PulseOx for BLS, I need reasons!

emtbuff

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Ok our pulse ox is part of our automatic BP cuff which is kept in the rig. I know we had it bolted down at one point in time but now I think there is a strap that holds it down to the counter. So we usually don't use it unless we are on a transfer and monitoring of the pulse ox either has to be done or not. But at the hospital that I work at when I do vitals I check pulse ox every time.
 

Phridae

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We have a pulseOx in every truck, in the jump bag. Then, in the front line truck, we have a combo BP/SPO2 machine. Hardly gets used though. False reading with the bumps, its been named the boat anchor. Good for nothing else.

I think if we lost one of our pulseOx's, we'd all be dead. My chief would hang us all. Yep.
 

SCEMT-B

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:blink: Another tip Pulse Ox wont work on a pt with Parkinsons Desease, nor on anyone who is shaking violently, just wont get a good reading at all unless you change out the finger clamp with a strip and find a stable area to place the strip for a reading.
 

Ray1129

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Originally posted by SCEMT-B@Mar 22 2005, 11:16 PM
:blink: Another tip Pulse Ox wont work on a pt with Parkinsons Desease, nor on anyone who is shaking violently, just wont get a good reading at all unless you change out the finger clamp with a strip and find a stable area to place the strip for a reading.
It's also like that with cold fingers/toes. You won't get a reading, and if you do, it's usually wrong.
 

KEVD18

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cute toy but of negligible clinical value in the prehospital setting
 

cbdemt

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Originally posted by KEVD18@Apr 14 2005, 09:43 PM
cute toy but of negligible clinical value in the prehospital setting
I've got to disagree with ya on that. Its crucial to be able to monitor your pts O2 levels, its one of the few things that we B's can fix (or at least attempt to fix). Just a quick example off the top of my head... You get called for an unknown medical, find a pt that is conscious but disoriented and alone. It could be any number of things; OD, diabetic problem, hypoxia, or post ictal to name a few. If you can slap on a pulse ox it can at least point you in the right direction and allow you to focus your treatment a little better.

As for ALS in my area, pulse ox must be monitored before during and after med admin's.

I think it’s a very valuable tool (that is under used as far as I've seen).

Just my thoughts, be safe all!
 

ffemt8978

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We were called to to an 87yoF C/C abdominal pain. Upon arrival, we find the patient in obvious respiratory distress and C/O chest pain 10/10 that radiates around the right side to her back. Initial vitals: Pulse 200+ (too fast to count), Pulse on Pulse Ox 230, SPO2 on RA was 79%, patient was diaphoretic and had a HX of HTN and Renal Failure.

We put her on 15lpm O2 via NRB and do a PUHA to an ALS intercept. By the time we met with ALS, her pulse was 113, SPO2 was 96% and her pain was at a 5/10.

The reason I bring this call up is this. By our protocols, EMT-B's can only give 15lpm O2 via NRB. They can't dial it down if the patient doesn't need that much O2. As an EMT-IV, I can titrate the O2 to keep the patient's sats above 90%. Most of the time, I leave it a 15lpm (as I did in this case), but sometimes I will drop it down to 10lpm. It's nice to have that option for certain patients (COPD), and if it requires a Pulse Ox, then so be it.

I know we're all taught that we don't treat our equipment, but treat the patient instead. However, Pulse Ox before and after the administration of O2 is a great way to determine how effective the O2 is.
 
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