London Ambulance Service recruiting 250 medics from overseas

ExpatMedic0

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dutemplar

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Aye, regrettably they seem hot for Australian/ New Zealand with matchin style degrees. That would be "game on" in a heartbeat!
 
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ExpatMedic0

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from my understanding, if your NREMT and have work experience, you can get HCPC in the UK. The issue is getting a work visa, which is not normally allowed for paramedics. Until now that is....
 
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dutemplar

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One way to find out! I just dropped them an email asking about US recruiting and qualifications. I will, of course, post their reply.

I so very want out of for-profit in the DC/Baltimore area. London does sound refreshing, and a lot better scotch supply than the sandbox. Fiancée travel, no problem.
 

dutemplar

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Their reply

d Morning David

Thank you for your e-mail. In order to apply for Paramedic position, first you
will need to check that the qualifications you currently have are valid for our
organisation. Therefore you will need to contact Health and Care Professionals Council http://www.hpc-uk.org/apply/international/.

If your qualifications are valid and compatible to ours, you would then be able to apply to the London Ambulance Service to work as a registered paramedic. The current advert is closing on 14 Mar 2014 but we will continue recruiting throughout this year. More information regarding international candidates is coming soon thus please keep an eye on our website.

Please visit the London Ambulance Service website www.londonambulance.nhs.uk and www.jobs.nhs.uk regularly to view and apply for vacancies that interest you. You may also create an account on NHS Jobs and set up e-mail job alerts to keep up with the latest vacancies from our Service.

Thank you for your interest shown in working for the London Ambulance Service.

Kind Regards

Michelle Small

Michelle Small
Recruitment Administrator

HR Directorate | London Ambulance Service NHS Trust |Recruitment Centre |Units 1
& 2 |Datapoint Business Centre |6 South Crescent |London|E16 4TL |
Tel: 02030690255 (internal: 130263) |Fax: 020 3069 0266

W: http://www.londonambulance.nhs.uk
P Please consider the environment before printing this email.
 

Handsome Robb

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Hmmmmmmm
 

Jon

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ExpatMedic0

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I can't say for sure, as I am not an expert on the HCPC, but from my understanding a degree is not always required, furthermore "recognition of prior learning" aka work experience, often counts towards some of the UK degree programs I have seen to bridge diploma providers(which still exist everywhere in the UK). I spoke to a UK paramedic the other day who holds HCPC and NREMT which is where I am getting my information from.

The standards link is here: http://www.hcpc-uk.org/publications/standards/index.asp?id=48
20 page document. Doesn't seem really difficult. There's the issue of a college degree, though.
 
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TransportJockey

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I must say, the idea of working as a London medic is very appealing
 

MaverickMedic

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Hi All,

Found this post today an thought I would join the forum in case I can help anyone.

I have worked for the LAS for some time. I'm a registered paramedic in the UK (I'm british and I trained here).

If you have questions about either the LAS or being a UK paramedic in general, please feel free to ask.

Someone has already posted a link to the HCPC (the paramedic regulator in the UK) website. You might also find the College of Paramedics useful. They are the professional body for paramedics in the UK and have some information about training and education standards (although that mainly applies to new registrants). I can't post a link, but Google should help.
 

WTEngel

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Wow! That's really great that we have someone from LAS! Welcome...

I have a few questions.

Why is there such a push for international recruitment right now? Why are there not enough UK nationals eligible or applying?

As far as training, there are not that many 4 year degree programs specifically for paramedicine here in the US. Is NREMT-P along with a bachelor's degree (4 years) in biology or other related science enough to suffice?

Anyway, I don't really know why I am asking, other than morbid curiosity. There's no way I could do it right now...but it is always nice to have options...

Oh and one other thing! How do you get to be one of the medics on the BMW motorcycles? That might just be the selling point for me! :D
 

dutemplar

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Agreed WT,
I have about 70 credits towards a degree, NREMTP plus CCEMTP and a whole host of other letters, but...

From what I see,
We spend $700 to apply for the license. Of we get it, then apply for the job. If accepted, we then pay to fly over, rent an apartment, move, aaaaand this isn't seeming very cost effective up front. I didn't get into EMS for
riches, but at 43 need to consider squirreling away for retirement... Sounds like a grand adventure if I was 20 years younger and could front a few grand.

If I'm wrong, let me know... I'd apply next payday
for the license!
 
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ExpatMedic0

ExpatMedic0

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haha, I think LAS recruitment found out this was happening the same time as we did. Here is the email I got from them a few days ago

"Thank you for your email, this is correct regarding International applicants, however, we are still waiting updates on this recruitment. An HCPC certificate would confirm your qualifications are transferable, but visit our website www.londonambulance.nhs.uk for updates as to what you would need to do.

Apologies if this is a vague reply, but we know very little about the process right now.

Thank you for your interest in the London ambulance service"
 
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ExpatMedic0

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Hi All,

Found this post today an thought I would join the forum in case I can help anyone.

I have worked for the LAS for some time. I'm a registered paramedic in the UK (I'm british and I trained here).

If you have questions about either the LAS or being a UK paramedic in general, please feel free to ask.

