How do I ask for job details, what is acceptable, etc?

DragonClaw

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I was poking around at potential future employment, I was kind of thinking MedStar out of Dallas.

But, pay isn't listed. So if I decide to pursue this, at what point should that be discussed? Call them up and straight up ask, or submit an application and then when we get to the part of salary (Assuming I get that far), address it then?

I don't want to waste anyone's time. And maybe I'm not in a position to argue pay, with no experience, but what are your thoughts?

Also, supply and demand. EMTs are in demand and (I think, correct me if I'm wrong), women moreso for when a pt is a female who doesn't feel comfortable with men (Which I hear isn't too uncommon, especially with assault and such).

Supposing that's true, is it wrong to expect higher pay merely because of that?

I can be nervous in interviews, what are some good things to do and what are bad things to avoid?

Thanks in advance.
 

rescue1

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I don't think it would be way off base to call and ask for the pay scale, as long as you don't make a big deal about it.

You're not going to get paid more for being female. In the vast majority of systems, EMS agencies are not going to send another unit to accommodate someone's gender preference. I've seen it happen exactly once in 7 years, for a rape victim during a very slow nightshift.

Unfortunately, EMTs are relatively low skilled workers, and you have minimal negotiating power for wages. Good programs like MedStar often have more applicants than they have spots, and have no incentive to negotiate with you, since they can just hire someone else who will accept a lower wage.
 

DragonClaw

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I don't think it would be way off base to call and ask for the pay scale, as long as you don't make a big deal about it.

You're not going to get paid more for being female. In the vast majority of systems, EMS agencies are not going to send another unit to accommodate someone's gender preference. I've seen it happen exactly once in 7 years, for a rape victim during a very slow nightshift.

Unfortunately, EMTs are relatively low skilled workers, and you have minimal negotiating power for wages. Good programs like MedStar often have more applicants than they have spots, and have no incentive to negotiate with you, since they can just hire someone else who will accept a lower wage.
Hmm. Harsh realities are harsh. Thanks for the head's up.
 

mgr22

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Things that are good to do for interviews:
- Be early.
- Wear neat, clean business apparel.
- Bathe.
- Research the prospective employer and come with a couple of questions that show you've done that research.
- Project sanity and dependability.
- Bring your resume if you have one.

Things that are bad to do at interviews:
- Criticize anyone.
- Answer questions that aren't asked.
- Ask about vacations, sick days, drug testing or special accommodations.
- Ask about wages before anything else.
- Tell war stories.
- Lie.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
202
9
18
Things that are good to do for interviews:
- Be early.
- Wear neat, clean business apparel.
- Bathe.
- Research the prospective employer and come with a couple of questions that show you've done that research.
- Project sanity and dependability.
- Bring your resume if you have one.

Things that are bad to do at interviews:
- Criticize anyone.
- Answer questions that aren't asked.
- Ask about vacations, sick days, drug testing or special accommodations.
- Ask about wages before anything else.
- Tell war stories.
- Lie.
As far as resumes go, I've basically worked minimum wage jobs at Walmart, fast food etc. I now work as a low level manager at a call center (after being promoted for being a star performer), I crunch numbers on excel and such.

Is that worth putting in a full resume (I don't really have a resume).

What kind of employer related questions? (Excuse my density, current employers will hire anyone that's partly warm as long as rigor mortis hasn't set in) Like "You've been in Dallas X years, right?" Or something?
 

rescue1

Forum Asst. Chief
579
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As far as resumes go, I've basically worked minimum wage jobs at Walmart, fast food etc. I now work as a low level manager at a call center (after being promoted for being a star performer), I crunch numbers on excel and such.

Is that worth putting in a full resume (I don't really have a resume).

What kind of employer related questions? (Excuse my density, current employers will hire anyone that's partly warm as long as rigor mortis hasn't set in) Like "You've been in Dallas X years, right?" Or something?
Yes, I'd put all of that in a resume. Google a guide on how to make a good resume (1 page, no spelling mistakes, etc).

Employer related questions are things like:
-How many calls do you run per shift/year/whatever?
-Does the fire department respond to calls with us? Are they ALS? Who has scene control?
-Do you do 911 only or transports as well?
-Do you have dedicated day/night shifts or do you rotate?
-What are your protocols like?

