What schools are providing an excellent education?

Seirende

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Biographical background: I'm thinking about getting back into EMS eventually. I left the field because of severe depression, which was eventually diagnosed as bipolar II after being misdiagnosed for years as MDD. It took a while to settle on a medication, but I've been on the same medication for almost a year and have seen great results with it. I really enjoyed EMS and I felt that I was an adequate provider. However, it's been a couple years now and while I have kept up my license I wouldn't feel comfortable going back without refreshing my education. I'm single and could easily travel for school and since I already have a state license I don't need to worry about reciprocity for my education. I would just like the best education I can get. I won't be going back for probably a couple years due to (happy) life circumstances, but it doesn't hurt to start looking.

So if you were in my shoes and could go to school anywhere in the US, where would it be?
 

mgr22

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If you're mostly interested in getting up to speed as a paramedic, I think your time would be better spent riding with experienced crews in busy systems. I bet you could arrange those ride-alongs if you were willing to sign the appropriate waivers and "work" for free.

If you wanted to supplement those practical exercises with academic material, you could buy the most up-to-date edition of a paramedic textbook, read it at your own pace, and maybe take a few alphabet refreshers.

It sounds like you have the means and opportunity to pursue lots of options other than EMS. Consider that before you retreat to what you know. In my experience, it's easier to avoid the negatives of past experiences than it is to duplicate the positives.
 

Remi

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If you're mostly interested in getting up to speed as a paramedic, I think your time would be better spent riding with experienced crews in busy systems. I bet you could arrange those ride-alongs if you were willing to sign the appropriate waivers and "work" for free.

If you wanted to supplement those practical exercises with academic material, you could buy the most up-to-date edition of a paramedic textbook, read it at your own pace, and maybe take a few alphabet refreshers.

It sounds like you have the means and opportunity to pursue lots of options other than EMS. Consider that before you retreat to what you know. In my experience, it's easier to avoid the negatives of past experiences than it is to duplicate the positives.
I think this is good advice ^^
 

Seirende

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If you're mostly interested in getting up to speed as a paramedic, I think your time would be better spent riding with experienced crews in busy systems. I bet you could arrange those ride-alongs if you were willing to sign the appropriate waivers and "work" for free.

If you wanted to supplement those practical exercises with academic material, you could buy the most up-to-date edition of a paramedic textbook, read it at your own pace, and maybe take a few alphabet refreshers.

It sounds like you have the means and opportunity to pursue lots of options other than EMS. Consider that before you retreat to what you know. In my experience, it's easier to avoid the negatives of past experiences than it is to duplicate the positives.
At this point I'd feel more comfortable just retaking a class. It's been two years, I'm young, time and money aren't much of an issue, I'd like to start fresh. I struggle with self-study, but thrive in a classroom.

I really did enjoy EMS. I mean there are obvious drawbacks, but that's going to be any field. I just want to do work that gives me self-respect, that I like, and that pays enough to pay the bills and save for retirement. The bill-paying part is easy enough as a single lady with inexpensive tastes.

Edit: When I say self-respect, I don't mean a hero complex. I get self-respect from any job that allows me to work to get good at my job and that I feel is good for the community. I get self-respect from my current job at a grocery store because I work hard there.
 
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DrParasite

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Why don't you get a job? I understand your concern, but working part time on an ambulance, volunteering for a local EMS agency, whatever. You can go through the class again, but you already passed it once. Work under an FTO, acclimate yourself to how they do things.

Honestly, if I was in your shoes, traveling to take an EMS course would not be at the top of my list. Traveling to work for a good EMS agency would be. Especially one that runs an paid EMS academy, where they will go over everything and teach you how they expect things to be done. But that's just me
 

Aprz

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I know everyone keeps saying it, but going back to school is a bad idea. Paramedic schools often don't make great paramedics. A lot of it is self taught or hands on. At the same time, when you get hired, you'll be going through an academy that's sorta like a refresher. You'll have an FTO time sorta like your internship. I personally wouldn't waste my time or money.
 

DesertMedic66

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I know everyone keeps saying it, but going back to school is a bad idea. Paramedic schools often don't make great paramedics. A lot of it is self taught or hands on. At the same time, when you get hired, you'll be going through an academy that's sorta like a refresher. You'll have an FTO time sorta like your internship. I personally wouldn't waste my time or money.
That isn’t necessarily true. Some companies will hire you and send you through a bare bones FTO process to make sure you know how to do the bare minimum to get the company paid.
 

VentMonkey

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So if you were in my shoes and could go to school anywhere in the US, where would it be?
Eastern Kentucky (EKU) or Creighton. Both have bachelors degrees tied to their paramedic programs and seem to value education.

The latter has a solid semesters worth of critical care education as an option as well.
 

GMCmedic

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Eastern Kentucky (EKU) or Creighton. Both have bachelors degrees tied to their paramedic programs and seem to value education.

The latter has a solid semesters worth of critical care education as an option as well.
Thanks for this. I looked into it and my medic and existing credits transfer for a bachelors in Emergency Services Administration at EKU (online too). Not that I want to ride a desk but its a degree.
 

VentMonkey

Ajaw
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Thanks for this. I looked into it and my medic and existing credits transfer for a bachelors in Emergency Services Administration at EKU (online too). Not that I want to ride a desk but its a degree.
There’s a lot of talk about mandating CCP into an undergrad degree. I don’t know how much is soft vs. hard talk ATM. I’m in the same boat re: an administrative-driven degree though.

I’d bet Creighton or U of F would be front runners if so. Also worth mentioning, you can apparently get your masters in critical care now as well...
 
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