Anyone took a break from EMS?

NomadicMedic

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what is SSM?
SSM is system status management. This was developed by Jack Stout as an integral part of his Public Utility Model of Ambulance Service. In a nutshell, SSM is based on the idea that historical data from the past 12 weeks will be predictive of where ambulance calls will happen next. Ambulances are "posted" in these areas, as determined by software and frequently moved as the prediction for service changes.

Also see: sitting in parking lots.
 
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ffemt8978

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SSM is system status management. This was developed by Jack Stout as an integral part of his Public Utility Model of Ambulance Service. In a nutshell, SSM is based on the idea that historical data from there past 12 weeks will be predictive of where ambulance calls will happen next. Ambulances are "posted" in these areas, as determined by software and frequently moved as the prediction for service changes.

Also see: sitting in parking lots.
Sounds about as effective as the predictive policing software that has failed so miserably.
 

SandpitMedic

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If you haven’t taken a break from the ambulance are you even a medic?
 

armydawg

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Glad you were in tune with yourself to recognize you needed a break, also happy to hear you're excited to be back. You post made me think though, if retirement was a real option for the majority of us, how many could take a year break?
 

NomadicMedic

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Glad you were in tune with yourself to recognize you needed a break, also happy to hear you're excited to be back. You post made me think though, if retirement was a real option for the majority of us, how many could take a year break?
most EMS people believe they have no other skills, which is why they stay working at a job they hate.
 

MMiz

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I learned a lot about myself when I took a year-long break from my primary job.

Ended up going back after a year, but it definitely put things in perspective.
 

StCEMT

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Only breaks I've ever been able to take are 1-2 week vacations. I still enjoy learning new things and the work, but I have little to no desire to put out the volume of work I have been doing. Especially not for higher ups that could give a **** less or will try to get you in trouble for dumb, petty ****. No thanks. I wish I could stop for a month or two, but thats what exit plans are for.
 

Woodtownemt

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After 12 years in health care, 7 being on a rig and the last 3 in one of the busiest Er in the nation. I finally had to throw in the towel. Took a pay cut and went on countless interviews taking almost a year to land an office position.

I went years being burnt out but to the point where I just couldn't see it. Everyone else did. Once the partner made it clear she wouldn't be able to take much more and seeing the family around me I got help and did tons of on your own holistics. Stretching, meditating, journaling anything. That worked to a point but I still felt trapped by being limited to this field.

At one point I was so burnt out that I tried to get into a minimum wage plumbing apprentice job but was told I woildnt like it with my work hx. Then the nonstop traumas.The month that we had 5 kids die. The countless violence and endless psychosis that I dealt on a daily basis just was too much. Sure i miss helping people and getting that instant gratification but those days simply didn't come that often.

Now I'm working 9-5 and I realize I don't miss it as much as I thought I would. The other day I was having a moment at work when I realized that i have dealt with life and death for some odd years. I've done cpr on tons of people and had more people die in-front of me than most regular people will ever encounter. So why would the non important office drama get me. "It's not my emergency" the Golden mantra i used back on the rig piped back in my head.

Now i use that experience as a strength that I can handle what a lotof people can not. And even though I didn't turn out to be a lifer the 12 years have taught me very deep and life long lessons with dealing with others and myself. I don't speak of my healthcare history because I'm tired of the usual "worst thing you've seen?" Bit everyone says at one point.Beyond my old Ems/Er shirts I wear on my days off you and old patch on my bag. You wouldnt know what i use to do.

In the end if you feel trapped, don't. What we do is a great way to beef up your resume and interview skills. Employers want someone who can adapt and think on their feet. Someone who can work under stressful situation but still get the job done. All these things we do on the daily. You just have to tweak it to your bio. As far as money. Either way you're gonna have to pay. The pay cut I took did suck and i was lucky that I'm getting by but not really. Though I feel I would have paid a higher price if i didn't leave the field. The fact that I can go to work and not meltdown when the yelling starts to flow is priceless. I'm stressed from money but nowhere near the stress of authentic burnout. So if you are second guessing yourself, don't. The grass is always greener. It's finding the right patch of it that is the tricky part. Stay safe out there.
 

NomadicMedic

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Reading the above made me remember how burnt out I was at my job in broadcasting. I used to sit in my office in Seattle with the door closed and scour the job listings. I was this close to taking a job at SeaTac as a baggage handler. I used to get physically ill before going to work. I got out, became a medic and never should have looked back... Then, Jesus christ... I really screwed up Going back to it was the worst mistake I ever made.

The idea of finding the place where you can make an impact, without the job impacting you, is a sound one.

I make sure I tell all my new EMT students about how easy it is to become a salty burnout. And I remind them that I'll be watching and I'll call them on it when I see it.

Vacations, leave of absence, meditation or yoga... find what keeps you centered and put it into play before you're thinking about ways to end everything.

I wish I knew 20 years ago what I know now. Self care is the most important thing we can do.
 

StCEMT

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Reading the above made me remember how burnt out I was at my job in broadcasting. I used to sit in my office in Seattle with the door closed and scour the job listings. I was this close to taking a job at SeaTac as a baggage handler. I used to get physically ill before going to work. I got out, became a medic and never should have looked back... Then, Jesus christ... I really screwed up Going back to it was the worst mistake I ever made.

The idea of finding the place where you can make an impact, without the job impacting you, is a sound one.

I make sure I tell all my new EMT students about how easy it is to become a salty burnout. And I remind them that I'll be watching and I'll call them on it when I see it.

Vacations, leave of absence, meditation or yoga... find what keeps you centered and put it into play before you're thinking about ways to end everything.

I wish I knew 20 years ago what I know now. Self care is the most important thing we can do.
Unfortunately most of us can't afford a leave of absence. Vacations are good though. Got a few coming up and I can't wait. Got a few much needed hunting trips with an old college buddy. But unfortunately those are few and far between and don't bridge the gap as well as they used to.
 

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