Some of these questions might be ones you can find online too.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
202
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Yes, I'd put all of that in a resume. Google a guide on how to make a good resume (1 page, no spelling mistakes, etc).

Employer related questions are things like:
-How many calls do you run per shift/year/whatever?
-Does the fire department respond to calls with us? Are they ALS? Who has scene control?
-Do you do 911 only or transports as well?
-Do you have dedicated day/night shifts or do you rotate?
-What are your protocols like?

Some of these questions might be ones you can find online too.
Oh, I see what you mean. Yes, good questions like that.

Yes, I'll take this advice and look into them.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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I was poking around at potential future employment, I was kind of thinking MedStar out of Dallas.
in that case the first thing I would do is check out http://www.medstar911.org/ http://www.medstar911.org/Websites/medstar911/images/MedStar Recruit Video New SLR.mp4 and http://www.medstar911.org/about-us
But, pay isn't listed. So if I decide to pursue this, at what point should that be discussed? Call them up and straight up ask, or submit an application and then when we get to the part of salary (Assuming I get that far), address it then?

I don't want to waste anyone's time. And maybe I'm not in a position to argue pay, with no experience, but what are your thoughts?
When I started, I never asked pay. TBH, I didn't know what my payrate was until I got my first paystub. the one time I did, because I didn't want to take a pay cut, I told my prospective employer what I made at my last job (11.25/hr) and he said "we'll pay you $9 an hour" and because I was in a jam, I had to accept it. If I had to do it all again, I would call up the company, and speak to HR and find out the lowest starting salary, and ask how they calculated it. I like knowing what I'm getting myself into, but I also know that if the job doesn't pay enough, than it isn't worth my time to apply.
Also, supply and demand. EMTs are in demand and (I think, correct me if I'm wrong), women moreso for when a pt is a female who doesn't feel comfortable with men (Which I hear isn't too uncommon, especially with assault and such).

Supposing that's true, is it wrong to expect higher pay merely because of that?
sounds like it would be gender discrimination to pay a man more than a woman to do the job simply because of the location of their reproductive organs.... wouldn't you think it would be wrong to do the reverse? There are 10 applicants for every 1 position (sometimes 25:1); the balance of power is in your employers hands, as is most of the negotiating power.
As far as resumes go, I've basically worked minimum wage jobs at Walmart, fast food etc. I now work as a low level manager at a call center (after being promoted for being a star performer), I crunch numbers on excel and such.

Is that worth putting in a full resume (I don't really have a resume).
create a resume. use google to find a good template. put your work experience on it; supervisory experience is even better.

You want some advice? don't put all your eggs in one basket, realize that every no leads you only one step closer to someone saying yes, and everyone started out as new at one time. Dress professionally for your initial interview, properly groomed, dress shoes, etc.

And come prepared. Review the company website, know who the CEO is, know what they do. If it's publicly available information, review it. I can tell you medstar covers 436 sq miles in Tarrant County and has a fleet of 65 ambulances that handle 145,000 calls a year. They have been around since 1986 (as the system responsible for ensuring EMS coverage), and in 2005, stopped contracting out their services and started their own internal EMS agency, which now handles all calls. They use DRM, so you are likely posted in your truck for the bulk of your shift.

Don't ask questions that you can find through some easy research, such as by checking out their website, because it will make you appear to be unprepared. Ask questions that show you have done your research, but weren't able to find those answers.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
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in that case the first thing I would do is check out http://www.medstar911.org/ http://www.medstar911.org/Websites/medstar911/images/MedStar Recruit Video New SLR.mp4 and http://www.medstar911.org/about-us When I started, I never asked pay. TBH, I didn't know what my payrate was until I got my first paystub. the one time I did, because I didn't want to take a pay cut, I told my prospective employer what I made at my last job (11.25/hr) and he said "we'll pay you $9 an hour" and because I was in a jam, I had to accept it. If I had to do it all again, I would call up the company, and speak to HR and find out the lowest starting salary, and ask how they calculated it. I like knowing what I'm getting myself into, but I also know that if the job doesn't pay enough, than it isn't worth my time to apply.sounds like it would be gender discrimination to pay a man more than a woman to do the job simply because of the location of their reproductive organs.... wouldn't you think it would be wrong to do the reverse? There are 10 applicants for every 1 position (sometimes 25:1); the balance of power is in your employers hands, as is most of the negotiating power.
create a resume. use google to find a good template. put your work experience on it; supervisory experience is even better.

