Reuben De La O

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Hi everyone,
I just obtained my EMT License in Iowa and I'm working toward my Paramedic next fall. I will have my paramedic diploma next year and I'll have my AAS in paramedic in 2018. I'm looking at different places to work and these two had came up. I just have a couple questions about both departments if someone would be willing to help answer.

1. What are the shifts like in both places? Do they run 24hr shifts or 12?

2. What is starting pay for both departments?

3. What is the hiring process?

4. Is there a minimum age to work for either place?

5. If I'm NREMT-P certified, will I be granted Reciprocity in either place?

Thank you in advance for your help!
 

akflightmedic

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Well...first of all you should call it FDNY or they will drag you across hot coals.

Second, there is a thread on here for FDNY candidates. From what little I know, be prepared to have residency established in NYC first and then be prepared to wait about 3 years or more to get hired! LOL, I do not know if it is still that bad (it once was worse).

I am going to back out before I misspeak and let other more informed people step up, but you have a long road ahead of you for that route. Good Luck!
 
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Reuben De La O

Reuben De La O

Forum Ride Along
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I apologize for messing up the FDNY when typing it! Just looking for answers. I'm closer to Chicago, I just am interested in New York.
 

STXmedic

Forum Burnout
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Big, inner-city EMS seems cool. It gets old quick, though. Burnout tends to be very high (first hand experience), and the closer you are to hospitals, the less and less you actually do as a paramedic (mainly because you have less time to manage patients, and often narrower protocols because a wider scope just isn't necessary).

But to each his own. @46Young is pretty familiar with the NYC area I believe. I can't think of anyone around the Chicago area that regularly posts here, but I'm sure there are some lurkers.

And yes, using NYFD is nearly a slur to some... Lol
 

Tony431

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Im a FF/Medic in the metro area of Chicago. I have 2 friends that work for CFD as medics and they are hoping to transfer over to the fire side soon. They love the schedule 1 on/3 off, many opportunities on the EMS side, good money after 3/4yrs, $$LOTS OF Overtime after 1 year of probation, have to live in the city limits 6 mos after being hired(they physically come check and knock your door late at night) They both said pt care can be sub-par bc there is a hospital on every corner( approx 88 hospitals in Chicago city limits), but they run approx 20-30 calls a shift...I would suggest try CFD as a medic- good resume material and you will get a lot of good calls and become an aggressive medic. If you dont like it you can always apply elswhere(good resume stuff) CFD hire medics every 4/5 years, no experience needed- info is online..Usually a short list so your chances are really really great. Rumor is last list they only had 400-600 ppl apply.. Problem is nobody really wants to live in Chicago city limits- low crime areas are VERY expensive and Chi is a very very segregated city. I live in an ok and diverse area but many areas are sketchy and petty crime all over- you become use to hearing abt all of the homicides and daily gun-play...I moved back 5 yrs ago from the East coast and chi-town mos def a diff type of metro city..You have to Consider the potential violence if you get hired. ITS REAL! Some ppl cant deal with the potential violence and the news/media do "too great of a job" keeping us aware of it.
 

akflightmedic

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Tony, you gave a good post and I am not picking on you, just gonna highlight some of your comments so others who are considering it can have food for thought (and to satisfy my own curiosity).

You stated care can be sub-par due to a hospital on every corner (88 hospitals!! That baffles my mind), but then you go on to say you will become an aggressive medic. This is the part I do not understand. With short transport times and high call volume, how is that aggressive? I just want to make sure we are defining it the same way because I envision it as having little time to do much of anything and it would seem far easier to be a minimalist and transport. I guess if you mean trying to be the Tazmanian Devil and cramming in a lot is aggressive, then I understand/

Does this type of environment lend itself to creating a better, stronger paramedic in the long run? To you, is there a difference between aggressive and progressive?

How do you think you, or some of your colleagues who have done the inner city stuff for years would fare on a transport of 30+ minutes, or in a lot of cases across the nation 45+ minutes with the patient?

(again note, not picking a fight, just stimulating dialogue)
 
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