Test advice for Mercy Air

CTMD

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I'm getting ready to start testing/applying to Mercy Air in Southern California and was wondering if anyone has any advice on what to study for their application test? I've begun studying using FlightBridgeEd but am wondering if there is anything else I should be doing in order to prepare for the test/interview. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

CANMAN

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Don't know about them specifically, but most HEMS programs tests are fairly standard material for the industry. I would have a rock solid grasp on standard ACLS & PALS stuff, good understand of standard ventilator modes, settings, and strategies. ABG interpretation. RSI knowledge to include indications & considerations, drugs, doses, procedure to include failed airway. Basic knowledge and dosing for things like Levophed, Vasopressin, Epi, Cardene, Esmolol, Labetalol, Propofol. Management of traumatic heads, ICH, AAA, Dissections, trauma scenarios, and maybe some high risk OB stuff. Our CC test doesn't include anything like Swans, IABP, or ECMO stuff, really just testing a baseline CC knowledge. Good luck.
 

DesertMedic66

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Don't know about them specifically, but most HEMS programs tests are fairly standard material for the industry. I would have a rock solid grasp on standard ACLS & PALS stuff, good understand of standard ventilator modes, settings, and strategies. ABG interpretation. RSI knowledge to include indications & considerations, drugs, doses, procedure to include failed airway. Basic knowledge and dosing for things like Levophed, Vasopressin, Epi, Cardene, Esmolol, Labetalol, Propofol. Management of traumatic heads, ICH, AAA, Dissections, trauma scenarios, and maybe some high risk OB stuff. Our CC test doesn't include anything like Swans, IABP, or ECMO stuff, really just testing a baseline CC knowledge. Good luck.
This is pretty much it for the Mercy Air - Air Methods exam. Have a solid understanding on ACLS, BLS CPR, PALS, PHTLS, RSI medications, etc.

Once you turn in your online application, if it meets their minimum qualifications they will email you to set up an online test. If you receive a good score then they will arrange an interview/patient assessment test.

Medic positions at Mercy go fast and there are usually a dozen applicants for open medic spots.
 

CTMD

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Don't know about them specifically, but most HEMS programs tests are fairly standard material for the industry. I would have a rock solid grasp on standard ACLS & PALS stuff, good understand of standard ventilator modes, settings, and strategies. ABG interpretation. RSI knowledge to include indications & considerations, drugs, doses, procedure to include failed airway. Basic knowledge and dosing for things like Levophed, Vasopressin, Epi, Cardene, Esmolol, Labetalol, Propofol. Management of traumatic heads, ICH, AAA, Dissections, trauma scenarios, and maybe some high risk OB stuff. Our CC test doesn't include anything like Swans, IABP, or ECMO stuff, really just testing a baseline CC knowledge. Good luck.
Are there any books you would recommend to gain a better grasp on vent strategies? Besides ABGs, do they test on and/or require knowledge or memorization of lab values?
 

CTMD

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This is pretty much it for the Mercy Air - Air Methods exam. Have a solid understanding on ACLS, BLS CPR, PALS, PHTLS, RSI medications, etc.

Once you turn in your online application, if it meets their minimum qualifications they will email you to set up an online test. If you receive a good score then they will arrange an interview/patient assessment test.

Medic positions at Mercy go fast and there are usually a dozen applicants for open medic spots.
By minimum requirements do you mean like minimum time of three years or is there something else that is also required? Does the patient assessment portion consist of IFT and scene scenarios or just one or the other? What are some of the ways you prepared for the exam to be successful?
 

DesertMedic66

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Are there any books you would recommend to gain a better grasp on vent strategies? Besides ABGs, do they test on and/or require knowledge or memorization of lab values?
For the entrance test you should know your main lab values (sodium, K+, Hgb, etc)
 

DesertMedic66

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By minimum requirements do you mean like minimum time of three years or is there something else that is also required? Does the patient assessment portion consist of IFT and scene scenarios or just one or the other? What are some of the ways you prepared for the exam to be successful?
The minimum requirements are listed on Air Methods/Mercy Air’s job flyers on their website.