You want some advice? don't put all your eggs in one basket, realize that every no leads you only one step closer to someone saying yes, and everyone started out as new at one time. Dress professionally for your initial interview, properly groomed, dress shoes, etc.

And come prepared. Review the company website, know who the CEO is, know what they do. If it's publicly available information, review it. I can tell you medstar covers 436 sq miles in Tarrant County and has a fleet of 65 ambulances that handle 145,000 calls a year. They have been around since 1986 (as the system responsible for ensuring EMS coverage), and in 2005, stopped contracting out their services and started their own internal EMS agency, which now handles all calls. They use DRM, so you are likely posted in your truck for the bulk of your shift.

Don't ask questions that you can find through some easy research, such as by checking out their website, because it will make you appear to be unprepared. Ask questions that show you have done your research, but weren't able to find those answers.
Honestly, I don't find an issue in the reverse. If there's a demand for more men in a certain field and they get paid more, what's the problem?

And in my mind it's not quite "Doing the same job" if it's some woman to woman thing, because a man can't do that? I see your point though, and how it looks sexist. But, there are tons of things one side can do the other can't, and that's okay. And I think it's okay to get paid more if that's something advantageous and beneficial to the company. Men are naturally stronger, so if you are trying to hire stronger people, you may want to look for a man.

Nothing personal on either side. Just what I see.

Edit: I also don't mean just paying more "just because of where ones organs are located" (and I think a business should be free to do si with their money), but if there's a demand for women in EMS, you would have to be more competitive to attract or keep them. Like tall people in basketball or something.
 

CCCSD

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There isn’t anything a male can’t do that a female can in EMS. Don’t play the gender card.
 

mgr22

Forum Asst. Chief
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As far as resumes go, I've basically worked minimum wage jobs at Walmart, fast food etc. I now work as a low level manager at a call center (after being promoted for being a star performer), I crunch numbers on excel and such.

Is that worth putting in a full resume (I don't really have a resume).

What kind of employer related questions? (Excuse my density, current employers will hire anyone that's partly warm as long as rigor mortis hasn't set in) Like "You've been in Dallas X years, right?" Or something?
The resume issue is tricky. Ideally, a resume helps you get hired, but if you have nothing of interest to put on a resume, you might be better off skipping it unless you're asked for one. A general rule for job hunting is, accentuate the positives and don't advertise the negatives.

As for questions to ask, it looks like you already got lots of good suggestions.
 

rescue1

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Honestly, I don't find an issue in the reverse. If there's a demand for more men in a certain field and they get paid more, what's the problem?

And in my mind it's not quite "Doing the same job" if it's some woman to woman thing, because a man can't do that? I see your point though, and how it looks sexist. But, there are tons of things one side can do the other can't, and that's okay. And I think it's okay to get paid more if that's something advantageous and beneficial to the company. Men are naturally stronger, so if you are trying to hire stronger people, you may want to look for a man.

Nothing personal on either side. Just what I see.

Edit: I also don't mean just paying more "just because of where ones organs are located" (and I think a business should be free to do si with their money), but if there's a demand for women in EMS, you would have to be more competitive to attract or keep them. Like tall people in basketball or something.
Philosophical issues aside, it is illegal to pay people differently based on their sex for the same job in the US, and has been since 1963. It's therefore best not to bring it up during your interview.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
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There isn’t anything a male can’t do that a female can in EMS. Don’t play the gender card.
Then, I think that simplifies things on both ends. I won't lie, I'd accept higher pay for a lot of reasons. And should it have worked in my favor, I wouldn't be unhappy.

