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TCCC, TECC, ITLS, PHTLS, TP-C, Acronyms everywhere

Discussion in 'Military/Tactical/Wilderness EMS' started by ExpatMedic0, Sep 5, 2016.

  1. ExpatMedic0

    ExpatMedic0 B.S. paramedicine, NRP, CCEMT-P Premium Member

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    Hey guys,
    I am hoping someone can provide some clarity for me regarding "Tactical EMS" and Prehospital Tactical themed Trauma courses. I am having a hard time differentiating them

    First off, Let me start with what I think I may (or may not) know.

    1. The BCCTPC (aka IBSC) offers the Tactical Paramedic Certification (TP-C) This is a written test (like the FP-C for example) but there is no mandatory course or practical portion required before taking the written test?
    https://www.ibscertifications.org/certifications

    2. The NAEMT offers Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) certification which according to the NAEMT website is based on PHTLS for combatants and combat support for military environments? http://www.naemt.org/education/TCCC.aspx

    3. The NAEMT also offers Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) Which according to the NAEMT website is based on TCCC, but for civilian EMS providers who are involved in some form of tactical EMS operations? http://www.naemt.org/education/tecc

    4. The NAEMT also offers a military provider version of Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) which is really confusing since they also offer TCCC and TECC (and also a lower level LEFR-TCC for cops)? So really confused as to how military provider PHTLS differs from TCCC for example
    http://www.naemt.org/education/PHTLS/PHTLScourses.aspx

    5. ITLS offers a military provider version of International Trauma Life Support (ITLS) just when it could not get anymore confusing. This appears to be a direct competitor to the PHTLS military cert?
    https://www.itrauma.org/education/itls-military/

    6. The National Park Service and other agencies offers Counter Narcotics and Terrorism Operational Medical Support (CONTOMS), which appears to result in a EMT-T and EMT-T Advanced certification and is also one of the older programs I herd back about back in the early 2000's. Appears to be a SWAT medic themed course, but I could be wrong?
    https://www.nps.gov/subjects/uspp/contoms.htm

    7. Am I missing any? Does any of this information sound wrong? I am especially confused about the military themed ITLS and PHTLS courses and how they differ.
     
  2. dutemplar

    dutemplar Forum Lieutenant

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    Nutshell version:

    TPC is a test the wizards came up with to see if you understand the concepts of tactical medicine. You're paying for letters and tested on "current materials knowledge.

    PHTLS and ITLS are basically the same materials. But released by a different group of doctors. PHTLS is the American College of Surgeons. ITLS is the American College of Emergency Physicians.

    TECC is actually more like "combat medicine for cops." They're now pushing that for tacticool EMS and "first responders." Pretty much TQ, needle decompression/"cric" airway (if you consider a one hour lesson in how to do a cricothyroidotomy a lesson), drags and carries and an introduction to the concept of "Get off the X" "life saving intervention.". Course quality varies GREATLY even given the same packaged content and you get what you pay for...

    TCCC Is more a 24 hour couse of "combat medicine for medics" It has a lot more in it than cops need (or want) but it certainly isn't a 16 hour 18D program. Combat dressings, TQs, junctional TQs, crics, IOs, TXA, Ketamine... Overkill for cops. This was designed as either"ITLS" or "PHTLS" for combat medics" Course quality varies GREATLY.

    There is a difference in the military and civilian trauma courses. Military tends to get big massive wounds, civilians tend to get a lot more normal fractures and injuries. Civilians tend to get all age brackets.. military, not as much. The military "trauma" modules are geared very much towards bullets, bombs and such. NOT for car crashes, normal impalements,...

    I thought CONTOMS vanished back in the day. A few agencies do offer Tacticool Medic programs, Cyprus Creek Tx comes to mind, CDP Anniston was talking about it but I don't know if they pulled the trigger.

    I don't know CCs quality, I've merely seen it advertised for several years. Caveat emptor.
    Cyprus Creek: http://www.ccems.com/special-operations/basic-tactical-operational-medical-support-course-btomsc/
     
    ExpatMedic0 likes this.
  3. EpiEMS

    EpiEMS Forum Deputy Chief

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    Apparently they're also developing a BLS version...for what it's worth...
     
  4. Summit

    Summit Critical Crap

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    Oh good even more good acronyms!

    Uncle Sam is literally taking lessons!
     
  5. WolfmanHarris

    WolfmanHarris Forum Asst. Chief

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    Are any of these courses actually required for a medic to get on their tac team in most areas? Up here our tactical medics go through selection (written exam, scenario exam, the PD tactical team physical test, then an interview) but all the training is done after they're selected. I'd have to double check but I think they spend about 6 weeks FT training plus their ongoing training with PD's team and usual CME requirements.
     
  6. dutemplar

    dutemplar Forum Lieutenant

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    It's a split between agencies and policies may differ.

    However, the courses provide a basic foundation for tactical operations, care under fire, and casualty extrication and management. Some places prefer their in-house training. Level and quality differs.

    It _should_ be moving towards a standard of training with local flavor. I would expect TP-C to become "normal."
     

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