Stopping at Still Alarms with Patient On Board?

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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It’s common on the West Coast and East Coast.
No, it's not. it's used among departments on both the east and west coast, but it's far from a standard, and definitely not common with a standard defintion.

your department might use them, but mine doesn't. doesn't make you right and me wrong, or me right, and you wrong. It's a local/regional term, and very department-specific. Stop generalizing; you're embarrassing yourself.
 

OceanBossMan263

Forum Crew Member
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Primarily, follow your workplace and/or state regulations.

I would imagine that most places would come down to either
1. Make appropriate notification and then continue to transport
2. Make appropriate notification, Assess for life safety issues, then continue to transport.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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Could be a regional thing, I've not heard of it before either.. <shrug>
are you really a fireman if you have never heard of or used this local term?
 
OP
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BobBarker

Forum Lieutenant
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Thanks guys. I sent an email to management. The policy I read in our Operating Guidelines does not specifically list a protocol for stopping at a still alarm with a patient on board, only a vague policy that reads stop, contact dispatch for additional units/fire/police, etc and treat the patient up to your scope of practice.
 

FiremanMike

EMS Coordinator
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are you really a fireman if you have never heard of or used this local term?
If you ask the fire dogs, I stopped being a fireman when I took my EMS coordinator spot..

Except for the handful of working fires I've made entry into or the training fires I've used my fire instructor card on since being on admin...

Got pulled into shift overtime a few weeks ago and the crew I rode put me on the engine.. One of the other crews through an absolute temper tantrum..

😁 🤣
 

CCCSD

Forum Asst. Chief
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I’m talking about the OP trying to figure out what to do. His agency has guidance, that was his original question.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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1,500
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Got pulled into shift overtime a few weeks ago and the crew I rode put me on the engine.. One of the other crews through an absolute temper tantrum..

😁 🤣
Did they have to go over with you that you need to pull the bale on the nozzle to get the water to come out? and it's truckies that eat the crayons, not the engine guys? 🤣
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
Community Leader
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Did they have to go over with you that you need to pull the bale on the nozzle to get the water to come out? and it's truckies that eat the crayons, not the engine guys? 🤣
Here (you know, regionally as they say), the medic crew eats the crayons in hopes of getting placed on an involuntary hold and therefore getting a break from the medic.
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
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Thanks guys. I sent an email to management. The policy I read in our Operating Guidelines does not specifically list a protocol for stopping at a still alarm with a patient on board, only a vague policy that reads stop, contact dispatch for additional units/fire/police, etc and treat the patient up to your scope of practice.
That "vague policy" sounds fine to me. I mean, it's not like management can predict the condition of either patient. You're going to have to use at least a little judgment, no?
 

WuLabsWuTecH

Forum Deputy Chief
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Sigh... we seem to have this happen every few years or so. When I was out in St. Louis and once more in a small industrial town, a "Still Alarm" just meant an EMS call that needed no fire response. It means different things to different people. Where I am now, that term is not used and has never been used in over 50 years
 

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