What to expect in EMT-B clinicals?

tcd

Forum Probie
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Hi All,

This is my first post, so I'll preface my actual question by saying that this is a great community and resource for anyone interested or working in EMS.

Now to the topic at hand -

I currently have zero EMS experience, but in January will be enrolled in an EMT-B program at my local community college. I'd like to find out more on what to expect in the clinical portion of the training. Here are some questions:

1. Is it all ride-alongs?
2. Or a combination of ride-alongs and on-site work at an ER?
3. Is it reasonable to expect exposure and participation in all types of scenarios, from false alarms to major trauma or coding situations that may end negatively?
4. Are some clinical assignments better than others? Or are they usually all ER/911 based?

I'm also very keen to hear about your own experiences doing your first clinical rotation as an EMT-B. What were the toughest aspects of it? What you did to overcome any fears or obstacles?

And of course if you have any additional advice for someone just starting out I'd love to hear it.

Thanks!

- T
 
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medic417

The Truth Provider
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Depends on your school. Some require more than others. Some have better clinical and ambulance ride out sites than others. Best way to get accurate answer is ask the school and ask those that recently completed it.
 

Tigger

Dodges Pucks
Community Leader
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Some states have requirements for clinical hours, and they require certain time in and out of hospital. Others just have hourly requirements with no preference for environment, and some have none at all.

As mentioned, ask your prospective schools. Many schools have relationships with local providers, so even if there isn't a clinical requirement the opportunity to do a ride along or whatnot is there.
 

Jimmy29687

Forum Ride Along
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TCD,
I will be starting also in January. I went through the same class in 04 but due to job change I had to stop. I did make it through the clinical portion. The school required 40 hours on the truck. Where are you located? I'm in South Carolina.
Jimmy
 

Chief Complaint

Forum Captain
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Some states have requirements for clinical hours, and they require certain time in and out of hospital. Others just have hourly requirements with no preference for environment, and some have none at all.

As mentioned, ask your prospective schools. Many schools have relationships with local providers, so even if there isn't a clinical requirement the opportunity to do a ride along or whatnot is there.


^THIS^

Hey OP, where are you located? There are posters on these boards from all over the country so we might be able to provide some answers for you if we know where you will be attending class.

My EMT class only required 10 hours of clinicals which could be done in a hospital ER or on an ambulance. That was just my experience though, it varies quite a bit between programs.

EDIT: To address some of your other questions, there wasnt much participation expected of us. We were there to observe, or maybe put somebody on O2. I suppose if an extra set of hands was needed for CPR they would allow that as well.
 
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Handsome Robb

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It's also going to depend how comfortable the medic/nurse/tech your working with is with you, your knowledge and skills.

I got to do quite a bit on my rides for B and I. I more so than B.
 
OP
OP
T

tcd

Forum Probie
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Hi All,

Thanks for the replies so far. I'm in Austin, TX and will attend courses at Austin Community College. Their EMT-B program requires 64hrs of clinical time and I'll see if I can contact an adviser to discuss the details. I'd also love to hear from anyone here that's gone through any of ACC's EMS programs.

Thanks,

- T
 

Chief Complaint

Forum Captain
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It's also going to depend how comfortable the medic/nurse/tech your working with is with you, your knowledge and skills.

I got to do quite a bit on my rides for B and I. I more so than B.

Good point, it really depends on your preceptor. Ive worked with some who dont want students doing anything besides observe, and others who will let students run the entire call.

Hi All,

Thanks for the replies so far. I'm in Austin, TX and will attend courses at Austin Community College. Their EMT-B program requires 64hrs of clinical time and I'll see if I can contact an adviser to discuss the details. I'd also love to hear from anyone here that's gone through any of ACC's EMS programs.

Thanks,

- T

Well that sounds good, 64 hours is quite a bit more than any program around here. Thats a good thing. Get some more info from your advisor...and have fun!
 

bigbaldguy

Former medic seven years 911 service in houston
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Hi All,

Thanks for the replies so far. I'm in Austin, TX and will attend courses at Austin Community College. Their EMT-B program requires 64hrs of clinical time and I'll see if I can contact an adviser to discuss the details. I'd also love to hear from anyone here that's gone through any of ACC's EMS programs.

Thanks,

- T

ACC is by all reports a very good program.
 

SSwain

Forum Captain
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Here in WI, (through the tech school I am in) we have a requirement of 5 PT contacts via ride alongs. We can start that once we have 46 hours of class completed.
Total class time is 140 or 150 hours. I am told next year, the time will be 200 hours.
 

dstevens58

Forum Lieutenant
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At a certain point in our class (sorry, can't remember), but perhaps after the CPR certification, we had to do 10 hours in the emergency room and by the end of the class, we had to document as least 10 patient contacts. They did not determine a time on the patient contacts, but considering rural EMS that I'm involved with, from start-to-finish on a call, averages 2 hrs/run....so 10 hours or so.
 

Jimmy29687

Forum Ride Along
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Picked up my books yesterday. Gonna need a forklift to carry them! "Prehospital Emergency Care" 9th edition with workbook.
 
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