Civil traffic infractions (Alameda County, CA EMT-Basic)

average

Forum Ride Along
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Hello,

I'm close to completing an EMT training class and I want to apply for EMT-B certification in Alameda County, CA (after I finish my class and take the NREMT exam). I'm looking at the EMT certification application, http://ems.acgov.org/ems-assets/docs/Certification/emt certification application.pdf and it has a confusing checkbox:

"Are you currently under investigation or have you been arrested and convicted of an infraction, misdemeanor, or felony in California or in any other state or place..."

I have two civil traffic infractions (speeding tickets, both in states other than California) from 2017 (and nothing else). I'm confused about whether I have to check "yes" on this question or not. I was convicted of two infractions, but I was never arrested for anything, since these are civil infractions (both citations were for going 10 miles above the speed limit.) My interpretation is that I should check yes if I was "arrested and convicted of" any offense", but since I was never arrested, I should check "no". Am I understanding that language correctly? It's not even grammatically correct (you get "arrested for" a crime, not "arrested of" a crime), so I'm not sure that I am.

To put the question another way: I don't have a criminal record, but I do have two convictions for infractions. The question is asking about "infractions, misdemeanors, or felonies", so in other words, more than just criminal offenses. However, it sounds like you don't have to report anything that you weren't arrested for and aren't currently being investigated for. Correct?

Please note, I'm aware that different ambulance companies have different rules about driving records, and I'm not asking about that -- only about the certification application itself.

Thanks!
 

Aprz

Forum Deputy Chief
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I think you should be fine checking no. Usually there is a phone number or e-mail that you can use to contact the EMS agency if you really wang a definitive answer, but I am pretty sure no will ne okay.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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were you arrested? did they put the silver bracelets on you? Traffic violations are typically different than a criminal violation.

However, you can probably contact the Alameda County EMS agency to be sure.
 

CCCSD

Forum Lieutenant
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Being handcuffed is not a requirement for an arrest. Just so everyone understands.
 

average

Forum Ride Along
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Thanks, that puts my mind and ease! And no, as I said in my original post, "I was never arrested". (The only time I've had the silver bracelets put on me was in a consensual bedroom situation.)
 

luke_31

Forum Asst. Chief
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Thanks, that puts my mind and ease! And no, as I said in my original post, "I was never arrested". (The only time I've had the silver bracelets put on me was in a consensual bedroom situation.)
Wait....what. TMI buddy
 

chrls

Forum Crew Member
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As the the forums California Police Officer, you’d be correct checking the Yes box. When stopped and issued a citation/ticket or whatever you’d like to call it, you are in fact being arrested. By signing the ticket you are promising to appear in court or otherwise handle your ticket by paying a fine or community service etc. By promising to handle the matter you are being released at the scene. If you refuse to sign, you’d be taken to jail and taken before a judge at the earliest time available.

Handcuffs and a ride to jail aren’t the qualifiers for an arrest to have occurred.

California has 3 levels of violations. Infractions, misdemeanors, and felonies. It sounds like you have been convicted of 2 infractions.

That all being said, the agency you’re applying for probably doesn’t know this. Call them and ask some clarifying questions.
 

average

Forum Ride Along
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@chrls The US Supreme Court disagrees with you: "A routine traffic stop is more like a brief stop under Terry v. Ohio, 392 U. S. 1, than an arrest, see, e.g., Arizona v. Johnson, 555 U. S. 323, 330." (Rodriguez v. United States, 2015 - https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/14pdf/13-9972_p8k0.pdf )

@luke_31 Since I said in my original post that I had never been arrested, when @DrParasite asked "did they put the silver bracelets on you?", I assume they really meant to ask that question rather than asking whether I'd been arrested (since why would someone ask a question that was already answered in the OP?) And I have to give an honest answer to an honest question.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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@average you can listen to everyone on here, whose opinions might be different than that of alameda county EMS, or you can call Alameda County EMS and get the answer you need. We might all be wrong, or our opinions might be different than theirs: bottom long pick up the phone and call, instead of listening to the opinions of a bunch of random people on the internet, whose thinking may be completely different than what your prospective employer expects.
 

medichopeful

Flight nurse, ground paramedic
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You would know if you were arrested, which it doesn't sound like you were. They want to know about criminal issues, not speeding tickets for going 10 miles over the speed limit. Answer "no."
 

chrls

Forum Crew Member
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@chrls The US Supreme Court disagrees with you: "A routine traffic stop is more like a brief stop under Terry v. Ohio, 392 U. S. 1, than an arrest, see, e.g., Arizona v. Johnson, 555 U. S. 323, 330." (Rodriguez v. United States, 2015 - https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/14pdf/13-9972_p8k0.pdf )

@luke_31 Since I said in my original post that I had never been arrested, when @DrParasite asked "did they put the silver bracelets on you?", I assume they really meant to ask that question rather than asking whether I'd been arrested (since why would someone ask a question that was already answered in the OP?) And I have to give an honest answer to an honest question.
Thanks, but a traffic stop and being issued a citation are different things. It’s technically a detention until the ticket is written.

A ticket doesn’t have to be for a traffic related violation either. For example, people receive tickets for infraction amounts of controlled substances.

Just trying to give more insight on your question but if you don’t want it that’s fine too.

To repeat myself and echo @DrParasite, call them and ask. We aren’t your prospective employer and don’t know specifically what their form is asking.
 

CALEMT

The Other Guy/ Paramaybe?
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@chrls The US Supreme Court disagrees with you: "A routine traffic stop is more like a brief stop under Terry v. Ohio, 392 U. S. 1, than an arrest, see, e.g., Arizona v. Johnson, 555 U. S. 323, 330." (Rodriguez v. United States, 2015 - https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/14pdf/13-9972_p8k0.pdf )
So you want to argue with the one person on this forum that can give you a 100% ligament answer to CA traffic laws? Yeah thats smart.
 
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