EMT-B wanting to become an instructor

Mrs. G

Forum Probie
18
0
0
Hello.. I am an EMT-B and CNA but I wanted to become an EMT instructor or even an instructor in CPR.

Does anyone know where I can go from here with my education basically my next step to become an instructor. I am sure there are other classes I would have to take to become a certified instructor.


I am in Chicago Illinois.

Thanks!!
 

usafmedic45

Forum Deputy Chief
3,796
5
0
Several years of experience is the next step for an EMS instructor. Also, normally EMT-B courses are taught by paramedics in most areas so advancing your education will also help.
 

Mrs. G

Forum Probie
18
0
0
Thank you for the reply and information you gave. Experience is really the key here I see.
 

medicdan

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
2,488
13
38
I'm with usfa here... but as a basic the single best thing you can do is become a CPR instructor, and I reccommend AHA credentials. Become active teaching-- not just HCP CPR, but also lay responders, first aid, etc. Affiliate yourself with an EMT program and help out with labs, grading exams, etc.

Good Luck!


Sent from my DROID2 using Tapatalk
 

TxParamedic

Forum Crew Member
34
0
0
I agree that you should rack up some time before you start teaching but here in Tx you can teach up to your patch level if you are a state instuctor. Tx recognises the naemse instructor course. www.naemse.org is a good place to start if you are thinking about EMS education.
 

LucidResq

Forum Deputy Chief
2,031
3
0
I agree with increasing your education and experience, but I know several programs out here hire EMTs as assistant instructors to teach skills and such on a PRN basis. You do usually need at least some field experience under your belt, but it would be a good idea to gain some exposure to the teaching side of things and start developing a rapport with a program.
 

Mrs. G

Forum Probie
18
0
0
Thanks everyone.. I appreciate all the replies. I was thinking of taking a Emergency Dispatcher class as well to help with experience with additional education for a job as well.

But I cant seem to find anything near where I live.

So I will think of other courses as well to take to help with becoming an instructor some day. I will look into that web address Txparamedic has given me.

I am actually relocating to TX in 2 years but I was hoping to get as much education that I can here in Chicago.
 

Lifeguards For Life

Forum Deputy Chief
1,448
5
0
Several years of experience is the next step for an EMS instructor. Also, normally EMT-B courses are taught by paramedics in most areas so advancing your education will also help.
I've often wondered if someone with extensive teaching experience could do better than someone with several years of field experience?

This is of course, assuming that the person with teaching experience has sufficient knowledge of the EMT curriculum, or even minimal knowledge of the emt curriculum, but a background in the sciences.
 

Pneumothorax

Forum Lieutenant
192
0
0
I agree with increasing your education and experience, but I know several programs out here hire EMTs as assistant instructors to teach skills and such on a PRN basis. You do usually need at least some field experience under your belt, but it would be a good idea to gain some exposure to the teaching side of things and start developing a rapport with a program.
this is exactly what ive been doing with the program i graduated from...keeps my skills sharp and i love being a part of teaching future EMS providers :)

I've often wondered if someone with extensive teaching experience could do better than someone with several years of field experience?

This is of course, assuming that the person with teaching experience has sufficient knowledge of the EMT curriculum, or even minimal knowledge of the emt curriculum, but a background in the sciences.
i think it should be a balance of the two. i had one nursing instructor that had 23 years of teaching experience and 1 of actual Floor nursing..and she sucked!

i think if you would rather have someone with many years of field experience, they should be good at explaining things and charismatic and able to get the info across which is the most important.
 

LucidResq

Forum Deputy Chief
2,031
3
0
Maybe it's silly but the big difference I've noticed between instructors with and those without experience are the stories. Sometimes there's no better way to illustrate a point than with the true-life crazy stories that you'll never find in a book.
 

Lifeguards For Life

Forum Deputy Chief
1,448
5
0
Maybe it's silly but the big difference I've noticed between instructors with and those without experience are the stories. Sometimes there's no better way to illustrate a point than with the true-life crazy stories that you'll never find in a book.
I would debate the truth in numerous war stories.

Especially after numerous tellings.
 

STXmedic

Forum Burnout
Premium Member
5,018
1,352
113
Maybe it's silly but the big difference I've noticed between instructors with and those without experience are the stories. Sometimes there's no better way to illustrate a point than with the true-life crazy stories that you'll never find in a book.
I actually find war stories a nuisance and distracting. I'm not a fan of instructors who start half their sentences with "This one time..."
 

Lifeguards For Life

Forum Deputy Chief
1,448
5
0
I actually find war stories a nuisance and distracting. I'm not a fan of instructors who start half their sentences with "This one time..."
I think some instructors have a tendency to let war stories replace actual teaching. Especially if the instructor does not understand the science behind what they are trying to teach.
 

abckidsmom

Dances with Patients
3,380
3
36
I actually find war stories a nuisance and distracting. I'm not a fan of instructors who start half their sentences with "This one time..."
A couple of well-chosen stories can be entertaining. Or if you know the students are familiar with a particular incident, and use it to illustrate a point.

I would like to recommend that all EMS instructors have more education than EMT-B. That basic class just doesn't leave you with a lot of background to answer the bigger questions the students toss out there. Even more frustrating than war stories in class are instructors who can't answer the reasonable questions that come up.
 

LucidResq

Forum Deputy Chief
2,031
3
0
I think it depends on how the stories are used. I agree - sometimes stories can be useless and irritating. Mostly if they are presented for the general purpose of stating "one time I ran this sweet call and there was blood everywhere!"

Personally I've appreciated the ones that share the humility and simple worldliness of EMS. I've been fortunate enough to have quality instructors willing to divulge these corners of our field that most ignore.

Of course, I will never forget cautionary tales such as that of the combative 80-something-year-old woman with a med underdose that ripped through Kerlix. Who would be able to?
 

abckidsmom

Dances with Patients
3,380
3
36
I think it depends on how the stories are used. I agree - sometimes stories can be useless and irritating. Mostly if they are presented for the general purpose of stating "one time I ran this sweet call and there was blood everywhere!"

Personally I've appreciated the ones that share the humility and simple worldliness of EMS. I've been fortunate enough to have quality instructors willing to divulge these corners of our field that most ignore.

Of course, I will never forget cautionary tales such as that of the combative 80-something-year-old woman with a med underdose that ripped through Kerlix. Who would be able to?

Blood everywhere? Lame. Im talking about the funny stories, or the ones that illustrate how good detailed interviews and exams can unearth the real story.

Or the ones about the lame reasons people call 911 in the first place.
 

LucidResq

Forum Deputy Chief
2,031
3
0
I think my all-time favorite so far is the 2-year-old that chewed on raw bacon. Not choking on it or anything, "he's crying but I think it's because I took the bacon from him and he wants it back." GIVE THE POOR KID HIS BACON BACK!

First-time moms. *sigh*

I agree, though. There's a fine balance between experience and ability to educate. I stumped some 15-20+ year medics in my EMT class with my questions (and they weren't that crazy), and I think an EMT teaching an EMT class is asinine.
 

STXmedic

Forum Burnout
Premium Member
5,018
1,352
113
and I think an EMT teaching an EMT class is asinine.
Same concept for medic, but paramedics teaching paramedic classes is rampant....
 
Top