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Crashing airway patient

Discussion in 'Scenarios' started by Rialaigh, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. Chase

    Chase Flight Nurse

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    I have seen a precordial thump work once. The theory is sound, just like commotio cordis. I also like the idea of percussion pacing from the old school anesthesia literature. When I was a floor nurse I had a patient that kept going asystole on me and every time I did a sternal rub/thump his rhythm would pick back up and he would wake up for a few seconds then slow back down. Pretty cool and worked until the crash cart got there.
     
  2. StCEMT

    StCEMT Forum Deputy Chief

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    So when going for the thump...aim for the sternum and hit as hard as you can?
     
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  3. VentMonkey

    VentMonkey Forum Deputy Chief Premium Member

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    :D
     
  4. FireWA1

    FireWA1 Has no idea what I'm doing.

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    I bet you could even call it a "sternal rub" to make it a bls procedure.
     
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  5. StCEMT

    StCEMT Forum Deputy Chief

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    But isn't that how its done on TV? Be all dramatic, shout "DONT YOU DIE ON ME" and then hit them and they magically come back? Hollywood would never lie.
    That's a damn good rub then. :p
     
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  6. VentMonkey

    VentMonkey Forum Deputy Chief Premium Member

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    IMG_0133.JPG
    This is essentially what I was taught in school. Placing your elbow over their navel area should "in theory" generate enough force for it to be effective.

    I would agree with an above post regarding its application in perhaps a commotio cordis situation what with the "R on T phenomenon", etc.

    I am willing to bet on the handful of patients it had success on, they were at that rare part in the cardiac cycle, truly divine intervention.
     

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