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Mercy Air Protocols

Discussion in 'HEMS and Air Medical Transport' started by CTMD, May 23, 2018.

  1. CTMD

    CTMD Forum Crew Member

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    I'm curious as to how Mercy Air's protocols work throughout the US, specifically in Southern California/Southern Arizona. Are there corporate wide protocols that are followed or is it like ground EMS where each region has a unique set of protocols established by their individual medical directors?
    I've heard that the scope is extremely restrictive in CA for flight medics but opens up dramatically once you cross the state line and head to AZ, OR, Etc. Is anyone able to shed some light on this and eleborate on what the protocols are like for Mercy Air? (For medics)
    Also, is there a difference in protocols between companies like REACH or Mercy? Or is it all pretty uniform for the region?
     
  2. DesertMedic66

    DesertMedic66 Forum Troll

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    In CA the scope is all determined based on state and county protocols. So medics are not able to do surgical crics, chest tubes, pediatric ET, or admin a huge list of medications. The flight nurse is however able to preform all those skills.

    If you jump over to AZ from what I have heard the RN and medic can operate as equals.
     
    CTMD likes this.
  3. VentMonkey

    VentMonkey calpuleque Premium Member

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    It really is state-dependent. And before another nauseating Texas hijack occurs here, the CC environment is completely not about skills performed. It is about the education behind the skills performed.

    You may end up as equals in another state yet find yourself doing the same amount of hands-on skills as the state you’d left. It is thee educational standards that sets the CC provider and world apart from the base-level knowledge.

    IMO, Air Methods does a phenomenal job with educating their med crews, and EBM. I quite literally learned how to do all of those “cool skills” in an 8-hour cadaver lab (e.g., chest tubes, pericardiocentisis, surgical cric, etc.).

    Am I an expert in all of them? Absolutely not, but the hands on practice coupled more so with the insight as to why they’re performed, and any proper techniques/ considerations vs. deleterious effects seems so much more applicable to the HEMS/ CC environment.

    Also, FWIW, Mercy Air is merely a California/ Nevada Air Methods CBS faction. They have several “Mercy Air-type” CBS’ in AZ alone. Tri-State CareFlite and Native Air being the two prominent programs in AZ, respectively.

    Incidentally, in talking to a former Tri-State nurse a few years ago she absolutely had nothing but good things to say about the volume and experience out of their Bullhead City base.
     
  4. CANMAN

    CANMAN Forum Asst. Chief

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    That sounds just absolutely awful. Makes me wonder why anyone would want to work in HEMS as a medic there.
     
  5. CTMD

    CTMD Forum Crew Member

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    I know that after being hired at Mercy they send you to Colorado for training and orientation; is this similar to getting hired at their other subsidiaries? I know at the orientation they would cover company operations and the what not but do they also cover the advanced medical topics/procedures?

    So are there not a set of written protocols that flight crews operate off of? I'm curious as to how calls actually run while in the air as all I know is the 5-10 minutes of what happens while on the ground.

    Are there frequent skills labs to keep up proficiency in the more advanced skills?

    Also, how is the transition going from ground to flight in terms of the IFT aspect? That is in terms of learning all the new medications and procedures that are commonplace in CC/HEMS. Are these also taught in orientation or are you expected to already have sufficient knowledge of them prior to hire?

    Anyone have any other info on Tri-State, CareFlite or Native Air? I'm particularly interested in the Yuma region and am trying to find out more about the HEMS down there.
     
  6. RocketMedic

    RocketMedic Fancy Book Learnin'

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    For the ground CCT team (Kangaroo Crew) here in Houston, the difference looks to be focus. All they train for, do and prep for is sick/injured kids. And they're really good at it.
     
  7. VentMonkey

    VentMonkey calpuleque Premium Member

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    I finally got my hands on Air Methods’ PCG’s. They’re not to be taken lightly (pun intended).

    My old partner did a work over at my base and brought them with her. Along with all of the material required to be completed before her “third rider” time is completed.

    Let’s just say none of it is to be taken lightly. And that is no joke. I am sure @VFlutter can attest.
     
  8. VFlutter

    VFlutter Flight Nurse

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    Ya orientation can be brutal. Ton of stuff to get done and learn. The new PCGs are pretty legit. Push dose pressors, ARDS.net vent settings, more liberal Ketamine usage, etc.
     

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