I guess I'm glad though, because it works both ways.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
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Philosophical issues aside, it is illegal to pay people differently based on their sex for the same job in the US, and has been since 1963. It's therefore best not to bring it up during your interview.
I don't think I was going to bring it up, just wondered how much a factor it really is and if it would do me any good. But, thanks for that.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
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4484


I was looking around at job stuff. Does this mean people are being criminal? I wonder if more men could be employed at places that pay more vs more or less equal distribution at places.

Not to turn this into a pay slugfest, I guess it's just got me thinking. And this graph does not support my reasoning, if anything I'd be paid less?
 

CCCSD

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Tell you what. Go to an interview, point out you’re female, demand a higher pay rate because, you know, female things.

Then enjoy punching numbers into a computer for the rest of your life. It’s obvious you are bound and determined to make this non-issue an issue. You are a brand new EMT with zero experience, and are already trying to game the system.

Not a bright start.
 

rescue1

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Oh boy haha.

So, according to the Equal Pay Act of 1963, it's illegal to pay people differently based on sex for the same job. However, this has nothing to do with promotions, seniority, etc. Therefore, if you have a man with 10 years on the job and a woman with 5, you can pay the man more (or vise versa, if the roles are flipped). Similarly, if the man is promoted, he can be paid more.

Since the passing of the Act, the gender pay gap has narrowed from women being paid about 60% of what men make to somewhere in the 80% range. People will debate the reasons why--you might remember this kind of thing being in the news recently. Some people claim it's because men are more likely to be viewed as confident and assertive (while confident women are viewed as "*****y") and therefore get promoted over women, or because the people in charge of companies and agencies tend to be old dudes who may still be a little sexist and favor men for promotions and hiring, consciously or unconsciously. Others say it's because women are more likely to work part time and take leaves of absence to raise kids/have a family and therefore miss out on the opportunities for advancement that they would have had if they continued to work full time.

Regardless, it's not something to worry about with an entry level EMS job. 99% of the time the service is going to tell you a number, the same number they give every entry level EMT, and you can take it or leave it.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
202
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Tell you what. Go to an interview, point out you’re female, demand a higher pay rate because, you know, female things.

Then enjoy punching numbers into a computer for the rest of your life. It’s obvious you are bound and determined to make this non-issue an issue. You are a brand new EMT with zero experience, and are already trying to game the system.

Not a bright start.
I'm not disagreeing with what you've said. I just had an idea and I think it's not a very good one now, but it left me with questions.
 

DragonClaw

Forum Lieutenant
202
9
18
Oh boy haha.

So, according to the Equal Pay Act of 1963, it's illegal to pay people differently based on sex for the same job. However, this has nothing to do with promotions, seniority, etc. Therefore, if you have a man with 10 years on the job and a woman with 5, you can pay the man more (or vise versa, if the roles are flipped). Similarly, if the man is promoted, he can be paid more.

Since the passing of the Act, the gender pay gap has narrowed from women being paid about 60% of what men make to somewhere in the 80% range. People will debate the reasons why--you might remember this kind of thing being in the news recently. Some people claim it's because men are more likely to be viewed as confident and assertive (while confident women are viewed as "*****y") and therefore get promoted over women, or because the people in charge of companies and agencies tend to be old dudes who may still be a little sexist and favor men for promotions and hiring, consciously or unconsciously. Others say it's because women are more likely to work part time and take leaves of absence to raise kids/have a family and therefore miss out on the opportunities for advancement that they would have had if they continued to work full time.

Regardless, it's not something to worry about with an entry level EMS job. 99% of the time the service is going to tell you a number, the same number they give every entry level EMT, and you can take it or leave it.
Hmm, alright. I figured there are more variables than I could think of, these are good points.

I think it's becoming increasingly common for men to stay at home, wonder how this will affect pay scales in the next few decades.

I'd have to think about what is fair, afteral moving to a bigger city is more costly. I don't think I could afford a pay cut if they're not at least matching my pay.
 

CCCSD

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You seem to think you are worth more than the others applying for a job. They won’t match your pay. They will pay you THEIR pay rate. EMTs are a dime a dozen, and there are too many out there now.

Would you enlist in the military and demand they pay you $60k a year because you feel that’s your worth?

BTW, men aren’t sitting at home pondering this.
 
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