Hey Maverick,
Thanks a lot for taking the time to come on here and try to answer some questions. Do you guys have any Americans in your system at the moment? Any idea how our national body (NREMT) and your national body (HCPC) conduct an international reciprocity, and if we are required to have a bachelors degree to work for LAS? Many paramedics in the USA only hold a diploma or an associates degree, although a small number of us do have a bachelors.
 
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dutemplar

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Apologies if this is a vague reply, but we know very little about the process right now.

This looks a lot like they were visited by the Good Idea Fairy...
 

MaverickMedic

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Wow! That's really great that we have someone from LAS! Welcome...
Thanks!

Why is there such a push for international recruitment right now? Why are there not enough UK nationals eligible or applying?
To be honest, I'm not sure why it has happened now. LAS has always seemed to me to have a high turn-over of staff. It has links to more universities than other trust, so we get quite a few people train with us, stay a few years then move on.

It could also be a knock-on effect of increasing the education for paramedics. My own view is that we have introduced degrees for paramedics (which is a very good thing in my opinion), but the career and jobs available have not kept up. Lots of graduates stay for a while, then realise that the job doesn't really match up to their expectations. This is changing, slowly. Many trusts now have more senior roles for paramedics which increase responsibility, but it is too early to tell if this is helping with staff retention.

We have got a fairly new chief executive, so that might have something to do with it too.

As far as training, there are not that many 4 year degree programs specifically for paramedicine here in the US. Is NREMT-P along with a bachelor's degree (4 years) in biology or other related science enough to suffice?
I wouldn't expect a degree to be a requirement. The key thing would be getting HCPC registration. Once you have that, you're legally a paramedic. The only way I could see a degree being important would be selecting between applicants, and then I expect any relevant degree would help.
Oh and one other thing! How do you get to be one of the medics on the BMW motorcycles? That might just be the selling point for me! :D
You have to have been in the service for a while, and have considerable riding experience. You then have to wait for a opening (can't remember the last time one was advertised). You then get sent on an advanced riding course with the police motorcyclists. I agree, it would be an awesome job; but I never learned to ride a motorbike.

Do you guys have any Americans in your system at the moment?
Not that I know of. Well, not that trained in America.
Any idea how our national body (NREMT) and your national body (HCPC) conduct an international reciprocity
I don't know the details, but in general they would compare the training and experience that you have against the standards for paramedics in the UK. They are published on their website (I'll post a link when I have enough posts!) I don't know exactly how they work out the equivalence of training, but they ask for as much detail as you can give, so I assume they take experience into account. If anyone is actually going to try it, I would suggest getting the standards and giving an example of how you meet each one. Might take some work, but probably gives the best chance.
 

MaverickMedic

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Hey Maverick,
and if we are required to have a bachelors degree to work for LAS? Many paramedics in the USA only hold a diploma or an associates degree, although a small number of us do have a bachelors.

At the moment, the minimum requirement is for a certificate of higher education, which is essentially one year at university. Most people, however, have a DipHE or foundation degree (equivalent to an associates degree). This will become the minimum as of next year.

The College of Paramedics have recommended that from 2019 new registrants will require a bachelors degree. I expect that recommendation will be adopted, but that isn't official yet.

I don't know what impact this would have on international registrants, as I believe they consider experience as well as basic training.
 

Handsome Robb

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Why does this have to happen when I'm broken and probably going to need surgery?

I'd be out of here in a heartbeat to go to the UK or AUS or NZ to work on the ambulance.
 
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Scott33

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As someone who has a reasonable grasp of the both the US and UK systems…a few points.

1. One of the main differences between UK and US EMS is that of clinical autonomy. UK paramedics do not operate under a doctor's credentials. They have no medical control. Period. Each UK paramedic works under his / her own license and as such, is completely responsible for the patient(s) in their care. As you can imagine, this can be a good or a bad thing. In many cases, they are responsible for the purchase and storage of controlled drugs - on or off the clock. The Australian and NZ (as well as many other) systems mirror the UK in that they operate under their own license.

2. Each foreign applicant will still be required to register with the HCPC prior to commencing employment. As mentioned, each application will be judged on an individual basis and you will either check all the required boxes, or you won't. You have the right to appeal the decision and the right to re-apply (for an additional $700). I don't believe the LAS will, or indeed can, assist with this part of the process.

3. Most paramedic schools in the UK are indeed diploma / degree-based. However, currently neither are required in order to register with the HCPC. The Scottish ambulance service for example, is still using a more traditional modular in-house method to train its paramedics, though I believe there are uni credits awarded. It's no secret that it is only a matter of time before the whole UK requires at least a diploma for practice.

4. Alternative care pathways / treat and release / treat and refer etc is the norm in many UK systems. One of the aces up their sleeves IMO. They really can leave a lot of people at home if they so chose (again, 'they'). Non-conveyance figures of >50% are not unheard of and given that there is no such thing as medical billing, turning the wheels makes no odds financially.

5. Same :censored::censored::censored::censored: different continent. You will still get your drunks, fakers, and BS jobs. It should also be known that assault on UK NHS staff is particularly common.

The deal-breaker for US paras to work in a foreign country was always going to be the visa. Now that this is not an issue in this particular situation, I can only wish whomever choses to apply for it the very best of luck.
 
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For paramedic staffing on the ambulance in LAS, is it double paramedic units, or 1 EMT and 1 Paramedic?
 
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