Options for "first in" backpacks

rwik123

Forum Asst. Chief
718
7
18
Doing some research on some options for my service on ems backpacks. We run into many situations where carrying a large shoulder bag in inconvenient or a hassle. Having a backpack would free up hands and make menuvering more feasible. Does anyone have any experience with bags of these nature? If possible it would be great if O2 could be integrated into it. Other than that, basic bandaging, BLS meds, ect thats normally included in a BLS bag. Ive been looking at STOMP like medic kits but they can't include oxygen. Would love to hear people's suggestions!
 

d0nk3yk0n9

Forum Crew Member
51
0
0

Veneficus

Forum Chief
7,301
16
0
Just a thought, but you might want to consider 2 bags to spread out the load a little instead of having 1 person carrying 70 lbs of gear.
 
OP
OP
rwik123

rwik123

Forum Asst. Chief
718
7
18
Just a thought, but you might want to consider 2 bags to spread out the load a little instead of having 1 person carrying 70 lbs of gear.

Good point. I don't think we are ready or willing to convert all truck bags to backpack, the backpacks for now will be used for event and sports standby that we get contracted to do that involve walking around fields and long distances. These standbys are done by one emt. So its either one kit that includes O2 + medical supplies + the zoll e series. Or a backpack, 02 kit, and zoll.
 

adamjh3

Forum Culinary Powerhouse
1,873
6
0
Good point. I don't think we are ready or willing to convert all truck bags to backpack, the backpacks for now will be used for event and sports standby that we get contracted to do that involve walking around fields and long distances. These standbys are done by one emt. So its either one kit that includes O2 + medical supplies + the zoll e series. Or a backpack, 02 kit, and zoll.

I work event stand by, and I know what you mean by all the equipment being cumbersome. I have three separate bags (trauma, airway, and splinting) plus a cooler full of ice packs.

I like the idea of the Mobil-medic trauma/O2 bags but they have been out of stock for a few months now. This thread has re-kindled my interest, so I just sent them an e-mail asking when they anticipate having them back in stock. I'll let you know what I learn.
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
Community Leader
7,846
2,801
113
We use the all-in-one first in bag at the ambulance job. It's a large Ferno bag called the Trauma/Air Management or something. It's plenty big enough for a BLS bag and easily takes a D cylinder. It has a backpack harness that you can tuck away when you're not using it. I've used the backpack part in highrises before, it actually worked pretty well.
 

Dr.T

Forum Probie
27
0
1
I know I'm European and this is a German manufacturer, but me and most EMS workers here love their products.
Try www.pax-bags.com
Hit "English" in the bottom left corner and browse the shop.
Most companies in Germany use the "Wasserkuppe" bagpack series.
 

Handsome Robb

Youngin'
Premium Member
9,736
1,173
113
We use Thomas Pack ALS bags.

You could definitely replace the IV kits with an O2 cylinder. We have a separate ALS airway bag so no cylinder or airway stuff in our First Out bags.

http://www.thomasems.com/ALS-Packs.html
 

OzAmbo

Forum Crew Member
96
1
0
Seriously, before you go looking for a bag, get out all the gear you want to put in it, then decide what you actually need in it and then select a bag around that - but with the caveat it has some chance to grow if you need it. You'd be amazed how much garbage EMS carries that you dont actually need.

"Spare stuff" as a "just in case" drives me nuts.

Can highly recommend statpacks though :D
 

NomadicMedic

I know a guy who knows a guy.
12,102
6,849
113
My service runs all ALS intercept and we carry our gear in two StatPacks. The "perfusion" model. One in red and one in black. The red bag has an O2 cylinder, med pouch, IV wrap, adult intubation kit, BVM and some other small stuff. The Black bag is the "secondary" bag and has second line meds, the IO drill and some other lesser used gear. Our SOPs require that we carry one bag as a backpack to reduce shoulder injuries, following a study of OTJ repetitive motions.
 

Bullets

Forum Knucklehead
1,600
222
63
My BLS agency used to carry these bags
http://veralph.com/Default.aspx?pag...gen+Cases*0@@84*Q.A.+Quick-Access+Pack*2160@@

But they are HUGE bags that are truly designed for ALS services.

We have since switched to Meret Omni bags
http://www.theemsstore.com/store/pr...-OMNI-PRO-EMS-BLS-ALS-Equipment-Bag-TS-Ready/

They can both be used as a back pack or a shoulder bag. I like the Merets, one other agency uses the Recover bags with large modular pouches on the sides, and they are strictly a backpack
 

adamjh3

Forum Culinary Powerhouse
1,873
6
0
My BLS agency used to carry these bags
http://veralph.com/Default.aspx?pag...gen+Cases*0@@84*Q.A.+Quick-Access+Pack*2160@@

But they are HUGE bags that are truly designed for ALS services.

We have since switched to Meret Omni bags
http://www.theemsstore.com/store/pr...-OMNI-PRO-EMS-BLS-ALS-Equipment-Bag-TS-Ready/

They can both be used as a back pack or a shoulder bag. I like the Merets, one other agency uses the Recover bags with large modular pouches on the sides, and they are strictly a backpack

In what role does your service utilize the Omni bag (on an ambulance, doing event stand by, on a bike, etc)?

