Drug dose calculations

RocketMedic

King of the Improbable
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Have you looked at any of the apps already out there?
A few, but they don’t do what my sheet does. PM me and I’ll show you.
 

PBavaro

Forum Ride Along
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Handtevy actually lets you download a demo of their app here. Handtevy is actually tailored to your departments protocols and concentrations carried and can be updated as shortages occur.

Disclosure: I work with Handtevy and someone from this forum pinged me to jump in with access codes.
 

RocketMedic

King of the Improbable
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I really need to turn mine into an app.
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
Community Leader
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I'm one of those guys that actually does "the math" when it comes to calculating doses. I'm OK at dimensional analysis, but I prefer a different method.... That being said, I very much will use apps on my phone, computer, iPad, etc to help me figure out how much of a given med I'm to give unless the math is stupid easy... like if I'm giving 50 mcg of fentanyl and it's a 100 mcg/2 mL vial or if it's 25 mg Benadryl from a 50/1mL vial... Just about the only thing I've memorized for doses is 1000 mg Ceftriaxone IM reconstitution. That's 2.1 mL of 1% Lidocaine and for a 250 mg dose, that's 0.71 mL as the concentration is 350 mg/mL when reconstituted that way.

There's a reason I use 1% lido to reconstitute... It's because I'm not a total a-hole. If I was, I'd just reconstitute with 2.1 mL sterile water instead.
 

akflightmedic

Forum Deputy Chief
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I just withhold....cannot make med math errors if you never give meds to start with.
 

MSDeltaFlt

Forum Deputy Chief
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You don't need anything other than your protocol book and a calculator. The math needed is nothing more complex than high school algebra.

Convert pounds to kilograms then use this for any medication to be given including fluid boluses. Whatever part(s) of the equation you're not calculating for take those integers out of the equation.

pounds/2.2 = kilograms

(dose)(kg)(drop set)/concentration = ml/hr

And to double check your transfer patient is receiving the infusion that they tell you they are receiving is elementary math. Whatever is multiplied by on one side of the "=" is divided by on the other side and vice versa.

(dose) = mL per hour(concentration/(kg)(drop set)

This isn't rocket science. Nor is it brain surgery. It is quite literally that simple.
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
Community Leader
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I always forget I have the PediStat app. If we're headed to any decent peds all, I just use the calculator on my phone to calculate the doses on the way, to include ml. Yes, that requires knowing the concentrations you carry, which you should just do. It's not cheating. Check the ambulance, and know how things come packaged.
 
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