What is the purpose of a shock from AED?

E tank

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So what if you had a strong electromagnet? Can that damage hearts?
If MRI scanners are any indication, no. If anything, there is some evidence that those kind of EM fields will decrease viscosity of arterial>venous blood and improve flow because of linear alignment of rbc's in the capillaries when so exposed... (don't ask how I know that...)
 

Tigger

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But if a lay person puts an AED on a patient patient who is unresponsive, but still has a pulse, and is VT it would infact shock them potentially causing VF. Probably highly unlikely but still possible.
The AED does not sync cardiovert. It is only capable of defibrillation.
I believe many AEDs can and do sync to R waves if identifiable. Here's an "interesting" case: https://www.jems.com/articles/print/volume-40/issue-12/departments-columns/case-of-the-month/school-policy-leads-nurse-to-shock-concious-boy-with-aed.html
 

mgr22

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According to that article, the 9-year-old pt was cardioverted at 200j. That would be a much higher energy level than recommended for, say, a 40kg kid (0.5-1j/kg), or even for an adult. It sounds more like a defib setting for an adult. Also, the story says the nurse waited 14 seconds to "push the button." Would an AED hold a charge that long? The story sounds kind of fishy to me.
 

DragonClaw

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According to that article, the 9-year-old pt was cardioverted at 200j. That would be a much higher energy level than recommended for, say, a 40kg kid (0.5-1j/kg), or even for an adult. It sounds more like a defib setting for an adult.
What settings do AEDs have for the output? Is it all automatic?
 

RocketMedic

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A lot of AEDs actually rely on the pads to absorb excess energy instead of attempting different settings.
 

Tigger

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According to that article, the 9-year-old pt was cardioverted at 200j. That would be a much higher energy level than recommended for, say, a 40kg kid (0.5-1j/kg), or even for an adult. It sounds more like a defib setting for an adult. Also, the story says the nurse waited 14 seconds to "push the button." Would an AED hold a charge that long? The story sounds kind of fishy to me.
If a pediatric dose attenuator was not attached to the pads (ie adult pads were used), then this would likely be possible perhaps?
 

E tank

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Immediately afterward the patient said that he felt better.

Got to be more to that story.... or that kid is a Class 1A stud....
 

mgr22

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Immediately afterward the patient said that he felt better.

Got to be more to that story.... or that kid is a Class 1A stud....
I missed that part, but it's certainly another reason to wonder about the whole story. I'm not sure a shock was ever delivered.
 

E tank

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I missed that part, but it's certainly another reason to wonder about the whole story. I'm not sure a shock was ever delivered.
Sounds like the device recorded the whole deal. SVT coincidentally broke just as she hit the button? Some weird post traumatic amnesia? The most interesting part of the whole report and they left it out....
 

RocketMedic

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What do you mean? How does this work?
A "pediatric dose attenuator" (a resistor) in the circuit absorbs 1/2 or 3/4 of the pre-set 200J shock, depending on the brand.
 
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