NREMT and me...

Jay114

Forum Crew Member
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I have read a bunch of posts about national and state licensing, as well as some threads pertaining to my state, Massachusetts, and it's licensing/reciprocity rules. My question is this: Other than being able to work across state lines, is there any benefit to being licensed by my state and NREMT? Any and all responses will be appreciated; unless they are rude, then I denounce them completely:p
 

SwissEMT

Forum Lieutenant
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I have read a bunch of posts about national and state licensing, as well as some threads pertaining to my state, Massachusetts, and it's licensing/reciprocity rules. My question is this: Other than being able to work across state lines, is there any benefit to being licensed by my state and NREMT? Any and all responses will be appreciated; unless they are rude, then I denounce them completely:p

Just as a heads up, it doesn't mean you can work across state lines. It simply makes reciprocity processes easier.

It looks good on resumes as well as job applications. In all the EMS companies I have applied to in MA, they've asked if I had one. Not sure of the value, but if I can add one more line to my resume, I'll get it!
 

Medic51

Forum Probie
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I have had a few people come to my agency from out of state and are having a very hard time getting there state cert simply cause they never took registery and in texas it is required, now they have to take it to even get there patch.
 

bstone

Forum Deputy Chief
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NREMT is perhaps one of the most frustrating and annoying organizations I know of.

They are also absolutely essential.

Get your NREMT card and don't let it lapse. Last thing you want is to have to test NREMT in 5 years from now.
 

Ridryder911

EMS Guru
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Really thinking of this as a career? Then, take the NREMT. Registry, is not any more difficult than any other healthcare certification organization, they all are a pain...

R/r 911
 

Alexakat

Forum Lieutenant
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When I took my course in Florida a few years ago, they used the NREMT as their state test (in other words, there was no Florida state test---it was the NREMT).

Now I live in Virginia. When I moved here, I applied for reciprocity based on the fact that I had a current NREMT. They gave me a 1 yr Virginia EMT certification so I could begin volunteering (I don't do EMS as a career).

During that year, I was required to take a 40-hour Virginia refresher course (even though I had just take the NREMT less than a year prior--I took it in May & moved to Virgnia in January) & then take the Virginia state exam (w/practicals) in order to get my 4 yr certification. The Virginia exam was incredibly easy (so was NREMT, in my opinion), but I'm unsure what the exact benefit of having the NREMT was if I was still required to test for Virginia. Maybe Virginia is just a pain in the butt (yes, I'll agree). I'm unsure how other states handle this..

I'm glad I have NREMT, personally, b/c not many people in my agency have it & it's looked upon quite favorably (but I think that's because in Virginia you'd have to go the extra mile to take NREMT---in other words, you wouldn't "have" to take it as I did in Florida)...

I guess true reciprocity to me means, if you have NREMT & you're in a state that accepts it, you should be able to apply for that state's certification without taking their state exam or a course.
 

medicdan

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
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From what I understand (I am in a simular position, I finished my basic course yesterday, and am taking the state in July), if you want to work in MA, you need an MA card, if you want to work anywhere else, get the registry. If you compare costs, the MA exam is approx. $350 (150- state pracitcal, 150- practical site, 50- written), and the NREMT is $36.
Again, speaking from what I understand (not personal expierence), the NREMT is easier then the MA exam, so if you can pass the MA, you can pass the NREMT.
They may be a pain, but it seems they they are a nessecary evil.

Good Luck!!
 

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