Working In Canada

Amarcord

Forum Probie
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Who is your certifying regulatory body? Who is your licensing body?
There are a number of institutions that will certify you but the JIBC, which I attended, is really the only one worth attending. They have a monopoly on the education for paramedics in BC. After you pass the course they will send your certification to the Emergency Medical Assistants Licensing Board. You can read about it here if you want.

 

FiremanMike

EMS Coordinator
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Was not snarky at all. It was a starter reply to understand your background, so when you inquire about working in a different country, it is easiest to ask the very first qualifier (or disqualifier for most US Medics). And for the record, I do not hate on Fire Medics...I hate on those who actively lobby against better standards, degree entry level, and just about anything extra to put "us" on par with the rest of the world when it comes to Paramedicine, (IAFF really has done us no favors in this regard).
Fair enough..


In regards to Independent Practitioners, you see a lot of community paramedicine (years before we considered it), you see a lot of treatment, no transport (Not AMA kind, but policy driven supported with EBM kind). You see the Paramedics being allowed to function as Clinicians, where they can make decisions based on their assessments as opposed to following an algorithm. They could have multiple similar drug choices for a condition, and are allowed the autonomy of deciding which one is best for that patient in this moment...without calling medical control or facility. A service I currently dabble in, there is metoprolol...take it or leave it. No cardizem as an option, a better option in many cases. Ketamine....have to call Big Daddy for permission, even when getting arse kicked by agitated patient. RSI? Forget about it...not even willing to discuss it here in Maine, even though this is exactly where it would be most indicated....difficult extractions, long transport times, bad weather, etc.
Lots in the above..
1. We actually have a CP program. Our CP has an associates, but I'm not sure it impacts his day to day. Most of what he does is fall prevention, checking out and helping with their living situation, organizing meds, interfacing with their PCP, and link folks up with resources. If we're talking about progressing that into practitioners, well I think it's an interesting idea, but that is an entirely new educational pathway and an exhausting amount of work. The easier road would be to plug an NP/PA in there instead of creating a new practitioner level. Don't get me wrong, I like this idea, as I think NP/PA pathways aren't really that conducive to paramedic schedules, but it's a lot of work.

2. I wouldn't say we have any "medication choices" (can't choose between cardizem and adenosine, for example we just have adenosine), but what we have, we're free to use based on off-line standing protocols. Articulate the reasons and as long as it's not ridiculous, and you'll never hear boo about it. Side note - I do believe after Albuterol and Narcan, Ketamine is our 3rd most utilized drug. We have full RSI, chemical restraint, etc, and we don't ever call ahead for permission. I'm not saying this to brag, but in the context of this conversation, it's pertinent to note that you and I have the same basic level of education in our paramedic class, yet our systems are very different. It's not a matter of education, it's a matter of standardizing practice.


It is examples like above, where I think if we elevate our entry level standards, put a solid pre-req program in place for the sciences (yes, like every single other medical profession), then we can start to argue for a standardized scope which could cross borders fairly easy. We could actually make claim for higher wages as our services could make claims for higher reimbursement. It is a drawn out process for sure, however other professions did it. No need to reinvent the wheel. Copy what worked and get amongst it!
I can probably agree to this, but we need to get colleges on board with our schedules. I've said for years that if a college would open a unit-day friendly medic to RN program it would stay full for the next 30 years..
 
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Peak

ED/Prehospital Registered Nurse
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There are a number of institutions that will certify you but the JIBC, which I attended, is really the only one worth attending. They have a monopoly on the education for paramedics in BC. After you pass the course they will send your certification to the Emergency Medical Assistants Licensing Board. You can read about it here if you want.

From what I can see the JIBC is an educational institution, not a regulatory body.
 

Amarcord

Forum Probie
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From what I can see the JIBC is an educational institution, not a regulatory body.
I’ve explained to you the process of getting a license. Not sure what else you want here, guy. I guess you’re trying to get me in some pedantic word trap where I said I was a “certified” EMR. Technically, where I’m from, this is true. I’ve also detailed the vast difference between being certified, licensed, and actually working on ambulance. What more do you want here?
 