Have you ever found it lacking for space or found it difficult to access certain areas of the bag?

How easily can the O2 tank be accessed? I take it from the pictures there's a velcro flap or something similar on the side of the bag that you can access it from, but I want to make sure.
 

Bosco836

Forum Lieutenant
155
1
18
We use the StatPacks BackUp as our primary bag (we're BLS first-response). We have their O2 module and a couple of their "Small Universal" modules in ours to help keep things organized.

We use the StatePacks BackUp bag as well. Although I like the bag insofar as organizational options are concerned, we have noticed a higher (than expected) failure rate with the zippers on our bag. Not sure if we just ended up with a lemon or if this is a more widespread problem.

I've also had good look with TrevorOwenLtd bags. Land EMS is this area uses them almost extensively and they seem to hold up rather well. Many of the bags are very similar to the (now defunct) Pacific Safety bags. They have a backpack option which can be found here - http://www.trevorowenltd.com/r200_rescue_backpack.htm.

Edit: I should also note that TrevorOwenLtd is generally pretty good at any sort of custom design requests too in the event that you have a particular request and/or feature in mind that you want built into the bag.

Cheers,
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Bullets

Forum Knucklehead
1,600
222
63
In what role does your service utilize the Omni bag (on an ambulance, doing event stand by, on a bike, etc)?

Have you ever found it lacking for space or found it difficult to access certain areas of the bag?

How easily can the O2 tank be accessed? I take it from the pictures there's a velcro flap or something similar on the side of the bag that you can access it from, but I want to make sure.

It is the primary entry bag on our BLS ambulances. I still think its too big but our squad has an infection of gauze and i cant get rid of it. the dividers it comes with are modular, everything is velcro so you can change anything. O2 tank can be accessed from the end, the whole end i velcroed closed and rips open for quick connection. I wear it as a backpack while using the stairchair, and the o2 tubing goes right around me to the patient, so much simpler.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
11,322
48
48
Backpack notes:
First, are the straps sewn in on either or both end(s) by sewing the into the welt which unites the sides to the back panel of the main compartment?n If so, they will tear free eventually. They should be separately sewn on with a "X" seam surrounded by a square "box" seam, and the back panel they are sewn onto should be reinforced or even have straps sewn the entire length for reinforcement. Second, the zippers need to be brawny and doubled. Third, of course the fabric needs to be heavy-duty. Fourth, any velcro needs to be substantial; ideally, all exteriors are zippers not velcro. Fifth, elastic stretches out eventually. Sixth, mesh catches on stuff.

We did an ALS response bag with D cylinder of O2, AED, 500 ml IV etc etc in an Iron Duck duffle; ungainly, and it weighed 72 lbs. Splitting it makes most sense, and the non-O2 one can be shorter.

If it were me, I'd use an ALICE or similar system. Our solution was to put it on wheels; the bag rested in a milk crate zip tied to a folding luggage handcart as a testbed, and lasted through four years of hard use before the wheels gave out.
 

Bullets

Forum Knucklehead
1,600
222
63
Backpack notes:
First, are the straps sewn in on either or both end(s) by sewing the into the welt which unites the sides to the back panel of the main compartment?n If so, they will tear free eventually. They should be separately sewn on with a "X" seam surrounded by a square "box" seam, and the back panel they are sewn onto should be reinforced or even have straps sewn the entire length for reinforcement. Second, the zippers need to be brawny and doubled. Third, of course the fabric needs to be heavy-duty. Fourth, any velcro needs to be substantial; ideally, all exteriors are zippers not velcro. Fifth, elastic stretches out eventually. Sixth, mesh catches on stuff.

We did an ALS response bag with D cylinder of O2, AED, 500 ml IV etc etc in an Iron Duck duffle; ungainly, and it weighed 72 lbs. Splitting it makes most sense, and the non-O2 one can be shorter.

If it were me, I'd use an ALICE or similar system. Our solution was to put it on wheels; the bag rested in a milk crate zip tied to a folding luggage handcart as a testbed, and lasted through four years of hard use before the wheels gave out.

I like the Meret Bags for that reason, the shoulder straps are sewn through the seams, but they run down into the bag and are sewn to the back of the bag. Its actually one continuous loop of webbing with padding added.

A entry bag that needs to be wheeled sounds...impractical
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
11,322
48
48
It was the only mobile ALS kit for a fifteen acre correctional facility. Happily we never needed to try it in mud or even grass. Actually, if the setting is civilized, it works pretty well, as does a wheelchair; they go where a person can usually walk, and if the kit can come off the wheels and be carried the rest of the way, all the better...only don't expect to find the wheels there later!

The continuous loop is great, and padding makes it better. The epitome would be the little strap which pulls the two shoulder straps together over the sternum..."sternal strap"? That means the two straps are partially balancing their own weights against one another.
dsc_03931-400x267.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top