Radio license to use EMS comms?

RedBlanketRunner

Opheophagus Hannah Cuddler
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Thanks to the ARRL, @bklynrob for chiming in. Also, take into account the FCC 2 watt rule:

When I went to license a repeater for an ambulance service the FCC told me it would take 6 months. When I inquired why so long I was sent the priority list: Ambulance services were below veterinarians and beach patrols. Has this changed?
 
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Summit

Critical Crazy
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Only use your HAM callsign on HAM frequencies.
 

CCCSD

Forum Captain
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Thanks to the ARRL, @bklynrob for chiming in. Also, take into account the FCC 2 watt rule:

When I went to license a repeater for an ambulance service the FCC told me it would take 6 months. When I inquired why so long I was sent the priority list: Ambulance services were below veterinarians and beach patrols. Has this changed?
sigh...really?
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
Community Leader
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sigh...really?
Yeah. Really.

Also to reiterate: HAM license only authorizes transmission on HAM bands only. Those $20 personal radios are very limited to 2 watts. My Ham portables are capable of 3-6 watts, depending upon model, and I'm authorized per my license to go WAY beyond that. FRS radios are even more restricted - 0.5 watts and you cannot change the antenna to a more efficient design.

If your service needs comms, you can get it either through the County and become an authorized user of their system, you can obtain your own FCC license and you'll be restricted to the frequency/frequencies you may use, or you can look for a radio comm company from whom your company can become a user of their system. One of my old ambulance companies did that, they had 4 area repeaters they could use, though none were tied together, dispatch could hear all 4. They also were required to obtain radios from the County so they could talk to the hospitals and EMS 911 dispatch. Those radios also had digital ID numbers so everyone could see (and keep track of) the system users. That being said, if you had a free-banded radio that could transmit on those frequencies, you could talk to any user. To get their attention, you did have to ring-down the desired user using their digital ID. This was especially true of dispatch and the hospitals. Only if they were actually at the console could you get a response from them by just keying up and talking...

My personal portable radio also had CALCORD and a couple other frequencies stored for emergent use. Truly sadly, my portable radio also had far better audio than the County supplied units.
 

RedBlanketRunner

Opheophagus Hannah Cuddler
87
7
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And to mention, if anyone wants the technical low down on radio communications, the ARRL handbook is IT!. Beware, 'handbook is a misnomer, it's more along the lines of an EMF encyclopedia. http://www.arrl.org/arrl-handbook-2019
Bonus. And if you ever run across an old 10 gallon plus tub tube power sonic cleaner, GRAB IT. Your serious ham will trade a hefty chunk of anatomy and their first born son, or all sorts of esoteric radio info for that 1000 watt+ afterburner.
As in designed the two mast placements on the hospital, worked out intermod, got us a serious break on a Phelps Dodge and gave me 130 feet low loss Belden coax)
 
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RedBlanketRunner

Opheophagus Hannah Cuddler
87
7
8
sigh...really?
If you don't know something, feel free to ask somebody, or web search. If you do a web search on the FCC rules where you will find what I mentioned the word "megacycles" is used which shows how antiquated it is.
Did you know that all radio frequencies above 100 meters technically are reserved for amateur radio operators? You would have a better chance of finding such info in the ARRL handbook though. The FCC rules and regs are sort of a mess.

PS Before you ask what my comments have to do with the original topic, could you tell me why "life safety and the alleviation of suffering" got placed below veterinarians?
 
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