Amarcord

Forum Probie
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It seems to me like you have a certificate of completion. Do you still have to take a licensure exam? Or can you walk in, fill out a form, and automatically get licensed?

It's a bit like saying I'm certified in medical forensics and child abuse (I'm not) because I have certificates of completion from a university for training in those subjects (which I do).
I’ve really already explained this. First you get a certification. Then you take a licensing EXAM. So yes I still have to take an exam to get licensed. My EMR certification alone does qualify me for certain jobs and positions but simply being a certified EMR really means nothing, which I have been saying all along.
 

Peak

ED/Prehospital Registered Nurse
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I’ve really already explained this. First you get a certification. Then you take a licensing EXAM. So yes I still have to take an exam to get licensed. My EMR certification alone does qualify me for certain jobs and positions but simply being a certified EMR really means nothing, which I have been saying all along.
What can you do with the 'certification' but not licensure?
 

Bishop2047

Forum Crew Member
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I am a Paramedic in Canada (Advanced Care Paramedic) I work on the east coast and in the arctic as a flight Paramedic.

Nationally our scopes are governed by the NOCPs (National Occupational Competency Profile

There are 4 levels of prehospital providers, as per the profiles.

EMR - Typically firefighters or industrial workers may be trained to this level, though some places will allow for an EMR work on car (I have never seen a place where an EMR could be the primary caregiver on an ambulance).

Primary Care Paramedics - These are by far the most common level of paramedic across Canada (Think AEMT scope but with more A+P and college level classes. Often a 2 year diploma program (we do not have Associate's degrees in Canada, a diploma would be equivalent). Alberta still may call their staff an EMT but PCP is more accepted as the proper term.

Advanced Care Paramedics - Typically are 1-3 years of additional schooling. A bachelor's degree is not necessary though it is an option ( I went here and did the degree option as I believe it will be a requiremtn for ALS in the future https://www.mhc.ab.ca/ProgramsandCourses/Academic-Programs/Programs-of-Study/Paramedic) Scope wise very similar to an American Paramedic and the scope does vary by province significantly much like in the States.

Critical Care Paramedics - Are the Bees knees and are typically trained by the specific provinces and are the cream of the crop. In BC they must have an RN background to my understanding, while other provinces assume another year of schooling. dedicated to Air and in facility (they practice much like a physician's assistant in Nova Scotia).

Moving to Canada much like the US will be possible though you may have some gap training or have to start from scratch. I would talk to the licensing body of the province you hope to apply to and they will help guide you. Below i have linked the licensing bodies.

Good luck!

 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
Community Leader
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I am closing this so that I can clean it out. The point of a forum is to share information. If any member continues to post content that discourages other members from posting, they will be suspended and/or banned. I am absolutely done with that attitude, it is not what this community is intended for.

ETA: This has been reopened. This is a thread about working in Canada from the US. I cannot see a reason for continued vitriol.
 
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nfsu1290

Forum Ride Along
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I started this process today actually. It doesn't seem that bad. Just will take some time. The paperwork portion is actually very small for the PCP. If anyone has any legitimate questions, feel free to ask. Should also add, it depends on what province you are doing this in. I am applying for Ontario.
 

Bishop2047

Forum Crew Member
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I started this process today actually. It doesn't seem that bad. Just will take some time. The paperwork portion is actually very small for the PCP. If anyone has any legitimate questions, feel free to ask. Should also add, it depends on what province you are doing this in. I am applying for Ontario.
Ontario is a tough place to get a job, they pump out WAY to many medics for the jobs available. However once you are licensed in one province thanks to labour mobility laws it is very easy to transfer your licence to another. I have gone through the process for 4 provinces in total (I maintain 3 of them). Once your write the COPR https://www.copr.ca/ Exam you will not have to write any exams to licence in another province, though an employer may want to test you.
 

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