benefit and that of you patients/partners.
 

46Young

Level 25 EMS Wizard
3,063
89
48
The job can be stressful enough without having to handle your co-worker's baggage as well. Enough of us have stressors at home, and would prefer to use work as a break from the drama.
 

RocketMedic

Californian, Lost in Texas
4,723
1,336
113
Tnaemt, you're not right for this profession.
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
1,218
443
83
At the risk of extending the life of this thread beyond its usefulness, let me just suggest we go back and reread the original post.

This is a 21-year-old asking for help. I don't think personal impressions matter much right now. The question is whether there are any suggestions that might be helpful to him. Maybe he's just not expressing himself well. Maybe he's messed up. Maybe he's even a danger to others; if so, how many of the comments here would actually change that?

I'm not sure the priority should be to scare him away from EMS. That doesn't mean he has a long, prosperous career ahead in this field; I'm just saying pretend he's your partner.
 

Ridryder911

EMS Guru
5,922
38
48
The profession requires and has written criteria for physical health (ability to lift, function capabilities, etc) and many (as should be required) have psychological requirements as well. Within the scope of this profession; it should be understood that the daily work grind, factors and exposure can disrupt those that have difficulties (physical and mental).

Not everyone is capable providing EMS, or should be allowed into EMS; just alike many other professions. That is not being rude, just to the truth. Many can qualify physically for law enforcement but yet fail the mental or psychological screening (there is a reason they require this). Not that they are bad person, just able to meet that requirement.... We in EMS should require the same. As I have heard, not everyone can be an astronaut.

Can you be fired? Yes, as most corporations and companies have subtle but legal definition of work behavior and professional conduct. I do hope you explore more into seeking mental health evaluation (just as I would recommend anyone to seek medical treatment) before considering entering and pursuing EMS. This profession is very rough as we are seeing the end results. Outbursts with minimal or no trigger event; not related to work environment should not be ever tolerated for the reasons as stated above.

I am sure we all wish you the best!

R/r911
 

chaz90

Community Leader
Community Leader
2,735
1,270
113
We may have beat this dead horse enough.

@Tnaemt94, has this outlived its usefulness or are you still looking for more advice?
 

Top