The assessments change. They can be all scene or IFT or a mix.
 

SandpitMedic

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There are two tests, one for experienced flight medics and one for medics with no flight experience. If you have no vent experience you won’t get beat up for not having vent experience. The test is hard though.

At least that’s how it was when I went through, but I went through in the paper test era 4 or so years ago. I’m not sure if the online test is the same.

If you’re utilizing Flightbridge and other FP-C study materials you should be alright.

Median score is fairly low. You take the test again following a weeklong orientation/ critical care bootcamp if you’re hired. That’s the number that determines if you’ll make it through your 3rd rider probation.
 

DesertMedic66

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There are two tests, one for experienced flight medics and one for medics with no flight experience. If you have no vent experience you won’t get beat up for not having vent experience. The test is hard though.

At least that’s how it was when I went through, but I went through in the paper test era 4 or so years ago. I’m not sure if the online test is the same.

If you’re utilizing Flightbridge and other FP-C study materials you should be alright.

Median score is fairly low. You take the test again following a weeklong orientation/ critical care bootcamp if you’re hired. That’s the number that determines if you’ll make it through your 3rd rider probation.
Things have changed a little bit. Orientation is now 10 days. After it you take a test that is a “needs assessment”. The needs assessment test is much different than the entrance test and by much different I mean much more difficult. The average score on the test is around 70%.

You don’t really fail the test.Your score on the subjects gets sent to your clinical education manager so they can help you. We had a nurse who scored an 86% who was unsuccessful in his 3rd rider training and testing. On the other side we had a nurse score a 54% who was successful on her 3rd rider training and testing.
 

SandpitMedic

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Things have changed a little bit. Orientation is now 10 days. After it you take a test that is a “needs assessment”. The needs assessment test is much different than the entrance test and by much different I mean much more difficult. The average score on the test is around 70%.

You don’t really fail the test.Your score on the subjects gets sent to your clinical education manager so they can help you. We had a nurse who scored an 86% who was unsuccessful in his 3rd rider training and testing. On the other side we had a nurse score a 54% who was successful on her 3rd rider training and testing.
Ah I see. 10 days in Denver would be a great time!
So then what has remained the same is that the test is not a steadfast indicator of whether one will make it or not.
Do you still have to do an initial HPS and all the other CEs to graduate 3rd rider?
 

DesertMedic66

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Ah I see. 10 days in Denver would be a great time!
So then what has remained the same is that the test is not a steadfast indicator of whether one will make it or not.
Do you still have to do an initial HPS and all the other CEs to graduate 3rd rider?
Yep
 

VFlutter

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Ah I see. 10 days in Denver would be a great time!
So then what has remained the same is that the test is not a steadfast indicator of whether one will make it or not.
Do you still have to do an initial HPS and all the other CEs to graduate 3rd rider?
Denver is great, get drunk off one beer! The increase to 10 days really isn't more clinical education unfortunately. More so HR, general aviation, and safety stuff.

Yes you must complete all CEs, get 5 flights that involve critical interventions (i.e. vent or drip management, RSI, etc), and then take HPS

After the inital interview test there is another at the end of Denver which, as a preceptor, I feel is a good indicator for success in orientation. A low score usually means a general lack of critical care knowledge that will be a huge learning curve ontop of the sensory and informational overload that occurs.
 

DesertMedic66

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Denver is great, get drunk off one beer! The increase to 10 days really isn't more clinical education unfortunately. More so HR, general aviation, and safety stuff.

Yes you must complete all CEs, get 5 flights that involve critical interventions (i.e. vent or drip management, RSI, etc), and then take HPS

After the inital interview test there is another at the end of Denver which, as a preceptor, I feel is a good indicator for success in orientation. A low score usually means a general lack of critical care knowledge that will be a huge learning curve ontop of the sensory and informational overload that occurs.
It might depend on your area but we only needed 5 flights. It doesn’t matter what you did on those flights but as long as they were patient transports they counted.
 
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