The difference between Combat Medic and B.EMC Course

Combat Medic Or B.EMC civilian paramedic

  • Combat Medic

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • B.EMC civilian paramedic

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
  • Poll closed .

Louis

Forum Ride Along
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1
Good day

I would like to know what the diff. between Combat medic and B.EMC Course are.
I know the one works with the ARMY / NAVY / AIR FORCE. and the other is a civilian paramedic that I clearly under stand.

I have done my First aid level 3 not much I know but I was brought up in the Emergency environment my dad is a Firefighter and ALS medic. I am currently working part time at a trauma hospital with Dr.s and I love it.

My question is what is the diff. between the two qualifications and what is the Pros and Cons.
I have Google this question but I want to find out from true medic what it is.

I am getting my stuff ready and would like to know which one to go first.
Ps I am from South Africa and we don't have combat medics + the army here is not of quality.


Will someone please help me out.
 

shelvpower

Forum Crew Member
78
10
8
Good day Louis. Drop me a pm with your contact details and we can have a chat
 

shelvpower

Forum Crew Member
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10
8
@STXmedic. Bachelor's of Emergency Medical Care. A South African university degree that is 4 years long and specialises in ALS and various rescue modules
 

shelvpower

Forum Crew Member
78
10
8
What Louis is actually asking. Is it possible for a South African citizens to become a combat medic in the USA and if so, wjat courses does one do to get into the career?
 

shelvpower

Forum Crew Member
78
10
8
I dont think the BEMC course will be 'accredited' in the USA? The other problem is probably getting citizenship with the above mentioned degree behind ones name.
 

RocketMedic

Californian, Lost in Texas
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The combat medic is the functional equivalent of "advanced first aid", maybe EMT.
 

Handsome Robb

Youngin'
Premium Member
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I believe you have to be a U.S. citizen to be part of our armed forces,
Actually it's on par with AEMT, they give you EMT after the first seven weeks of training then you have about 10 more weeks of training

He's a combat medic with deployments.
 

CFal

Forum Captain
431
2
18
I believe you have to be a U.S. citizen to be part of our armed forces,


He's a combat medic with deployments.
Maybe I read it wrong, but you have to be at least an EMT basic to be a combat medic, plus additional training for IVs and drugs and what not. You do not need to be a citizen, but in most cases you need a green card.
 

CFal

Forum Captain
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" Advanced EMT. There may also be opportunities for the Army to either adapt its curriculum or develop a bridge training program (possibly in coordination with community colleges) to allow Soldiers who have completed initial training to attain their Advanced EMT (AEMT) certification from the NREMT. The Army has conducted a detailed gap analysis comparing its training to the National EMS Standards for all levels of EMTs – First Responder, Basic, Advanced, and Paramedic, which shows that all of the EMS standards for AEMT are covered through 68W initial training. However, in order to actually offer the AEMT exam as part of initial training, the Army would have to ensure that its training meets or exceeds the national EMS standards and meets NREMT standards for test administration. The Army may want to conduct a cost-benefit analysis of adding AEMT certification to its curriculum or explore options for ensuring the curriculum meets the NREMT requirements so that Soldiers completing the program can take the practical and written exams through NREMT (an option that is available for AEMT, but not EMT-B). "
 

Handsome Robb

Youngin'
Premium Member
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I typed that then I thought I deleted it. You're correct you don't have to be a citizen but you do have to live here and have a green card.


I believe his comment was directed more at personal experiences than anything else.
 

RocketMedic

Californian, Lost in Texas
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The functional equivalent of a military medic in skills authorized is AEMT. The effective use of those medics in most units most closely resembles a medical assistant. In units where the medics act semi-autonomously under protocols, they are generally limited to first aid and bls.
 
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