Working In Canada

Jcstachnik

Forum Ride Along
2
0
1
I am wanting to work in Canada as a paramedic. I am currently a paramedic in the US what do I need to do any information would be very helpful.
 

akflightmedic

Forum Deputy Chief
3,358
1,820
113
Do you have a degree?
 

hometownmedic5

Forum Asst. Chief
702
561
93
It’s been awhile since I looked at this with an interested eye; but I recall at the time that a NR paramedic could, in theory, with a mountain of paperwork and bureaucratic shenanigans, obtain licensure at their EMT level, which at the time was really more akin to our intermediate level which doesnt exist anymore and which they call a paramedic anyway. I also seem to recall that, by the time you even understand the process, much less get a bead on it, you’d be halfway there if you’d just started over.

It turns out that the “education” we get in the states that some of us complain is so hard and so exhaustive and so in depth doesn’t have the best image overseas...
 

akflightmedic

Forum Deputy Chief
3,358
1,820
113
Every westernized country has had degree medics forever...'cept for 'Murika!

So without a degree, trying to work in Canada, UK, Australia, and many other cool countries who followed their lead...you are going to be very hard pressed to find a job there. Quite simply, why would they want you?

Getting the NR back will definitely help you in travel gigs around the country, and for certain overseas assignments in war torn environments.
 

akflightmedic

Forum Deputy Chief
3,358
1,820
113
If you mean having a more advanced scope independent of Medical Control and the process of being recognized/labeled as "Independent Practitioner", then yes there is a difference, especially if a career ladder and professionalism is of interest. Professionalism in the context of being an educated provider and part of the continuum of care for the at risk population.
 

PotatoMedic

Has no idea what I'm doing.
2,112
982
113
If you mean having a more advanced scope independent of Medical Control and the process of being recognized/labeled as "Independent Practitioner", then yes there is a difference, especially if a career ladder and professionalism is of interest. Professionalism in the context of being an educated provider and part of the continuum of care for the at risk population.
*Mic drop*
 

Remi

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
3,871
2,507
113
More importantly does the OP like Tim Hortons and maple syrup.
Anyone who doesn’t think Timmy Ho’s is the best coffee on the planet is welcomed to fight me now.
 

Remi

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
3,871
2,507
113
If you mean having a more advanced scope independent of Medical Control and the process of being recognized/labeled as "Independent Practitioner", then yes there is a difference, especially if a career ladder and professionalism is of interest. Professionalism in the context of being an educated provider and part of the continuum of care for the at risk population.
But none of that answers the question that @FiremanMike asked....what is the difference in the day to day practice?
 

akflightmedic

Forum Deputy Chief
3,358
1,820
113
I think my first sentence did...if you want specifics, one can Google I guess or call them. However, they do more or determine to do less based on education without having to call Rampart.
 

Remi

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
3,871
2,507
113
I think my first sentence did...if you want specifics, one can Google I guess or call them. However, they do more or determine to do less based on education without having to call Rampart.
“Having a more advanced scope” is vague, nebulous, and subjective.

As long ago as the early 2000’s I worked for a program where our protocols included practically every assessment and intervention conceivable in the prehospital realm at the time and never required medical control consult. You probably worked for places like that, too.

There are different ways to define “advanced scope” and “independent practitioner” but those labels have little to do with day-to-day practice.
 
Last edited:

akflightmedic

Forum Deputy Chief
3,358
1,820
113
Ahhh, but your reply is indicative of a specific program or certain region, whereas "their" expanded scope applies across the board. So if someone is in one of those areas or programs, it may be hard for them to understand what I mean when I reference expanded scope. However, if you were to transition from a very progressive department in Florida where nearly every skill, assessment, treatment was available along with a drug box with 80+ meds to head north (way north) to a state that is 25+ years behind in EMS and basically has about 12-16 drugs Paramedics are allowed to give and even some of those come with required Med Control contact....you would definitely appreciate the description better.
 

FiremanMike

EMS Coordinator
422
164
43
I'm going to hope that it is the nuances of communication over the internet which are causing me to misinterpret some of the replies above as being particularly snarky towards me when they actually arent.

For the record, I have a cum laude bachelors degree with an sGPA of 4.0, I have been an active EMS instructor for 15 years and I am currently working through the pre-reqs for NP school. Despite the fact that my name is "FiremanMike", I am not the stereotypical fire-based medic that folks on this forum love to hate because our patch has a flame on it. I am a huge proponent of education and a lifelong student.

My question was straightforward and not meant to discredit education. A bachelors degree is required in order to practice as a paramedic in other countries, what do line paramedics do in those countries that's different from ours? What 80 different medications do they carry compared to the 16 that you say some medics carry? You mentioned that paramedics are independent practitioners, where is this happening and what exactly does that look like.

I'm actually trying to learn here, I do enjoy understanding what other systems look like.
 

SandpitMedic

Shock&Awe
1,852
909
113
Quit being so sensitive, Mike.
;)
 

akflightmedic

Forum Deputy Chief
3,358
1,820
113
Was not snarky at all. It was a starter reply to understand your background, so when you inquire about working in a different country, it is easiest to ask the very first qualifier (or disqualifier for most US Medics). And for the record, I do not hate on Fire Medics...I hate on those who actively lobby against better standards, degree entry level, and just about anything extra to put "us" on par with the rest of the world when it comes to Paramedicine, (IAFF really has done us no favors in this regard).

As for the number of medicines, that was a comparison between Florida and Maine to show the disparity between two states, just to reiterate that as a country, let alone a state, we are completely different in scope and practice. Heck, there are some spots in Florida where neighboring county services are drastically different in scope. So it is with that in mind, that I advocate for better initial education, then hopefully change can be implemented service by service, state by state to where we are all on the same page regardless of where we sleep at night (you know, like other westernized nations).

In regards to Independent Practitioners, you see a lot of community paramedicine (years before we considered it), you see a lot of treatment, no transport (Not AMA kind, but policy driven supported with EBM kind). You see the Paramedics being allowed to function as Clinicians, where they can make decisions based on their assessments as opposed to following an algorithm. They could have multiple similar drug choices for a condition, and are allowed the autonomy of deciding which one is best for that patient in this moment...without calling medical control or facility. A service I currently dabble in, there is metoprolol...take it or leave it. No cardizem as an option, a better option in many cases. Ketamine....have to call Big Daddy for permission, even when getting arse kicked by agitated patient. RSI? Forget about it...not even willing to discuss it here in Maine, even though this is exactly where it would be most indicated....difficult extractions, long transport times, bad weather, etc.

It is examples like above, where I think if we elevate our entry level standards, put a solid pre-req program in place for the sciences (yes, like every single other medical profession), then we can start to argue for a standardized scope which could cross borders fairly easy. We could actually make claim for higher wages as our services could make claims for higher reimbursement. It is a drawn out process for sure, however other professions did it. No need to reinvent the wheel. Copy what worked and get amongst it!
 

Peak

ED/Prehospital Registered Nurse
464
254
63
I think that every time this debate comes up it ends up being the same thing. It's about being a professional versus being a technician.

Can the job be done technically with less than two years of education (and there are many programs that are far less than a year)? Sure. It's been done for a while this way and you get a pretty good product for a pretty low cost.

Does having a license that can be obtained in months build the profession? No.

Certainly there are good paramedics without advanced degrees, but the real leaders are always out improving themselves, the base will largely remain the same.

This goes for the majority of jobs though. Could somebody produce cost effective journalism with an associates or less? Sure. Would it be the same as someone who has graduate education and is always seeking out how to improve their work? Absolutely not.
 
Top