When?

ViolynEMT

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You have musician ears. A decent stethoscope might be of more benefit to you than most. Then again, you're probably more likely to pick up all kinds of noise artifacts most of us wouldn't notice anyway. The single best person at auscultating I've ever met is a cardiologist who plays an instrument semi-professionally. She could probably differentiate S3/4 on a gnat in mid-flight in the back of an ambulance.


That's so funny. I never thought about that. I've always separated my two professions. I like that concept way better than the "old" concept. :p

So then, what stethoscope should I get?
 

NomadicMedic

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That's so funny. I never thought about that. I've always separated my two professions. I like that concept way better than the "old" concept. :p

So then, what stethoscope should I get?

Unless you're planning on becoming a cardiologist, what you have is more than fine.
 

ViolynEMT

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Unless you're planning on becoming a cardiologist, what you have is more than fine.


My wallet will be happy about that. Now if I can just learn to keep my fingers still so I don't hear them creaking........
 

Tigger

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I'd say a Littmann lightweight IIse is a decent, but inexpensive stethoscope. It is more than adequate for an EMT, will last forever and certainly beats all that double tube noise you'll get with a cheap sprague scope. And you're not tossing $100+ down the stethoscope hole.
I recently slammed my classic II in the door several times (don't ask) and was given a Master Cardiology by a guy that retired. Besides looking awesome, it is of no more real practicality for most EMS use.
 

chaz90

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I recently slammed my classic II in the door several times (don't ask) and was given a Master Cardiology by a guy that retired. Besides looking awesome, it is of no more real practicality for most EMS use.
I recently upgraded to a master cardiology from a master classic for really no good reason at all besides wanting to try it. Really, I could hear everything well enough before, but I can also genuinely hear them better with the master cardiology. Again, I know it doesn't change my practice at all and both have acoustics well beyond what I need as a lowly paramedic, but I really like the new one.

The first shift I had my new stethoscope I brought both along on calls (most assuredly looking like a total idiot) and listened to the patient twice for everything using both stethoscopes and was able to hear a difference. I like listening to heart tones even though I'm terrible at it, and they seem louder to me on the master cardiology, perhaps due to the larger diaphragm.

Not saying the cost difference is justifiable or remotely necessary for EMS use, but I don't regret it for me. I've yet to lose a stethoscope (knock on wood), used my previous one for 4 years, and love the new one so far. No guarantee that it won't disappear, but if a master cardiology with olive green tubing, a smoke chest piece, and my unusual last name engraved prominently on it appears anywhere else on this peninsula I think news would get back to me. Not to mention I sold my master classic to a roommate and that worked out nicely. Opinions may vary :)

TLDR Version: Buy what you want, can easily afford, and won't make you sob uncontrollably for weeks if lost. Avoid the incredibly cheap and chintzy stuff that is given away free or included in some gear bags. Anything north of and including a Littmann Lightweight II will easily suffice, and 100 different people will give you 200 different opinions on this subject.
 
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Amelia

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So what is an average cost of items? I'm a big believer in "you get what you pay for" and "you can't go wrong if you shoot for the middle." So besides the $5 sheers, what else should I put on my list (not to purchase just yet).
 

Gurby

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I used a Littmann Lightweight as a basic, upgraded to a Cardiology III for medic. I'm pretty happy with how it worked out.
 

Tigger

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I guess I could have phrased better, the Cardiology type stethoscopes are certainly better tools, but I'm not sure the money is quite worth it. But if you swing it, do it. They are pretty cool/well crafted instruments.
 

chaz90

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So what is an average cost of items? I'm a big believer in "you get what you pay for" and "you can't go wrong if you shoot for the middle." So besides the $5 sheers, what else should I put on my list (not to purchase just yet).
If you get a full time job, comfortable boots are the number 1 item for me. As so many others have said, cheap boots work fine for rides and class, but when you spend multiple 24 hour shifts in a pair of boots making a living spending a bit more money is easily worth it. The important thing to remember about this is that more money doesn't necessarily buy a better boot. You have to spend some minimum to get something quality that will last, but preferences on brands and models vary. Try them on as much as possible and break them in fully before work.
 

Tigger

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So what is an average cost of items? I'm a big believer in "you get what you pay for" and "you can't go wrong if you shoot for the middle." So besides the $5 sheers, what else should I put on my list (not to purchase just yet).

I'd wait till you have a job or volunteer position or what have you. Then see what you need to purchase. Some companies reimburse, some companies have stock on hand to give you, things like that. Aside from a stethoscope, you don't much for clinicals. I did mine in ****ies and a white polo and a borrowed pair of black boots.

Where I work now we have uniform allowance, another one of my jobs gives you everything from shirts to 5.11 boots, you get the idea.
 

WestMetroMedic

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IMO I would just buy a decent steth, like a Littmann classic II, it'll serve you well from emt school thru medic school and probably then some. Same thing with boots, I'd buy a decent comfortable pair now, don't waste your money on buying cheap versions of these now only to buy better ones down the road. As for shears and other tools, you can buy those cheap since once you start working your employer will supply you with everything you need.
Buy a nice pair of Doc Martens black shoes. Comfortable as hell, and look professional on duty and casual enough for off duty. You always need a good pair of black shoes...
I wore the men's version of these for 'pert near everything on and off duty for two years a pair.
http://www.drmartens.com/us/Womens/WOMEN'S-1461/p/11837002
 

dank

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Ok, EMT school starts a week from today (eeeek!) and I am looking at all of these threads about awesome boots, sheers, stethoscopes, etc... My question is, when should I start purchasing these items? Beginning? Mid? or end of class? I'm not sure when clinicals are (which we're doing in the ER, although I may ask to do a ride along too).

The boots I want to get are pricey but are known to be great EMS/Fire boots and they dont need much break in, but, yes, I do want plenty of time to break them in.

Thoughts?
EMT class does not have clinicals. That would be for medic certification.
 
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Amelia

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Well we have to do shifts in the ER. My husband may have rubbed his vocabulaey off in me.
 

dank

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"Mine did as well. Every program I've heard of does, including online."
Clinicals refers to working in a clinic, not doing practicals in a classroom setting. There is no reason an EMT-B would need to be in a clinic. The state of Maryland EMT-B certification program does not have clinicals as they are just unnecessary for that program.
 
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Amelia

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What was explained to us in class is that we will not be EMT-Bs, but not quite AEMTs. I dont know. But yes, we have to do 10-12 hours in the ED in order to get our certification (along with the NREMT license). Whether its necessary or not doesnt really matter- it is whats required of the program.
 
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Amelia

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I guess our state doesnt have EMT-B, its FR, then EMT-I/85 then P.
 

RefriedEMT

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Yea, i got lucky with my clinicals and instead of working an ER for EMT training I got to work on a fire engine with 2 emts and a paramedic as my proctor, which I personally think its always better to train where your really going to work and most EMT's in my area don't work in ERs.
 
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