We got Epi Auto-Injectors

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
Community Leader
5,182
213
63
Effective 12/22, all BLS rigs in the county now carry EPI Auto-injectors. We now have protocols and are allowed to administer per Med Control. Previously we were only allowed to use the Pt's own injector.

Another step forward for BLS!
 

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
8,969
58
48
That's one thing the state of Washington has done right. There is a law called the Kristine Kastner Act that REQUIRES all ambulances in the state to carry Epi Auto-Injectors, and outlines a procedure for their use (even on patients that don't have a prescription for Epi).

Good to see you're moving in the right direction.
 

Summit

Critical Crazy
2,255
805
113
That's oustanding.

I was excited to learn that basics can put in combitubes in the county I work in.
 

SafetyPro2

Forum Safety Officer
772
2
0
We can only assist with a patient's own prescribed injector.

California schools, however, can allow any staff member with minimal training (CPR and recognition of anaphylaxis) to carry and adminster an Epi-Pen. Go figure.
 

rescuecpt

Community Leader Emeritus
2,088
1
0
BLS have had epi-pens in NY for a couple years now... we can give it even if the pt. has no history. It's a lifesaver.
 

Jon

Administrator
Community Leader
7,989
48
48
Originally posted by rescuecpt@Dec 17 2004, 11:42 AM
BLS have had epi-pens in NY for a couple years now... we can give it even if the pt. has no history. It's a lifesaver.
PA just started in September. Squads are starting to phase it in, slowly. Wish it would be sooner :rolleyes: . With any luck, though, by spring some local squads should have them, as we get into bee sting season

Jon


PS - before anyone statrs shouting, I know they are useful for much more than insect stings
 

ResTech

Forum Asst. Chief
888
1
0
I think Epi-Pens are great and are nice to have on BLS units. Epi is a true life-saver. From a logistial point of view though they're are going to be alot of expired Epi-Pens being disposed of given the infrequent volume of calls for anaphaylaxis. From my own personal experience over the past eight years as a career and vol. provider, I have a hard time recounting patients that I would have given Epi to.

However, I feel that no price tag can be placed on a life-saving drug and if one patient can be saved in a five year period then it is worth the cost. In Pennsylvania, if an EMS service decides to place Epi-Pens onboard we have to carry two adult pens and two pediatric pens. So your looking at about 240.00 per unit. My volly station has three BLS ambulances so that is kinda a hefty expense of around $720.00 for something that will rarely get used and will mostly get tossed. And considering ALS comes from a mile or so down the street is it really feasible? For this reason my volly station is not getting them however my career dept. has the class required scheduled at the end of January.

My opinion it depends on geography and EMS system. But the logistical aspect should at least be taken into consideration but definitely not be the sole reason for not placing such an important drug in the hands of BLS.
 

rescuecpt

Community Leader Emeritus
2,088
1
0
Originally posted by ResTech@Dec 22 2004, 09:05 PM
I think Epi-Pens are great and are nice to have on BLS units. Epi is a true life-saver. From a logistial point of view though they're are going to be alot of expired Epi-Pens being disposed of given the infrequent volume of calls for anaphaylaxis. From my own personal experience over the past eight years as a career and vol. provider, I have a hard time recounting patients that I would have given Epi to.

However, I feel that no price tag can be placed on a life-saving drug and if one patient can be saved in a five year period then it is worth the cost. In Pennsylvania, if an EMS service decides to place Epi-Pens onboard we have to carry two adult pens and two pediatric pens. So your looking at about 240.00 per unit. My volly station has three BLS ambulances so that is kinda a hefty expense of around $720.00 for something that will rarely get used and will mostly get tossed. And considering ALS comes from a mile or so down the street is it really feasible? For this reason my volly station is not getting them however my career dept. has the class required scheduled at the end of January.

My opinion it depends on geography and EMS system. But the logistical aspect should at least be taken into consideration but definitely not be the sole reason for not placing such an important drug in the hands of BLS.
Look into expired meds replacement. I have a couple vendors at the FD that I use that will exchange some (not all) of our expired meds for new ones since we have a low call volume but always stay fully stocked. Also, the hospital will swap some expired meds for us too from time to time.
 

coloradoemt

Forum Asst. Chief
616
2
0
We have them too. I have not had to use one yet, but it is nice to know we have them.
 

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
8,969
58
48
We just got a protocol change this week that allows us to administer Epi to any patient that needs it, regardless of age or prescription. Before, we could administer Epi to anyone under 18 if asked, and over 18 if they had a prescription.
 
Top