Anything could of done differently with this call?

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
5,585
1,629
113
In fact, I get called by non-procedural/ED/ICU/PACU RNs in the hospital frequently as they don't feel comfortable giving whatever IV opioid and will go push it myself.
Wait a second... so you, an ambulance paramedic, are frequently called into the hospital to the ER (where emergencies are treated), to the ICU (where the sickest of the sick are treated), and the PACU (where patients are monitored following the administration of anesthesia), none of which are new grad departments, where there are doctors who are giving orders to administer opioids, and the nurses there aren't comfortable pushing a drug... so instead of calling another nurse, or another department, they call a person from the ambulance to push the drug and then leave?

meme-kid-confused.png


This is an actual hospital, you are referring to, not a local doc in the box, or building that has 4 beds, a nurse and a PA with a doc on call right? because I would like to know the name, so I can tell my family to avoid this hospital, as if what you are saying is true, I don't think they have the competence to treat anyone.
As someone who gets called by others to treat acute pain I believe that Im not treating pain aggressively enough unless I'm occasionally giving narcan to my patients.
I don't know what to say, other than wow.... Hey @Carlos Danger , you've been doing this for a while... and I'm not experienced enough in this area... do you want providers to frequently give opioids to the level where they occasionally give narcan to their patients? sounds like @silver is calling it his standard, and something he is proud of
 
Last edited:

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
10,205
950
113
Back on the original topic please, or start another thread.
 

Carlos Danger

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
4,280
2,962
113
Wait a second... so you, an ambulance paramedic, are frequently called into the hospital to the ER (where emergencies are treated), to the ICU (where the sickest of the sick are treated), and the PACU (where patients are monitored following the administration of anesthesia), none of which are new grad departments, where there are doctors who are giving orders to administer opioids, and the nurses there aren't comfortable pushing a drug... so instead of calling another nurse, or another department, they call a person from the ambulance to push the drug and then leave?

meme-kid-confused.png


This is an actual hospital, you are referring to, not a local doc in the box, or building that has 4 beds, a nurse and a PA with a doc on call right? because I would like to know the name, so I can tell my family to avoid this hospital, as if what you are saying is true, I don't think they have the competence to treat anyone.

I don't know what to say, other than wow.... Hey @Carlos Danger , you've been doing this for a while... and I'm not experienced enough in this area... do you want providers to frequently give opioids to the level where they occasionally give narcan to their patients? sounds like @silver is calling it his standard, and something he is proud of
Silver is a Physician Anesthesiologist......
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
5,585
1,629
113
Silver is a Physician Anesthesiologist......
Well, that changes my post entirely. it's still disturbing that a nurse doesn't feel comfortable pushing a drug, but that makes a lot more sense that they call anesthesiology vs a paramedic off the street

I would give an anesthesiologist waaaay more leeway on snowing someone to the point of needing narcan vs a paramedic, because of the nature of the patients they deal with. that's a lot different than a fentanyl lollipop, and I still don't think any prehospital providers should be giving enough opioids to warrant narcan on a regular basis.
 

medichopeful

Flight RN/Paramedic
1,860
244
63
Well, that changes my post entirely. it's still disturbing that a nurse doesn't feel comfortable pushing a drug, but that makes a lot more sense that they call anesthesiology vs a paramedic off the street
I believe that Silver is referring to nurses in non-specialty areas.
 

johnrsemt

Forum Deputy Chief
1,444
199
63
Fentanyl Lollipops are given in the field to soldiers who are hurt in combat. They are self correcting, they have a ring on them that goes over the finger with the palm of the hand facing away from the patient and when the patient starts to get too 'snowed' from the Fentanyl it pulls out of their mouth and it eases the dose until the patient wakes up and puts it back in.
They are in 200, 400, and 800mcg doses, with 2 grams of glucose and are given by the combat medic who has treated the injury and goes on to the next patient. It takes time for the Lollipop to dissolve, so it lasts quite awhile; and a friend/coworker who was an 18-D (Special Forces Medic) who gave out over 200 during 1 combat tour never had a soldier OD or stop breathing on them, and he had a couple of medics in the clinic who tried hard to suck one down to get high.
 

Top